6:51 PM EDT

Charles B. Rangel, D-NY 15th

Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. The Clerk will designate the amendment.

The text of the amendment is as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. RANGEL:

At the end of the bill, insert after the last section (page 112, after line 13) the following new section:

SEC. 644. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used by the Department of the Treasury to enforce the economic embargo of Cuba, as defined in section 4(7) of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-114), except those provisions that relate to the denial of foreign tax credits, or to the implementation of the harmonized tariff schedule of the United States.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL) and a Member opposed each will control 10 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL).

6:51 PM EDT

Charles B. Rangel, D-NY 15th

Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. The Clerk will designate the amendment.

The text of the amendment is as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. RANGEL:

At the end of the bill, insert after the last section (page 112, after line 13) the following new section:

SEC. 644. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used by the Department of the Treasury to enforce the economic embargo of Cuba, as defined in section 4(7) of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-114), except those provisions that relate to the denial of foreign tax credits, or to the implementation of the harmonized tariff schedule of the United States.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL) and a Member opposed each will control 10 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL).

6:51 PM EDT

Charles B. Rangel, D-NY 15th

Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. The Clerk will designate the amendment.

The text of the amendment is as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. RANGEL:

At the end of the bill, insert after the last section (page 112, after line 13) the following new section:

SEC. 644. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used by the Department of the Treasury to enforce the economic embargo of Cuba, as defined in section 4(7) of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-114), except those provisions that relate to the denial of foreign tax credits, or to the implementation of the harmonized tariff schedule of the United States.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL) and a Member opposed each will control 10 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL).

6:51 PM EDT

Charles B. Rangel, D-NY 15th

Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. The Clerk will designate the amendment.

The text of the amendment is as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. RANGEL:

At the end of the bill, insert after the last section (page 112, after line 13) the following new section:

SEC. 644. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used by the Department of the Treasury to enforce the economic embargo of Cuba, as defined in section 4(7) of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-114), except those provisions that relate to the denial of foreign tax credits, or to the implementation of the harmonized tariff schedule of the United States.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL) and a Member opposed each will control 10 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL).

6:51 PM EDT

Charles B. Rangel, D-NY 15th

Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. The Clerk will designate the amendment.

The text of the amendment is as follows:

Amendment offered by Mr. RANGEL:

At the end of the bill, insert after the last section (page 112, after line 13) the following new section:

SEC. 644. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used by the Department of the Treasury to enforce the economic embargo of Cuba, as defined in section 4(7) of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-114), except those provisions that relate to the denial of foreign tax credits, or to the implementation of the harmonized tariff schedule of the United States.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL) and a Member opposed each will control 10 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York (Mr. RANGEL).

6:51 PM EDT

Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-NJ 11th

Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, the intent of my amendment is quite simple. Government Web sites exist to serve the public. They should not be used to collect personal information about people who use these sites, unless the public chooses to disclose personal information to the government.

Recent news reports reveal that some Federal agency Web sites are placing what are called ``cookies'' on the personal computers of people who view and access government Web sites. This cookie technology basically allows the operator of a Web site to follow users around as they visit the site, and has the potential to continue to follow that user around after they have left the site.

I think that the use of this cookie technology on government Web sites raises many serious questions. For instance, do we really want the Federal Government to keep information on a user that tells them what page on the National Institutes of Health site the user looked up; how many times the user looked at the site; what time the user visited the site; what information the user downloaded from the site; and where the user went on the Web after they left that particular site? More important,

why are they collecting this information? What are they using it for? What could this information be used for? Could it be misused? And, most especially, under what force of law do these agencies have the right to collect this information?

In response to the public outcry about government Web sites using cookies, the Federal Office of Management and Budget did issue a policy directive on June 22 of this year. And while it is a step in the right direction, let me just quote from the directive, which states, ``Under this new Federal policy, cookies should not be used at Federal Web sites unless in addition to clear and conspicuous notice the following conditions are met: A compelling need to collect data on the site, appropriate

and publicly disclosed privacy safeguards, and personal approval by the head of the agency.''

Mr. Chairman, one agency's idea of what they call a ``compelling need'' may very well be in violation of my constituents' privacy. I do not think we want to put these decisions in the hands of every agency head, nor do I think we want privacy protections that vary from agency to agency. We need this time out, or moratorium, where agencies are barred from using these technologies until we have a government-wide consistent policy under force of law that provides the necessary protections against

the unintentional and involuntary collection of people's personal information.

Mr. Chairman, I know that this is a whole new arena for all of us in government as well as in the private sector, [Page: H6685]

and we need the time to sort it through. I look forward to working with the chairman and others in Congress on this very important issue.

6:54 PM EDT

Jim Kolbe, R-AZ 5th

Mr. KOLBE. Mr. Chairman, I want to commend the gentleman for the amendment he has offered. Members of this body have been working closely with the gentleman from New Jersey and his staff for some time on this.

I think the gentleman has raised an important issue and, as he suggests here, we really need to have a consistent government-wide policy on the use of gathering information about people who are on the Internet and who seek access to Internet sites, including government sites. So I commend him for what he is doing. We do have some concerns that we have talked to him about the way his amendment is drafted, but we think we can work those out.

Members will also note this is the second amendment on this topic that we have had here tonight. The gentleman from Washington offered one which proceeds from the presumption that Internet access is being looked at and he asked to study it. This one proceeds from the idea that cookies should not be used. I think that is the appropriate way to look at this for the moment.

So I commend the gentleman for offering this amendment and thank him for yielding.

6:55 PM EDT

Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-NJ 11th

Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Reclaiming my time, Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for his comments.

The CHAIRMAN pro tempore. Does anyone claim the time in opposition?

If not, the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN).

The amendment was agreed to.

AMENDMENT OFFERED BY MR. RANGEL