10:10 AM EST

John A. Boehner, R-OH 8th

Mr. BOEHNER. Madam Speaker and my colleagues, today we are called here to mourn.

An unspeakable act of violence has taken six innocent lives, and left several more--including our colleague, Gabrielle Giffords--battling for theirs. These are difficult hours for our country.

Among the fallen is Gabe Zimmerman, a member of Congresswoman Giffords' staff--a public servant of the highest caliber--one of our own. Even in our shock, we are composed and determined to fulfill our calling to represent our constituents. This is the great cause for which Gabe gave his life.

Like us, Gabe swore an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution. At the time of the attack, he was engaged in the most simple and direct of democratic rituals: listening to the people, listening to his neighbors.

The brutality that shattered Saturday morning's calm was devastating, but brief. Bravery and quick thinking prevented a larger massacre, turning innocent bystanders into heroes.

The service and skill of first responders and medical professionals saved lives. Law enforcement officials are working to ensure swift justice. Look to Tucson right now, and you will be reminded that America's most plentiful source of wealth and strength is her people.

We are so thankful Gabby is still with us. We are so thankful that two of her staffers who were also wounded--Ron Barber and Pam Simon--are still with us as well.

In her stead, Gabby's staff has pressed on, opening for business Monday morning right on schedule. The men and women who faithfully serve the people of Arizona's 8th Congressional District have signaled that no act--no matter how heinous--will stop us from doing our duty and being among the people we serve.

To all of the dedicated professionals that we rely on to make this institution work, to each of you: thank you for what you do. And to Gabby's staff--and their families: please know that our hearts and prayers go out to each of you. [Page: H145]

This body has yet to fully register the magnitude of this tragedy. We feel a litany of unwanted emotions no resolution could possibly capture.

We know that we gather here without distinction of party. The needs of this institution have always risen above partisanship. And what this institution needs right now is strength--holy, uplifting strength. The strength to grieve with the families of the fallen, to pray for the wounded, and to chart a way forward, no matter how painful and difficult it may be.

Today it is not ceremony, but tragedy that stirs us to renew our commitment to faithfully fulfill our oath of office. Let us not let this inhuman act frighten us into doing otherwise.

The free exchange of ideas is the lifeblood of our democracy, as prescribed by the First Amendment, that beacon of free expression Congresswoman Giffords recited in this well just days ago.

These rights have not been handed down by dictate; they have been preserved and protected through generations of hard sacrifice and commitment. We will continue that unfinished work.

We will do it for Christina Taylor Green, Dorothy Morris, Phyllis Schneck, and Dorwan Stoddard, ordinary citizens who died participating in their democracy. And we will do it for Judge John Roll. And we will do it for Gabe Zimmerman. And we will do it for--and God willing, with--Gabrielle Giffords.

Our hearts are broken, but our spirit is not. This is a time for the House to lock arms in prayer for those fallen and the wounded, and in resolve to carry on the dialogue of democracy.

We may not yet have all the answers, but we already have the answer that matters most: that we are Americans, and together we will make it through this difficult period. We will have the last word.

God bless this House. God bless this Congress. And God bless America.

10:16 AM EST

Nancy Pelosi, D-CA 8th

Ms. PELOSI. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding, and extend my condolences to him, Mr. Pastor, the senior member of the Arizona delegation, and to all of the members of the Arizona delegation.

Madam Speaker, I am saddened, greatly saddened, to join the Speaker of the House, Mr. Boehner, in coming together in sadness today to share our prayers and indeed our hopes for those who have lost so much because of the tragedy in Arizona involving our colleague, Congresswoman Gabby Giffords, her staff, and innocent bystanders.

Words are inadequate at a time like this, but I hope it is a comfort to those who have lost loved ones or who were injured on Saturday that so many people mourn the losses but also pray for the survivors and care for them at this very difficult time.

I think the resolution in its description of what happened and the context with which it happened is an excellent resolution; and I hope people will read it, pray over it, and be grateful that we have this opportunity to comment on it.

Today, we will say many prayers for our country and for the victims of this horrific event. We think of our colleague, Congresswoman Gabby Giffords, fighting to recover, and the 14 others who were injured and remember the six who were killed. Their names are mentioned, and they are described in the resolution. The Speaker has mentioned their names, but I think acknowledging them bears repetition.

How do you explain the death of 9-year-old Christina Taylor Green who had recently been elected to the student council in her school, Mesa Verde Elementary School, and the unbearable grief of John and Roxanna Green? Again, we pray for them and will carry Christina as an inspiration in our hearts.

