1:30 PM EDT

James Sensenbrenner Jr., R-WI 9th

Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, as chairman of the Committee on Science, I have worked with my friend and colleague, Mr. George E. Brown, Jr., of California for the past 2 1/2 years to advance legislation that meets our Nation's research and development funding needs. Regrettably, Congressman Brown is no longer with us. I am pleased to say that this legislation continues that tradition, only this time we have a new ranking member, the gentleman from Texas (Mr. HALL).

H.R. 1551 authorizes the FAA to conduct research and development activities for fiscal years 2000 and 2001.

Shortly, I will offer a manager's amendment that was crafted in consultation with the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. The amendment strikes certain provisions of H.R. 1551 which were already authorized earlier this summer through House passage of H.R. 1000, the Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century.

As amended by my manager's amendment, H.R. 1551 authorizes $208 million in fiscal year 2000 and $223 million in fiscal year 2001 for the FAA to conduct research and development in the areas of air traffic, management, communications, navigation, weather, aircraft safety, system security, airport technology, and human factors.

The legislation fully funds the administration's fiscal 2000 request and allows a modest, but necessary, increase of 3 percent over fiscal year 1999 enacted funding level for the various research and development activities.

Mr. Chairman, the Committee on Science takes its oversight responsibilities very seriously. I am pleased that H.R. 1551 includes important provisions to ensure that our Nation's investments in aviation R&D are effectively utilized.

For instance, section 5 of the legislation implements recommendations by the Inspector General by requiring the FAA to work cooperatively with NASA to jointly prepare and transmit to Congress an integrated civil aviation safety R&D plan that clearly defines the rules and responsibilities of the two agencies.

Section 4 requires the FAA to implement strategic planning consistent with the Government Performance and Results Act in the development of aviation plans.

Finally, H.R. 1551 ensures accountability and public access to award information by requiring the FAA to post the abstracts related to all unclassified R&D grants and awards on the agency's Internet home page.

I would like to commend gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs. MORELLA), the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Technology, and the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. BARCIA), the ranking member of the subcommittee, for their hard work they have done in crafting this legislation.

Mr. Chairman, H.R. 1551 is a good bill, and I urge my colleagues to support it.

Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.

1:35 PM EDT

Connie Morella, R-MD 8th

Mrs. MORELLA. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman from Wisconsin (Chairman SENSENBRENNER) for yielding the time and for his leadership in helping to bring this bill forward to the House. I also want to commend the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. BARCIA), the new ranking member of the Committee on Science, for his support throughout the process.

As chair of the Subcommittee on Technology, and on behalf of the distinguished gentleman from Michigan (Mr. BARCIA), our ranking member, I am pleased to offer H.R. 1551, which is entitled the Civil Aviation Research and Development Act of 1999, for its passage by the House today.

Overall, the legislation after acceptance of the manager's amendment will authorize $208 million in fiscal year 2000 and $229 million in fiscal year 2001 for the Federal Aviation Administration in order to have them conduct research and development activities that are helping to increase the efficiency and safety of aviation.

A safe and efficient air transportation system is essential to our Nation's economic prosperity, especially since aviation and related industries contribute $700 billion to the U.S. economy and encompass over 8 million jobs.

As I know very well from having worked closely with Administrator Jane Garvey on the FAA's year 2000 computer problem, safety remains the number one priority at the FAA.

Over the past 20 years, the aviation accident rate has dropped dramatically because of the introduction of new technologies and procedures that are developed through the collaborative research and development activities of both the FAA and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA.

As any frequent traveler can tell my colleagues, aviation congestion leading to delayed or canceled flights is becoming more common. The fact that aviation traffic is projected to double over the next 15 to 20 years compounds the problem. Investing in research and development today will give us the tools to meet the demands of the future.

Mr. Chairman, the authorization levels in H.R. 1551 ensure that the FAA has sufficient funding to carry out research and development in the areas of aircraft safety, system security, system capacity, and weather.

Also, H.R. 1551 allows the FAA to continue its work in human factors research. Human error is still the dominant cause of aviation accidents. As we continue to integrate automation into flying aircraft and controlling airspace, it is important that the FAA does a better job of understanding the changing human rules and responsibilities of pilots and controllers to provide them with equipment that better meets their needs.

Finally, I am pleased to point out that the legislation fully funds the administration's request for energy and environment research. This will allow the agency to continue working with NASA, to reach the goal they embarked on in 1992, to reduce aircraft noise by 80 percent in the year 2000.

Mr. Chairman, I also want to commend, again, the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. SENSENBRENNER), chairman of the Committee on Science, and the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. BARCIA), the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Technology for their assistance in crafting this bipartisan legislation.

The bill demonstrates a continued strong commitment to aviation research and development. I encourage all my colleagues to join me in supporting H.R. 1551. I also want to commend the staff who have worked very hard on this bill.

