1:21 PM EDT

Doc Hastings, R-WA 4th

Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Speaker, for the purpose of the debate only, I yield the customary 30 minutes to the distinguished gentleman from Ohio (Mr. HALL), pending which I yield myself such time as I may consume. During consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purposes of debate only.

Mr. Speaker, H. Res. 289 would grant H.R. 1655, the Department of Energy Research, Development and Demonstration Authorization Act of 1999, an open rule. The rule provides for 1 hour of general debate to be equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on Science.

The rule provides that the bill shall be open to amendment by section, and it allows the Chairman of the Committee of the Whole to accord priority in and recognition to Members who have preprinted their amendments in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD.

The rule also allows the Chairman of the Committee of the Whole to postpone votes during consideration of the bill and to reduce voting time to 5 minutes on a postponed question if the vote follows a 15-minute vote. Finally, the rule provides one motion to recommit, with or without instructions.

Mr. Speaker, the Department of Energy, Research Development and Demonstration Authorization Act of 1999 authorizes the civilian energy and scientific research and development programs of the Department of Energy for fiscal years 2000 and 2001. The bill was reported favorably by the Committee on Science by a vote of 31-to-1.

Basic scientific research is the source of the new technologies and industries that will drive our Nation's economy in the next century. If America is to continue to enjoy a rising standard of living and a healthy economy, the United States must continue to be a leader in basic scientific research. The Federal Government has long had an important role to play in supporting these research programs, many of which are far too expensive for any single company or institution to support. H.R. 1655

recognizes the need for an aggressive research effort at the department of energy which has the third largest basic research program in the Federal Government, exceeded only by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.

Specifically, Mr. Speaker, over the next 2 years, the bill would authorize $885 million for research on energy supply; $5.2 billion for energy physics and science; $825 million for fossil energy research and development; and $1 billion for energy conservation research. Furthermore, it should be noted that the Committee on Science has provided clear direction to the Department of Energy that this funding be awarded based on merit and should be used to fund research, not departmental administration.

Finally, the Congressional Budget Office estimates that H.R. 1655 would cost approximately $8 billion in budget authority and $8.25 billion in outlays over the next 2 years.

The Committee on Rules was pleased to grant the request of the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. SENSENBRENNER), the chairman of the Committee on Science, for an open rule on H.R. 1655, and accordingly, I encourage my colleagues to support both H. Res. 289 and the underlying bill.

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

[Time: 13:15]

1:21 PM EDT

Doc Hastings, R-WA 4th

Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Speaker, House Resolution 290 would grant H.R. 1551, the Civil Aviation Research and Development Authorization Act of 1999, an open rule.

The rule provides for 1 hour of general debate, equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on Science. The rule provides that the bill shall be open to amendment by section, and allows the chairman of the Committee of the Whole to accord priority in recognition to Members who have preprinted their amendments in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD.

The rule also allows the chairman of the Committee of the Whole to postpone votes during consideration of the bill, and to reduce voting time to 5 minutes on a postponed question, if the vote follows a 15-minute vote.

Finally, the rule provides 1 motion to recommit, with or without instructions.

Mr. Speaker, the Civil Aviation Research and Development Authorization Act of 1991 would authorize the Federal Aviation Administration to conduct research and development activities during fiscal years 2000 and 2001. The current authorization is scheduled to expire at the end of fiscal year 1999.

Our Nation's air traffic system has seen a dramatic increase in use in recent years. This legislation, introduced by the gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs. MORELLA), makes it possible to keep pace with rising aviation volumes and maintain an effective air traffic system.

The FAA's research and development activities help produce the cutting edge technology necessary to ensure the safety, efficiency, and security of our national air transportation system. In addition, this bill makes it easier for Congress to track overall FAA research activities and to better assess priorities for modernization.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that enactment of H.R. 1551 would cost approximately $1.32 billion in budget authority and $1.3 billion in outlays. Because the bill does not affect direct spending, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.

Mr. Speaker, the Committee on Rules was pleased to grant the request of the gentleman from Wisconsin (Chairman SENSENBRENNER) for an open rule on H.R. 1551, providing Members seeking to improve this bill the fullest opportunity to offer their amendments on the floor.

Accordingly, I urge my colleagues to support both House Resolution 290 and the underlying bill.