Dorothy Morris was married for more than 50 years to her high school sweetheart and was the mother of two.

Federal Judge John Roll had just come from mass, which he attended every day.

Phyllis Schneck, mother of three, grandmother of seven, and a great-grandmother. And I know that the New Yorkers like to hear she was a Giants fan, snowbird in Arizona carrying that dedication west.

Dorwan Stoddard died shielding his wife, Mavy. Shielding his wife, Mavy.

And as has been mentioned in the resolution, and we have mourned, Congresswoman Gabby Giffords' director of community outreach, Gabriel Matthew Zimmerman. One of his colleagues, his coworker, said: ``Gabe helped people for a living.''

As we honor the heroes who risked their lives to protect others, among them some who were injured, Patricia Maisch, for one, who grabbed the full magazine of ammunition from the killer as he attempted to reload. Just think of how many more we could have lost.

Roger Sulzgeber and Joseph Zimudio tackled and subdued the suspect. Imagine the courage.

[Time: 10:20]

And Daniel Hernandez, Jr., 20 years old--an intern who had just been on the job for 4 days. When he heard gunshots, he ran toward them--he ran toward them--and attended to Congresswoman Giffords, helping to staunch her bleeding with his own hands.

We pray for the recovery of other members of Congresswoman Giffords' staff--Ron Barber, Pam Simon. We commend Pia Carusone and the entire GIFFORDS staff for carrying on.

Those heroes at the scene were joined by first responders from county and municipalities, arriving just 3 minutes after the first 911 call, who performed excellently, and in doing so, saved lives. We also pay tribute to the skilled professionals at Arizona's University Medical Center, whose role is ongoing in healing the victims of this tragedy.

Tonight, the University of Arizona community joins with Tucson, the State of Arizona and, indeed, the entire Nation to acknowledge together Saturday's tragedy. Appropriately, this remembrance is called ``Together we thrive: Tucson and America.''

``Together we thrive: Tucson and America'' will be an opportunity to grieve, and it will be a demonstration of our strength: a strength in community--a strength in community that was demonstrated last Saturday, a strength in community there that is ongoing. Tucson demonstrated its strength on Saturday when the city was full of heroes--ordinary citizens, victims, first responders--coming together in the spirit of community.

Madam Speaker, our colleague Congresswoman Giffords was the primary target of this cowardly act; and as she recovers, we honor her as a brilliant and courageous Member of Congress. She has brought to Congress an invigoration--the thinking of a new generation of national leaders. As a businesswoman and State legislator, she came to Congress full of ideas, and we will long continue to be blessed by them. I look forward to when she is present with us on the floor. She has spoken out courageously

and led boldly when the times have demanded it.

It is especially tragic that those who lost their lives and those who were wounded had come together, as the resolution presents, to participate in an activity that reflects the best of our democratic tradition--a Representative of the people, of GABBY GIFFORDS and her staff hearing directly from the men and women she represents.

American democracy is founded on our commitment to a contest of ideas, not violence. Political disagreement and dissent must never violate our Nation's values, as expressed in the Constitution, of free expression, speech and peaceful assembly. GABBY spoke to that right here from the floor last week.

In this hour of anguish, we seek a renewed commitment to hope, to civility, to peace among the American people. In many of our churches, we sing on Sunday and on other days of the week: let there be peace on Earth, and let it begin, not just with us but with me--with each of us, within each of us.

In speaking as one House today, coming together in peace, we offer our thoughts and support, our prayers for the health of our colleague, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, and for all of the injured. We share the stories of the heroes of this tragedy and mourn those who perished. Let their actions and their memories be a blessing to our country.

We don't know why God saw this to be necessary, but let this be something that we cherish as an opportunity as we mourn the heartbreaking horror of [Page: H146]

it all. This resolution is a fitting tribute. It is a great resolution. Please read it again and again. Carry those names in your heart. Remember each of these people because, again, a tragic accident took lives and wounded people in the free expression of ideas. May this resolution remind us of the urgent

need to uphold our democratic values, to treat one another with courtesy and with respect, and to act as Congresswoman Giffords has always done and always will do--in a manner that reflects the best of American leadership.

As our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of all who were affected, I want to call special attention to Commander, Navy Captain Mark Kelly, GABBY's husband, who has been a source of strength to all of us in this difficult time. We pray for him. We thank him for his and GABBY's service to our country. God truly blessed America with their leadership, with their service, and with their love for each other.

10:26 AM EST

Eric Cantor, R-VA 7th

Mr. CANTOR. I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Madam Speaker, this week, most Members of the House will gather briefly here in Washington, but our hearts and spirits will be in Arizona. The unspeakable tragedy in Tucson last Saturday came as a complete shock, casting a pall over the entire Nation.

