8:28 PM EDT

Lynn Woolsey, D-CA 6th

Ms. WOOLSEY. Mr. Chairman, it makes good sense to have the OPM study the best ways to give Federal employees paid leave following the birth or adoption of a child, and to study the effect paid leave will have on the Federal work force, because it then can be a model for the rest of the country.

Today if a child is fortunate enough to have two parents living with them, chances are that both parents work long hours and commute long distances. So then we have to ask the question, who is taking care of our children? Compared to 33 years ago, parents spend 52 fewer days a year with their children. That is almost one day a week.

[Time: 20:30]

We must do something to help parents bridge the gap between work and family, especially when they have a new baby. The Maloney-Gilman-Hoyer amendment is a good first step that will let American parents respond to the question, who is taking care of our children? Then we can have a simple answer. That answer can be we all are.

8:31 PM EDT

Elijah Cummings, D-MD 7th

Mr. CUMMINGS. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding me this time.

I stand today, Mr. Chairman, to support this amendment to require OPM to conduct a study on alternative means to provide Federal employees with at least 6 weeks of paid parental leave in connection with the birth or adoption of a child.

I am an original cosponsor of H.R. 4567, which would provide that at least half of any leave taken by a Federal employee for the birth, adoption, or placement of a child be paid leave. Parenting is a key component to a child's development and eventual success in and contribution to a society.

In 1993, the President signed the Family Medical Leave Act providing Federal workers with up to 12 weeks of unpaid job-protected leave for childbirth or adoption, which has benefited more than 20 million Americans. However, parents need more support to help balance their family and work responsibilities.

A recent poll released by the National Parenting Association found that low-income parents and parents of very young children are the least likely to be able to take family leave due to the loss of income.

Therefore, Mr. Chairman, I support this amendment.

8:31 PM EDT

Elijah Cummings, D-MD 7th

Mr. CUMMINGS. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding me this time.

I stand today, Mr. Chairman, to support this amendment to require OPM to conduct a study on alternative means to provide Federal employees with at least 6 weeks of paid parental leave in connection with the birth or adoption of a child.

I am an original cosponsor of H.R. 4567, which would provide that at least half of any leave taken by a Federal employee for the birth, adoption, or placement of a child be paid leave. Parenting is a key component to a child's development and eventual success in and contribution to a society.

In 1993, the President signed the Family Medical Leave Act providing Federal workers with up to 12 weeks of unpaid job-protected leave for childbirth or adoption, which has benefited more than 20 million Americans. However, parents need more support to help balance their family and work responsibilities.

A recent poll released by the National Parenting Association found that low-income parents and parents of very young children are the least likely to be able to take family leave due to the loss of income.

Therefore, Mr. Chairman, I support this amendment.