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    Cold War Museum

    Founder Gary Powers, Jr. gave a tour of the Cold War Museum in Warrenton, Virginia, built on a former U.S. Army communication base that was used by the National Security Agency, CIA, and Army intelligence during the Cold War. Mr. Powers told the story of the Cold War through artifacts and photographs, and he also told the story of his father, Francis Gary Powers, whose U-2 spy plane was shot down over the Soviet Union on May 1, 1960.

    199 views
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    National Frontier Trail Museum

    Independence, Missouri, was the origination point for travelers heading west during the period of western expansion in the United States. Leah Palmer, events and education manager at the National Frontier Trails Museum, talked about the five trails that began in Missouri and explained what life was like for the pioneers making those treks.

    C-SPAN’s Local Content Vehicles (LCVs) made a stop in their “2018 LCV Cities Tour” in Independence, Missouri, from October 24-31, 2018, to feature the history and literary life of the community. Working with the Comcast cable local affiliate, they visited literary and historic sites where local historians, authors, and civic leaders were interviewed. The history segments air on American History TV (AHTV) on C-SPAN3 and the literary events/non-fiction author segments air on Book TV on C-SPAN2.

    224 views
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    Curse of Tippecanoe

    Marc Newman analyzes the “Curse of Tippecanoe.” According to the legend, the “Prophet,” brother of Shawnee Chief Tecumseh, placed a curse on President William Henry Harrison after the defeat at the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811. He spoke about the origins of the legend and the deaths of several presidents. The curse is often cited in popular culture as the reason for the deaths of presidents elected in years ending in zero. These deaths include those of President Harrison, elected in 1840, President Lincoln, elected in 1860, President Kennedy, elected in 1960, and others.

    666 views
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    The Pox and the Covenant

    Tony Williams talked about his book The Pox and the Covenant: Mather, Franklin, and the Epidemic That Changed America’s Destiny, in which he recounts an outbreak of smallpox in Boston in 1721 following the arrival of a ship from the West Indies, the HMS Seahorse. A debate ensued between Puritans, led by Reverend Cotton Mather, who believed that fasting and prayer were the only defense against the virus and the medical community who supported the newly introduced practice of inoculation. Tony Williams presented his book at R.J. Julia Booksellers in Madison, Connecticut.

    647 views
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    Air Quality Act of 1967

    Jeff Holmstead and Robin Juni talked about the Air Quality Act of 1967 and the current state of the law.

    This program was part of a week-long series on the “Great Society,” which was a series of political initiatives President Lyndon Johnson took with the goals of promoting equality and ending poverty.

    C-SPAN Radio’s Nancy Calo read news headlines at the conclusion of the program.

    366 views
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    LBJ's Great Society and War on Poverty

    Robert Woodson and Michael Lind talked about President Lyndon Johnson’s goal of promoting equality and ending poverty with the Civil Rights Act and the Economic Opportunity Act. Topics included progress made in fighting poverty, income disparity in the present, factors that contribute to poverty, and the effectiveness of social safety net programs.

    This was part of a week-long series on the “Great Society,” which was a series of political initiatives President Lyndon Johnson took with the goals of promoting equality and ending poverty.

    645 views
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    LBJ's Great Society and the Voting Rights Act

    Nicole Austin-Hillery and Hans con Spakovsky talked about the Voting Rights Act, which President Johnson signed the act into law on August 6, 1965. Other topics included state voter identification laws enacted since 2010, and the congressional redistricting process.

    This was part of a week-long series on the “Great Society,” which was a series of political initiatives President Lyndon Johnson took with the goals of promoting equality and ending poverty.

    676 views
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    Public Broadcasting Act

    Patricia de Stacy Harrison talked about the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, which created the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and, eventually, the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) and National Public Radio (NPR). She described the circumstances in the 1960s that convinced President Johnson of the need for the act, and the CPB’s mission, funding, and evolution over the years.

    This program was part of a week-long series on the “Great Society,” which was a series of political initiatives President Lyndon Johnson took with the goals of promoting equality and ending poverty.

    C-SPAN Radio’s Nancy Calo also reads news headlines at the conclusion of the segment.

    688 views
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    Ping-Pong Diplomacy

    Nicholas Griffin talked about his book, Ping-Pong Diplomacy: The Secret History Behind the Game That Changed the World, in which he examines China’s use of the game of ping-pong to recast their foreign policy initiatives in the early 1970's; namely with their surprise invitation to the U.S. table tennis team in the spring of 1971. The succeeding welcome the American team received by their Chinese hosts laid the groundwork for President Richard Nixon’s trip to China and the eventual thaw in U.S. and Chinese diplomatic relations. Nicholas Griffin spoke at Books and Books bookstore in Coral Gables, Florida.

    443 views
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    Black Flags, Blue Waters

    Eric Jay Dolin provided a history of piracy in the America’s in the 17th and 18th centuries.

    295 views
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