With this resolution, we join 300 million Americans and millions of others around the world in showing our solidarity with Congresswoman Giffords and the rest of the victims. GABBY serves Arizona's Eighth District with distinction and thoughtful leadership, and we are all praying for her speedy recovery.

Saturday's cowardly crime was more than just an attack on dozens of innocent Americans at a grocery store. It was an attack on the very essence of democracy and representative government--an assault on the open exchange of ideas between legislators and the people to whom they are accountable.

This resolution honors the memory of Christina Taylor Green, Dorothy Morris, Judge John Roll, Phyllis Schneck, Dorwan Stoddard, and Gabriel Zimmerman. The slain represent a broad cross-section of the American public--young and old; men, women and child; friends, brothers, sisters, and children. They will be missed but not forgotten.

This inexplicable crime reminds us that there is evil in the world. Yet, as we look for light in a thicket of darkness, our Nation has drawn inspiration from the bravery and quick thinking displayed by the heroes on the scene. Were it not for their efforts, there likely would have been many more victims.

The outpouring of support, prayer, and solidarity also reminds us that America is a country of compassion, community, and empathy. We will stand with the victims and their families, and pray and mourn with them as they cope with this horrific tragedy.

Madam Speaker, I also want to offer my thoughts of comfort to GABBY GIFFORDS' staff and want them to know that our hearts hang heavy, and our thoughts and prayers are with them as they try and persevere through this very difficult time.

I would also like to add my thanks to the brave law enforcement that has helped our Nation over the last several days and every day--the law enforcement under the directorship of Director Mueller of the FBI, the local law enforcement in Arizona and, from our perspective, most especially, the Capitol Police, the Office of the Sergeant at Arms and the Sergeant at Arms, himself--for the tremendous job that they are undergoing each and every minute as we try and cope with this tragedy.

Madam Speaker, this resolution affirms the point all of us want to make. Our hearts are heavy. We mourn with the victims, and I urge my colleagues to support it.

[Time: 10:30]

Madam Speaker, I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Flake), and I ask unanimous consent that he be permitted to control that time.

10:29 AM EST

Steny Hoyer, D-MD 5th

Mr. HOYER. I thank the gentleman from Arizona for yielding.

Madam Speaker, this week, we pause the work of the House to mourn the lost lives of six of our fellow citizens--one of those born on that day of tragedy and carnage when thousands were slain in an equally indiscriminate, heinous act of hate--citizens shot dead on Saturday in Tucson in pursuit of the ``right to peaceably assemble,'' the amendment which GABBY GIFFORDS read on this floor. We come as well to honor those who risked their lives to save others, to pray for the lives of the wounded,

and to pray for our colleague and friend, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

Today, this temple of representative democracy is a sadder place. But Congresswoman Giffords' intelligence and her toughness, her public spirit and her charm will, God willing, and with the extraordinary medical care she is receiving, soon return to this body and again be a practitioner and a model for the principles of civil debate and thoughtful deliberation on which this temple is founded.

Congresswoman Giffords was attacked doing the work that is the heart of democracy, as has been so eloquently observed by our Speaker, Mr. Boehner: Listening to her neighbors, listening to those who sent her here to Washington to reflect their views.

Each one of us have done that work. Each one of us has come back bearing their fears and their hopes, their convictions and their visions for the future. Some, of course, are everyday hopes; some are matters of life and death. But in each case, we bring these hopes here and speak to our neighbors as best we can. That is what Congresswoman Giffords was doing.

We do not know, of course, the specific motive which led the perpetrator of this crime to act, nor can we draw conclusions as to specific causes, but it seems to me it is a time for us to reflect on the heightened anger being projected on our public debate and the daily denigration of those with whom we disagree. And it is appropriate, therefore, that the wrenching, shocking, senseless violence of that day compel us to reflect on our own responsibility to temper our words and respect those with

whom we disagree, lest the failure to do so give incitement to the angriest and most unstable among us.

Let us speak for our neighbors in a spirit of unity, not a false and shallow unity, not a unity that wishes away our differences or our discords, but a unity founded on our reverence for our democracy's most precious, most fragile gift--its power to resolve without violence our weightiest questions.

In a much darker time than ours, from the edge of a great war, President Lincoln addressed these words to the men and women whom, even in the war's depths, he refused to see as anything other than his fellow Americans. He said this: ``We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection.''