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time. [Page: H8320]

1:24 PM EDT

Tony P. Hall, D-OH 3rd

Mr. HALL of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Speaker, this is an open rule. It will allow for full and fair debate on H.R. 1551, which is the Civilian Aviation Research and Development Authorization Act of 1999.

As my colleague, the gentleman from Washington (Mr. HASTINGS) has described, this rule will provide for 1 hour of general debate. It would be equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on Science.

The rule permits amendments under the 5-minute rule. This is the normal amending process in the House. All Members on both sides of the aisle will have the opportunity to offer germane amendments.

The bill authorizes $1.32 billion in fiscal years 2000 and 2001 for the Federal Aviation Administration's civil aviation research and development programs. The bill funds a wide range of aviation-related research, including aircraft safety, communications, equipment, and facilities.

The bill also funds research aimed at reducing aircraft noise. Unfortunately, the FAA has not placed a sufficient priority on research to identify technologies that could be used to develop quieter aircraft, or to reduce the effects of aircraft noise on neighborhoods near airports.

In my district, residents of the city of Centerville, Ohio, have been plagued with aircraft noise ever since flight patterns were shifted over the city. This is a particular problem since many of the aircraft carry cargo at night or early in the morning. Daily between 4 a.m. and 7 a.m., when most people are trying to sleep, a plane flies overhead every few minutes. It is like sleeping under an aircraft superhighway.

The problems facing my constituents in Ohio are similar to problems all over America, and these will only get worse as the skies get more and more crowded nationwide. I urge the FAA to increase research aimed at reducing aircraft noise. I also urge the FAA to examine the ways that aircraft noise affects the health and safety of people who experience it on a regular basis.

In particular, I request that the FAA study the health effects of nighttime aircraft noise, such as the noise experienced by the citizens of Centerville. By working with citizens and government and industry as partners, we can address this problem.

Mr. Speaker, the funding in this bill is an investment in the future of our aviation transportation. As the representative from Dayton, Ohio, the home of the Wright Brothers, I am proud of America's leadership in aviation technology. This bill will help maintain our leadership role.

This is an open rule. It was adopted by a voice vote of the Committee on Rules, and I urge adoption of the rule.

Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Youngstown, Ohio (Mr. TRAFICANT).

1:24 PM EDT

Tony P. Hall, D-OH 3rd

Mr. HALL of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Speaker, this is an open rule. It will allow for full and fair debate on H.R. 1551, which is the Civilian Aviation Research and Development Authorization Act of 1999.

As my colleague, the gentleman from Washington (Mr. HASTINGS) has described, this rule will provide for 1 hour of general debate. It would be equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on Science.

The rule permits amendments under the 5-minute rule. This is the normal amending process in the House. All Members on both sides of the aisle will have the opportunity to offer germane amendments.

The bill authorizes $1.32 billion in fiscal years 2000 and 2001 for the Federal Aviation Administration's civil aviation research and development programs. The bill funds a wide range of aviation-related research, including aircraft safety, communications, equipment, and facilities.

The bill also funds research aimed at reducing aircraft noise. Unfortunately, the FAA has not placed a sufficient priority on research to identify technologies that could be used to develop quieter aircraft, or to reduce the effects of aircraft noise on neighborhoods near airports.

In my district, residents of the city of Centerville, Ohio, have been plagued with aircraft noise ever since flight patterns were shifted over the city. This is a particular problem since many of the aircraft carry cargo at night or early in the morning. Daily between 4 a.m. and 7 a.m., when most people are trying to sleep, a plane flies overhead every few minutes. It is like sleeping under an aircraft superhighway.

The problems facing my constituents in Ohio are similar to problems all over America, and these will only get worse as the skies get more and more crowded nationwide. I urge the FAA to increase research aimed at reducing aircraft noise. I also urge the FAA to examine the ways that aircraft noise affects the health and safety of people who experience it on a regular basis.

In particular, I request that the FAA study the health effects of nighttime aircraft noise, such as the noise experienced by the citizens of Centerville. By working with citizens and government and industry as partners, we can address this problem.

Mr. Speaker, the funding in this bill is an investment in the future of our aviation transportation. As the representative from Dayton, Ohio, the home of the Wright Brothers, I am proud of America's leadership in aviation technology. This bill will help maintain our leadership role.

This is an open rule. It was adopted by a voice vote of the Committee on Rules, and I urge adoption of the rule.

Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Youngstown, Ohio (Mr. TRAFICANT).