1:39 PM EDT

James Barcia, D-MI 5th

Mr. BARCIA. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, before beginning my remarks on H.R. 1551, I also would like to join the gentleman from Wisconsin (Chairman SENSENBRENNER) and the gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs. MORELLA) in pointing out to our colleagues that this is the first piece of legislation that the Committee on [Page: H8322]

Science has brought to the floor with the gentleman from Texas (Mr. HALL) as our ranking member. I look forward to working closely with the gentleman

from Texas, and I am sure that I can speak for all members of the Committee on Science in wishing him the very best in his new role.

Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of H.R. 1551, which authorizes fiscal year 2000 and fiscal year 2001 funding for the research and development activities for the Federal Aviation Administration. This legislation was developed on a true bipartisan basis. As always, it has been a pleasure and a privilege working with the gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs. MORELLA), chairman of the subcommittee, on this legislation. I also want to gratefully thank the gentleman from Wisconsin (Chairman SENSENBRENNER)

and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. HALL), the ranking member, for their leadership and efforts to bring this legislation to the floor today.

The primary impression of the Federal Aviation Administration is that it is a regulatory agency responsible for maintaining the safety of air travel and operating the Nation's air traffic control system. However, the basis for both safety and air traffic control can be found in FAA's research and development activities.

The Federal Aviation Administration's small research and development budget supports efforts to improve the air traffic control system to develop the concept of free flight, to conduct research on aging aircrafts, and to perform weather-related research, just to highlight a few areas of the FAA's efforts. The results of this research translate directly to improved safety and increased capacity of the national airspace system.

Both the gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs. MORELLA) and myself have been concerned that FAA's research and development budget submission does not present a comprehensive overview of its activities and priorities.

A letter earlier this year from the chairman of FAA's Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee supported our concerns. The chairman wrote:

With the research and development funding and responsibilities for implementation separated into so many different pots, the R&D management focus and effort has been seriously compromised.

The gentleman from Wisconsin (Chairman SENSENBRENNER) will offer an amendment to modify the authorizations in H.R. 1551, and I fully support this modification. This amendment removes some activities from H.R. 1551 which were included in the overall FAA authorization bill already considered by the House.

As a member of both the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure as well as the Committee on Science, I will continue to work with my colleagues on both committees to ensure that FAA's research and development is comprehensive and meets the needs of the aviation community and the safety of the flying public.

Mr. Chairman, H.R. 1551 funds important research programs that are necessary to the Federal Aviation Administration's efforts to modernize the national airspace system. I urge my colleagues to support this legislation.

Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. TRAFICANT).

1:43 PM EDT

James A. Traficant Jr., D-OH 17th

Mr. TRAFICANT. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman from Michigan for yielding me this time, knowing that he serves with me on the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

An amendment that I will be bringing calls and requires the Federal Aviation Administration to do research on the laser visual guidance systems. That amendment is at the desk. I just want to say this: most of the fatalities in aircraft landings and aircraft fatalities are due to the fact that, in certain weather conditions, planes simply miscalculate and miss the runway. This would call for research into the laser visual guidance system. The gentleman is familiar with it, and I just wanted to

apprise the committee of it.

1:44 PM EDT

Joe Crowley, D-NY 7th

Mr. CROWLEY. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of this bill, the Civil Aviation Research and Development Authorization Act, and to support research and development in the aviation industry.

Research and development is an important part of the aviation industry, bringing us safer and quieter planes. We have recently seen the implementation of Stage 3 planes, which are noticeably quieter than their earlier counterparts. However, as someone who lives close to an airport, I appreciate the need for further R&D to bring us quieter planes.

As a Representative of the 7th Congressional District of New York, containing LaGuardia Airport and its surrounding communities, I have pushed this Congress to press for the further study of Stage 4 aircraft.

Mr. Chairman, the airspace surrounding LaGuardia, JFK, and Newark airports is the busiest airspace in the world. The noise from the jets is deafening.

To quote one of my constituents, ``The noise has become so loud that I cannot watch TV, take a phone call, or even sleep.'' It is my hope, Mr. Chairman that through R&D efforts such as those authorized in this bill, individuals or families living near airports can get a decent night's sleep.

To further help with the R&D effort, my fellow Congressman from New York, Anthony Weiner, and I have introduced the Silent Skies Act. The Silent Skies Act would mandate quieter aircraft engines and call on the Department of Transportation to set the standards for Stage 4 aircraft, the next generation of quieter engines.

It also mandates that all aircraft be in compliance with Stage 4 noise levels no later than the year 2012. Mr. Chairman, I am confident that Stage 4 technology will dramatically improve the quality of life for residents of Queens and the Bronx, like myself, who live near LaGuardia airport.