There are, in every society and in every culture and every nation, those who reflect that creed, but if we love our country, if we honor our oath to country, Constitution, and to our Nation of laws, we must live by those words. There is, perhaps, nothing we can do that will prevent the mindless violence committed by the few, but we can and must appeal to the best instincts of the many.

To the families of the fallen, we extend our sympathy. To the survivors, we extend our prayers for a full and speedy recovery. And to our colleague, to our beloved colleague, GABBY, we extend our love and our hopes for her early return to the Chamber and our ranks.

All of us in this time have come together, reached out to one another, comforted one another, and lifted one another up. May that sentiment not pass quickly from this body or from this country.

10:35 AM EST

Jeff Flake, R-AZ 6th

Mr. FLAKE. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

I want to thank Speaker Boehner and the leadership on both sides of the aisle for bringing this resolution to the floor. This is indeed Congress at its best.

None of us will ever forget the feeling we had when we heard the news of the shooting last Saturday--one of the victims which was our dear friend and colleague, Gabby Giffords. A few hours [Page: H147]

after the first news broke, I was in attendance at the press conference in Tucson at the medical center. Amid the turmoil and the anguish of the occasion, there were audible expressions of joy and relief around that room and around the country when Dr. Rhee

announced that Gabby could listen and respond. Gabby's progress over the past few days has been measured in much the same manner--the squeeze of a hand, the raising of two fingers, a thumbs-up sign, each gesture letting us know that she hears, that she is listening and responding. These traits, listening and responding, have defined Gabby Giffords' career as a legislator.

Let me give but one example borne of another tragedy just 10 months ago. Longtime Arizonan Bob Krentz, known to provide assistance to those he found in need, was murdered on his ranch near Arizona's southern border. Farmers and ranchers in Arizona were understandably alarmed. Gabby listened and responded. Over and over she contacted and visited those affected, reassuring them that help was on its way. She convened monthly conference calls for the farming and ranching communities involving

the Border Patrol, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Justice Department and other Federal agencies, each month broadening the circle to include more stakeholders.

We learned of her efforts in delegation meetings here in Washington, where she enlisted additional support. Last August, much as a result of Gabby's persistent efforts, the Congress acted, providing unprecedented resources to improve security in the area. Gabby listened, she responded, and, in the end, Congress responded as well.

We are responding here today by giving thanks for the service of Federal Judge John Roll and Gabe Zimmerman for the public service they have rendered. We are responding today by recognizing the heroic lifesaving efforts of people like Daniel Hernandez, who delivered aid to Congresswoman Giffords; to those who tackled the gunman; to Dorwan Stoddard, who shielded his wife from the gunfire, selflessly giving his own life that she might live. We are responding today by joining John and Roxanna

Green in mourning the loss of their 9-year-old daughter, Christina, as well as the friends and families of Dorothy Morris and Phyllis Schneck.

We in the Arizona delegation are proud of the wonderful State that we, together with more than 6 million of our friends and neighbors, call home. Arizona is defined not by the actions of a lone crazed gunman, but by the heroism and bravery of those who left us on Saturday and those, like our friend and colleague, Gabby Giffords, who will continue to lead us in the future.

Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

10:39 AM EST

John B. Larson, D-CT 1st

Mr. LARSON of Connecticut. I thank the gentleman from Arizona.

Shakespeare tells us in Othello that when Iago whispers mistruths in the ear of Othello, something beautiful dies.

[Time: 10:40]

Something beautiful died in Tucson, Arizona, this past Saturday. People who came to an event, to hear their congresswoman speak--one little girl, 9 years old--all beautiful, all celebrating the great beauty and majesty of our democracy, passed on that day.

Who knows what mistruths were bouncing around in the head of the assassin. Who could know that? But something beautiful died. Democracy died just a little that day.

But beauty has a way of coming back. It resides in people like Gabrielle Giffords. She epitomizes all that is good and rich about serving in the United States Congress. From her very demeanor, to her graciousness, to the way she carried herself in committee, with her legislation, and how she held forth with her constituents in an accountable manner that has become so much a fabric of our democracy--our Congress on the Corner.

She truly is a beautiful person. And that beauty had others responding that day with acts of heroism that have already been recounted on this floor. And that beauty lies with her husband by her side and with the fervent prayers of a Nation in hope, knowing and feeling confident that she will return from this awful incident and be back here with us gracing us with her beauty and dignity and vision and purpose.

One of her last remarks, in speaking to Mr. Trey Grayson, director of the Harvard Institute of Politics, was to say, I would love to talk about what we can do to promote centrism and moderation. I think we need to figure out how to tone down our rhetoric and the partisanship that exists here.

