6:11 PM EDT

Connie Morella, R-MD 8th

Mrs. MORELLA. Mr. Chairman, I rise to support strongly the Gilman-Maloney-Morella amendment. It is a commonsense proposal. It is one I think that everybody in this House can wholeheartedly endorse.

Currently, Federal employees across the country undergo at the bare minimum a computer check on their background, which includes FBI, Interpol, [Page: H6671]

and police records. However, child care workers who enter these very same buildings on a daily basis do not. These individuals care for small children each day, and our Federal employees should be able to feel confident that they are leaving their children in a safe environment with qualified individuals.

Federal agencies have neglected to perform these background checks because these individuals are hired by the child care center, not the Federal government. But it only takes one missed background check to lead to a devastating situation.

We cannot afford to let that happen. I hope that Members will join me and the other authors of this amendment, the gentleman from New York (Mr. GILMAN) and the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. MALONEY), in supporting this amendment to the Treasury-Postal appropriations bill and close this loophole.

6:11 PM EDT

Benjamin Arthur Gilman, R-NY 20th

Mr. GILMAN. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, this amendment is slightly changed from my original amendment, listed as Amendment No. 2 in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, and contains language clarifying the definition of an ``executive facility.''

Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of the Gilman-Maloney-Morella amendment which seeks to close a loophole regarding the safety of child care in Federal facilities throughout our Nation. I would like to thank the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. MALONEY) and the gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs. MORELLA) for their support of this issue and their dedication to improving the quality of child care for all children.

Congress passed the Crime Control Act in 1990, including a provision calling for mandatory background checks for employees hired by a Federal agency. However, some agencies have interpreted that law in such a way that many child care employees are not subjected to background checks.

Currently, Federal employees across the Nation undergo, at the bare minimum, a computer check of their background which includes FBI, INTERPOL and State police records. However, some child care workers who enter these same buildings on a daily basis do not. Federal employees who use federally provided child care should feel confident that these child care providers have backgrounds free of abusive and violent behavior that would prevent them from working with our children.

Moreover, this amendment helps to ensure the overall safety of our Federal buildings. Child care workers step into Federal buildings each day and look after children of Federal employees. Without performing background checks, the children in day care, as well as the employees in Federal facilities, are exposing themselves to possible violent acts in the workplace. A child care worker, with a history of violent criminal behavior, has the opportunity to create a terrorist situation, the likes of

which have not been seen since the tragedy in Oklahoma City.

Child care providers working in Federal facilities throughout our Nation have somehow fallen through the cracks and have become exempt from undergoing a criminal history check. This amendment corrects that situation.

Mr. Chairman, I urge our colleagues to vote yes on the amendment.

Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. MALONEY).

[Time: 18:15]

6:11 PM EDT

Benjamin Arthur Gilman, R-NY 20th

Mr. GILMAN. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, this amendment is slightly changed from my original amendment, listed as Amendment No. 2 in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, and contains language clarifying the definition of an ``executive facility.''

Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of the Gilman-Maloney-Morella amendment which seeks to close a loophole regarding the safety of child care in Federal facilities throughout our Nation. I would like to thank the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. MALONEY) and the gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs. MORELLA) for their support of this issue and their dedication to improving the quality of child care for all children.

Congress passed the Crime Control Act in 1990, including a provision calling for mandatory background checks for employees hired by a Federal agency. However, some agencies have interpreted that law in such a way that many child care employees are not subjected to background checks.

Currently, Federal employees across the Nation undergo, at the bare minimum, a computer check of their background which includes FBI, INTERPOL and State police records. However, some child care workers who enter these same buildings on a daily basis do not. Federal employees who use federally provided child care should feel confident that these child care providers have backgrounds free of abusive and violent behavior that would prevent them from working with our children.

Moreover, this amendment helps to ensure the overall safety of our Federal buildings. Child care workers step into Federal buildings each day and look after children of Federal employees. Without performing background checks, the children in day care, as well as the employees in Federal facilities, are exposing themselves to possible violent acts in the workplace. A child care worker, with a history of violent criminal behavior, has the opportunity to create a terrorist situation, the likes of

which have not been seen since the tragedy in Oklahoma City.

Child care providers working in Federal facilities throughout our Nation have somehow fallen through the cracks and have become exempt from undergoing a criminal history check. This amendment corrects that situation.

Mr. Chairman, I urge our colleagues to vote yes on the amendment.

Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. MALONEY).

[Time: 18:15]

6:11 PM EDT

Benjamin Arthur Gilman, R-NY 20th

Mr. GILMAN. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, this amendment is slightly changed from my original amendment, listed as Amendment No. 2 in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, and contains language clarifying the definition of an ``executive facility.''

Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of the Gilman-Maloney-Morella amendment which seeks to close a loophole regarding the safety of child care in Federal facilities throughout our Nation. I would like to thank the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. MALONEY) and the gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs. MORELLA) for their support of this issue and their dedication to improving the quality of child care for all children.

Congress passed the Crime Control Act in 1990, including a provision calling for mandatory background checks for employees hired by a Federal agency. However, some agencies have interpreted that law in such a way that many child care employees are not subjected to background checks.

Currently, Federal employees across the Nation undergo, at the bare minimum, a computer check of their background which includes FBI, INTERPOL and State police records. However, some child care workers who enter these same buildings on a daily basis do not. Federal employees who use federally provided child care should feel confident that these child care providers have backgrounds free of abusive and violent behavior that would prevent them from working with our children.

Moreover, this amendment helps to ensure the overall safety of our Federal buildings. Child care workers step into Federal buildings each day and look after children of Federal employees. Without performing background checks, the children in day care, as well as the employees in Federal facilities, are exposing themselves to possible violent acts in the workplace. A child care worker, with a history of violent criminal behavior, has the opportunity to create a terrorist situation, the likes of

which have not been seen since the tragedy in Oklahoma City.

Child care providers working in Federal facilities throughout our Nation have somehow fallen through the cracks and have become exempt from undergoing a criminal history check. This amendment corrects that situation.

Mr. Chairman, I urge our colleagues to vote yes on the amendment.

Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. MALONEY).

[Time: 18:15]