[Time: 13:45]

I encourage all my colleagues to join as cosponsors of this important legislation to improve the quality of life for every constituent who lives near an airport.

In closing, I want to once again commend the aviation research and development process and urge the aviation industry and the Department of Transportation and this Congress to push for the development of quieter aircraft engines.

1:44 PM EDT

Joe Crowley, D-NY 7th

Mr. CROWLEY. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of this bill, the Civil Aviation Research and Development Authorization Act, and to support research and development in the aviation industry.

Research and development is an important part of the aviation industry, bringing us safer and quieter planes. We have recently seen the implementation of Stage 3 planes, which are noticeably quieter than their earlier counterparts. However, as someone who lives close to an airport, I appreciate the need for further R&D to bring us quieter planes.

As a Representative of the 7th Congressional District of New York, containing LaGuardia Airport and its surrounding communities, I have pushed this Congress to press for the further study of Stage 4 aircraft.

Mr. Chairman, the airspace surrounding LaGuardia, JFK, and Newark airports is the busiest airspace in the world. The noise from the jets is deafening.

To quote one of my constituents, ``The noise has become so loud that I cannot watch TV, take a phone call, or even sleep.'' It is my hope, Mr. Chairman that through R&D efforts such as those authorized in this bill, individuals or families living near airports can get a decent night's sleep.

To further help with the R&D effort, my fellow Congressman from New York, Anthony Weiner, and I have introduced the Silent Skies Act. The Silent Skies Act would mandate quieter aircraft engines and call on the Department of Transportation to set the standards for Stage 4 aircraft, the next generation of quieter engines.

It also mandates that all aircraft be in compliance with Stage 4 noise levels no later than the year 2012. Mr. Chairman, I am confident that Stage 4 technology will dramatically improve the quality of life for residents of Queens and the Bronx, like myself, who live near LaGuardia airport.

[Time: 13:45]

I encourage all my colleagues to join as cosponsors of this important legislation to improve the quality of life for every constituent who lives near an airport.

In closing, I want to once again commend the aviation research and development process and urge the aviation industry and the Department of Transportation and this Congress to push for the development of quieter aircraft engines.

1:46 PM EDT

James Sensenbrenner Jr., R-WI 9th

Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore (Mr. Quinn). All time for general debate has expired.

Pursuant to the rule, the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute printed in the bill shall be considered by section as an original bill for the purpose of amendment, and each section is considered read.

During consideration of the bill for amendment, the Chair may accord priority in recognition to a Member offering an amendment that he has printed in the designated place in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD. Those amendments will be considered read.

The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole may postpone a request for a recorded vote on any amendment and [Page: H8323]

may reduce to a minimum of 5 minutes the time for voting on any postponed question that immediately follows another vote, provided that the time for voting on the first question shall be a minimum of 15 minutes.

1:47 PM EDT

James Sensenbrenner Jr., R-WI 9th

Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore (Mr. Quinn). All time for general debate has expired.

Pursuant to the rule, the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute printed in the bill shall be considered by section as an original bill for the purpose of amendment, and each section is considered read.

During consideration of the bill for amendment, the Chair may accord priority in recognition to a Member offering an amendment that he has printed in the designated place in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD. Those amendments will be considered read.

The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole may postpone a request for a recorded vote on any amendment and [Page: H8323]

may reduce to a minimum of 5 minutes the time for voting on any postponed question that immediately follows another vote, provided that the time for voting on the first question shall be a minimum of 15 minutes.

1:47 PM EDT

James Sensenbrenner Jr., R-WI 9th

Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. The Clerk will designate the amendment.

The text of the amendment is as follows:

Amendment No. 4 offered by Mr. SENSENBRENNER:

Page 2, line 4, through page 3, line 25, amend section 2 to read as follows:

SEC. 2. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

Section 48102(a) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--

(1) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (4)(J);

(2) by striking the period at the end of paragraph (5) and inserting in lieu thereof a semicolon; and

(3) by adding at the end the following:

``(6) for fiscal year 2000, $208,416,100 including--

``(A) $17,269,000 for system development and infrastructure projects and activities;

``(B) $33,042,500 for capacity and air traffic management technology projects and activities;

``(C) $11,265,400 for communications, navigation, and surveillance projects and activities;

``(D) $15,765,000 for weather projects and activities;

``(E) $6,358,200 for airport technology projects and activities;

``(F) $39,639,000 for aircraft safety technology projects and activities;

``(G) $53,218,000 for system security technology projects and activities;

``(H) $26,207,000 for human factors and aviation medicine projects and activities;

``(I) $3,481,000 for environment and energy projects and activities; and

``(J) $2,171,000 for innovative/cooperative research projects and activities, of which $750,000 shall be for carrying out subsection (h) of this section; and

``(7) for fiscal year 2001, $222,950,000.''.