10:43 AM EST

Trent Franks, R-AZ 2nd

Mr. FRANKS of Arizona. I thank the gentleman.

Madam Speaker, the tragedy this week in Arizona has been a reminder to all of us of the brevity and delicate nature of this earthly life. It is my prayer this morning that God would grant all of the victims named in this resolution, as well as the grieving families and loved ones who are mourning the loss of the six precious lives that were taken that day, the comfort, the peace, and the restoration that only He can give.

Madam Speaker, it happens that the only one of those victims that I knew well personally was our own Gabby Giffords. Madam Speaker, Gabby and I are from different parties. And on past and happier days, many in Arizona would often joke about the differences in our politics.

But I can testify to you this morning, Madam Speaker, that in the 4 years that I have known Gabby Giffords there has never been one unkind or acrimonious or even terse word passed between us.

Gabby Giffords is a precious, warm, caring, decent human being whose warmth and charm touched the hearts of all who know her. And the testimony of her life and work is proof that true tolerance is not in pretending that we have no differences; it is being kind and decent to each other in spite of those differences.

And it strikes me as more than a poignant coincidence that only days before the tragedy, we all listened to Gabby Giffords as she stood at this very podium and read the words of the Constitution's First Amendment, which protects the right of the people to peaceably assemble.

And then only days later, Madam Speaker, as she was exercising that right and faithfully doing her job as a Member of the United States Congress, one bereft of heart, human compassion, and respect for innocent human life mindlessly shattered her life and the lives of so many others around her.

Madam Speaker, the last words I had with Gabby Giffords were spoken not 10 feet from this podium when we exchanged simple but genuine and heartfelt words and best wishes for the new year and the new Congress. And, Madam Speaker, I will tell you that when I heard the news of this tragedy and the false report that Gabby had died, I felt such an overwhelming sense of grief in my soul to think that those were the last words that I would ever speak to her.

And it was a reminder to me, Madam Speaker, of the brevity and preciousness of human life and freedom and just how important it really is for each of us to seize every moment and to speak kind and loving words to each other while we still can.

So, Madam Speaker, it is my prayer that God would comfort the Giffords family and all of the victims of this horrible tragedy and hold them closely in His arms as only He can, and that He would some day very soon return a smiling Gabby Giffords to this Chamber and to all of us, as clear eyed and as whole as when she left us.

10:46 AM EST

Ed Pastor, D-AZ 4th

Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. I also join my colleague from Arizona, Jeff Flake, in thanking the leadership in bringing this resolution here this morning. I also want to recognize that Representative Giffords' staff is in the gallery with us this morning. So we want to wish them the best.

Madam Speaker, it is with great sadness I rise today to pay tribute to six innocent and precious Arizonans who, while participating in a public event designated to strengthen our democracy, so tragically lost their lives in a [Page: H148]

senseless act of violence last Saturday. I also want to pay tribute to those 14 Arizonans, including our dedicated and beloved colleague, and my personal friend, Gabby Giffords, who were wounded.

These Americans, all dedicated to freedom and all loving their country so much that they chose to use their Saturday morning to participate in a public event to make their government better, are recovering at different paces and with unique and different needs. The city of Tucson, Pima County, and the entire State of Arizona stand poised to assist and welcome these brave heroes back to our communities once they have recovered.

Gabby continues to fight, literally fight, every minute for her life. And we are all reaching toward our God in prayer, contemplation, and silent whispers in our unified effort to bring about her quick recovery and return to us here in this House of Representatives.

Those who perished--Phyllis Schneck, Dorothy Morris, Gabe Zimmerman, Christina Taylor Green, Dorwin Stoddard, and John Roll--will be missed by their families, their colleagues, their friends, and all Arizonans.

[Time: 10:50]

Phyllis Schneck was described by her New Jersey hometown paper as a lifelong conservative, yet she was there to see GABBY because she admired her. This is a perfect example of someone who wanted to step beyond the current vitriol in modern-day politics and bring us together.

Dorothy Morris was married to a former Marine Corps pilot, who was also wounded and recovering. We all know the patriotism and love of country every spouse of a marine exhibits, and she was no exception.

Gabe Zimmerman was one of us. A dedicated staff member to GABBY, it is said that he literally lived to serve his community. Sadly, he perished, but he perished fulfilling his calling and doing what he loved--helping the people of his town.

Christina Taylor Green was just starting her political career. She had just been elected to her school's student council and wanted to come see it done at the highest level. She wanted to see a pro, so she came to see GABBY. She was a special little girl who kept reaching for the stars in politics, dance, baseball, and whatever her heart desired.

Dorwan Stoddard died shielding his wife, who was also wounded but expected to recover. Following their regular Saturday outing, Dorwan brought his wife, Mavy, to GABBY because reportedly she wanted to tell GABBY what a good job she was doing. High school sweethearts who were reconnected after many years apart, they were a pillar of their church community. And we know Mavy will continue on, saddened and burdened, but hopefully not broken.

Finally, Judge Roll had been working with GABBY and several of us in the delegation for the past several months trying to make the courts in Arizona more efficient and more responsive to both the victim and the accused. I knew him to be a fair, dedicated, charming, professional, and loyal person. He loved his family; he loved his profession; he loved his job, his community, and his country. Arizona and the Nation will be a different place without him.

Again, I am encouraged by the reports concerning all the wounded. These individuals are the perfect example of the strength of Arizonans and all Americans. They will recover, we pray, and they will not shy from continuing to serve their community.

This is most true for GABBY. GABBY is a special person among us here in Congress. We all know that. We all love her pragmatism, her bipartisanship, her willingness to learn, her dedication to give, her compassion for her job and for each of us, and her spirit to continue striving to make the Eighth Congressional District of Arizona and America a better place to live and work.

Hopefully, it won't be much longer until we see her here, her smiling face with us again, doing what she loves, and working hard for the people of our country.

Our prayers go to GABBY, all the victims, and the families of the deceased.

I reserve the balance of my time.

10:53 AM EST

David Schweikert, R-AZ 5th

Mr. SCHWEIKERT. Mr. Speaker, it is with a heavy heart that I come to the floor today to offer these thoughts on this tragic event this past Saturday outside Tucson that took the lives of John M. Roll, Christina Taylor Green, Dorwan Stoddard, Dorothy Morris, Gabe Zimmerman, and Phyllis Schneck, and gravely injured our colleague, Congresswoman GABBY GIFFORDS.

It was just last week that my wife and I had the opportunity to visit with GABBY in Statuary Hall before the ceremonial swearing in. And as so many of you know, our interactions with her were gracious, energetic, and she was willing to help us as we were setting up our freshman office. We took a few photos. We talked about ways we could work together, and of course we engaged in the banter and teasing of Arizona's favorite rivalry, ASU versus U of A.

GABBY takes enormous pride in the job in representing the communities of southern Arizona. And my wife and I send our thoughts and prayers to Mark during this difficult time. We deeply appreciate the gift Mark generously shares with all of us here in Washington and back in Arizona.

It is also important not to forget the individuals who lost their lives or who were injured while they were exercising their right to participate and have a say in this Republic. Indeed, they became victims while exercising a fundamental right that has served as a backbone of this country since its founding, a right our Nation's Founders sacrificed so dearly for, just as the victims this last Saturday have tragically also sacrificed for.

We are stunned by the tragedy, but we remain resolute in our commitment to assemble peacefully, engage civilly in the types of discourse that are fundamental to maintaining this Republic. Although words may not sufficiently capture the sorrow and grief we are experiencing, particularly in Arizona, Joyce and I send our thoughts, our prayers to GABBY; Mark; Roxanna and John Green, the parents of little Christina Taylor Green; and the loved ones of Judge Roll, Dorwan Stoddard, Dorothy Morris,

Gabe Zimmerman, Phyllis Schneck, the community of Tucson and southern Arizona, all Arizona, this Nation. Our hearts are heavy, but our prayers are with all of you.

10:56 AM EST

Dennis Kucinich, D-OH 10th

Mr. KUCINICH. We are one as we pay tribute to Congresswoman Giffords and all the other victims of violence in Tucson. Our gathering reflects the truth of America's first motto, which is above this Chamber, E Pluribus Unum--Out of Many, We Are One.

It is vital that we acknowledge our oneness, not just as a Congress, but as a Nation and as a world. In that appreciation for oneness, we find human sympathy, compassion, and love. It is an awareness of the imperative of human unity which can bring us to the threshold of understanding our power to bring an end to the violence which is consuming our loved ones. It is an awareness of the imperative of human unity which can help us to create a new America where the omnipresence of violence is understood

as a challenge to be met, not as an unyielding truth of the human condition to be accepted.

Our hearts are open now as we recognize the victims. So let us be open to a new direction, where we in this Nation can take an organized approach to deal with the causes of violence, not just the effects. We are one with our sister, Congresswoman Giffords, and all the other victims. Let us continue to be one with each other as we struggle to bring light to this moment of darkness.

10:58 AM EST

Ben Quayle, R-AZ 3rd

Mr. QUAYLE. I thank the gentleman from Arizona for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of House Resolution 32 and to honor the victims of the senseless act of violence that took place in Tucson on Saturday. All Arizonans and all Americans mourn the six souls that lost their lives. They will never be forgotten. [Page: H149]

They were model citizens, actively engaged in their community and with their government, just chatting with their Representative on a Saturday morning.

Mr. Speaker, peaceful discourse and participation is a precious part of our society and one of the things that makes our country great. We must not allow an act of violence to inhibit the free exchange of thoughts and concerns.

The six that lost their lives died because they loved America. They wanted to be involved in the process. In recent days, we have heard their inspiring stories from family and friends. We shouldn't have to wonder what the future had in store for them. They are the friends, neighbors, and colleagues that our communities depend upon.

Mr. Speaker, we pray for our friend and colleague, Congresswoman GABBY GIFFORDS. That she survived her wounds is a miracle but no surprise to those who know her and admire her spirit, determination, and conviction.

Congresswoman Giffords was attacked while doing her job to the best of her ability. She wasn't in an ornate congressional hearing room or on the floor of the House. She was back home on the sidewalk of a supermarket listening to the concerns of her constituents. That too, Mr. Speaker, is what makes this country great. That, too, must never change.

In our great State of Arizona, there is much to mourn after Saturday's tragedy. But make no mistake, there are also many things that elicit great pride.

We are proud of the brave civilian and professional first responders whose quick response time and decisive actions prevented more loss of life and greater injury. We are proud of the amazing work performed by the surgeons and the medical teams at the University of Arizona Medical Center, whose skill and expertise shined during trying times.

And above all, Mr. Speaker, we are proud of the six who perished and of Congresswoman Giffords, all of whom were simply doing their duty as good Americans: they as active citizens and she as their worthy Representative.

11:01 AM EST

Sander Levin, D-MI 12th

Mr. LEVIN. We all come together in the aftermath of the overwhelming tragedy at Tucson to remember all of the victims and also to fervently hope, still in disbelief.

Our colleague, Gabrielle Giffords, epitomizes what a public servant should be, fully dedicated, principled, caring and reaching out to all constituents and to all our colleagues. Time will tell with clarity exactly what are the appropriate lessons for all of us to learn from the Tucson tragedy.

In the meanwhile, our focus is, indeed, very personal. In the holiday card that Gabby sent to me, she wrote her best wishes for a joyful new year and continued writing that we will have our work cut out for us.

The new year is now far, far less joyful. So our hope in the prayer we are sending with love to Gabby and to Mark is that Gabby will be able to join us as we take on the work cut out for us to which, Gabby, you have devoted your whole self so fully.

11:03 AM EST

Jeff Flake, R-AZ 6th

Mr. FLAKE. Mr. Speaker, let me just say how nice it is to have you presiding and another Arizonan controlling time on that side and so many in the delegation here today. We are a close delegation.

I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Gosar).

11:03 AM EST

Paul Gosar, R-AZ 1st

Mr. GOSAR. Mr. Speaker, I stand here today with a heavy heart as I give my prayers to Representative Giffords and her family, as well as my condolences to the other victims of the rampage in Tucson. I speak not just for myself and for my family, but for the citizens of my district in Arizona and so many others who are saddened and outraged by this senseless act.

Gabby is more than Arizona's third female Congresswoman. She is first and foremost an American who devoted much of her life to public service. There are risks with public service. We cannot deny that. But Gabby has powerful beliefs, and she came to DC to represent the people of her district, and everyone knows she is tireless.

Gabby has the grit of a fighter and the tenacity of a woman on a mission. It is that heart and that grit and that tenacity that I pray will continue to serve her well and speed her recovery.

I hope the day is coming soon that I get to greet Gabby with open arms and welcome her back to the floor of this House. There is so much that we have yet to do together for Arizona, for this country. I look forward to working with Gabby on the issues of our day and hearing her spirited voice.

Let me add further the acts of a criminal will not stop us from meeting our people. We will not be deterred. We will not be intimidated, and we will not abandon the people of Arizona because of the murderous acts of a deranged killer.

Gabby read the First Amendment on the floor of the House just days before she was shot. That amendment provides that the people shall have the right to petition their government and gives the people of this Nation a voice to speak on the issues important to them. Gabby did not just read the First Amendment; she lived it. She was living it on the very day someone tried to kill her.

Let us continue to pray for the recovery of the wounded. Let us pray for the full recovery of Gabby. Let us pray for the families who lost a loved one. Let us pray for the mothers and fathers who lost a child, and let us pray that God will continue to guide us in everything we do.

11:06 AM EST

Dale E. Kildee, D-MI 5th

Mr. KILDEE. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor and offer prayers for my friend and colleague, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, her staff and all the victims of the tragic and senseless shooting in Tucson.

She is a brilliant and caring public servant. She loves this country as all Members of Congress do.

At times like these, words are always inadequate to express the full extent of our grief. What we can do is pray, reflect, and seek to gain some meaningful perspective from this time of great sorrow.

Mr. Speaker, this terrible act, whatever the cause, does violence to the democratic principles our country was founded on.

As I pray for the victims of this terrible event, I also pray that our country can move forward from this tragedy with that love and respect that Gabrielle Giffords has for human dignity.

11:07 AM EST

Tom Price, R-GA 6th

Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, tragedy is always accompanied by so many thoughts and emotions. The irrational violence visited upon our Nation last Saturday in Tucson brought a new wave, shock at learning the news of the carnage; incredulity at even the possibility of such a senseless act; sadness for those injured or killed and for their families; confusion by this inexplicable violence; anger at the lunatic responsible for this; inadequacy to comprehend the mind that conceives such an act;

respect for those expert hands and minds working to heal the casualties; honor for those who sacrificed and helped in a moment of real crisis; hope for a full recovery for Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and all battling their injuries; recognition that life and liberty are precious and fleeting; love of our

country and the blessing of liberty that we all enjoy; steadfast in our commitment to preserving our great Nation; humbled by our mutual responsibility as citizens charged with that preservation; reverence for our Lord, the only one who knows the answer to the why, and strength from His grace and His love and His mercy.

So we resolve to use this unspeakable and senseless tragedy as an opportunity to better ourselves as a people, to recommit ourselves to the tireless preservation of our Republic and to reaffirm those fundamental principles of liberty and American representative government.

May God place his healing hand on all affected by this heinous event, and may God bless the United States of America.

[Time: 11:10]

11:10 AM EST

Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-TX 30th

Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of the resolution before us today and think it is fitting and proper that we take this opportunity to pause and remember those who lost their lives and were wounded in the tragedy that occurred last Saturday in Tucson, Arizona.

It is really hard to comprehend how such senseless acts of violence can happen. And yet while we may not be able to fathom why this tragedy occurred, the harsh reality is that six innocent people were killed, including a 9-year-old child, and another 14 individuals were wounded, including our own friend and colleague, Representative Gabrielle Giffords. As we speak, she remains in critical condition in the intensive care unit at the University Medical Center in Tucson, fighting for her

life.

Those of us who know Gabby know that she is a real fighter and that gives us optimism that the final outcome will be a good one and that she will be returning to this institution that she loves and still fight for what she believes in.

A number of my colleagues have spoken about the many ways in which Representative Giffords has touched their lives here in Congress, and I would like to echo some of those sentiments. As the ranking member on the Science, Space, and Technology Committee, I have seen firsthand the way her passion, commitment and competence have been used to voice her help for our Nation to move forward in a positive way. She has been very active as a member of the committee sponsoring and cosponsoring

numerous pieces of legislation relating to research, innovation, renewable energy, space exploration, and math and science education. They have included the Solar Technology Roadmap Act, the Science Parks Research and Innovative Technologies Act, the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, and America COMPETES, as many other important pieces. She has been tireless in carrying out her oversight responsibilities.

As chairman of the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee in the 111th Congress, she conducted numerous hearings on a wide range of issues related to NASA, civil and commercial space activities, international cooperation in space, civil aviation, and earth observations, among others. Her willingness to work hard, to get the facts and exercise tough love on the agencies she oversees has earned her the respect of Members on both sides of the aisle. In addition, while she is not afraid to express her

views directly, she always has done so with civility and grace.

Mr. Speaker, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, the one I know and respect, we hope to see her return soon. It is still hard for me to comprehend that such evil could befall her and the other victims of last Saturday. I know I speak for all Members in saying that our thoughts and prayers are with each of them and their families. We look forward to the day when we can welcome Ms. Giffords back to the House floor and join together with her to do the Nation's business.

11:13 AM EST

Pete Sessions, R-TX 32nd

Mr. SESSIONS. Mr. Speaker, I join with my colleagues today with respect to the delegation from Arizona who suffers and yet today comes to the floor of the House of Representatives to do their duty. To the colleagues of Ms. Giffords who today join in support, not only in prayerful support but as we stand together we speak clearly to say that the support for Congresswoman Giffords and all the victims of this tragic shooting and their families need to be remembered, and we offer

full support.

I was deeply shocked and saddened by these heartbreaking events and I join my colleagues and I know all of America looked on TV on Saturday as we all condemned not only in our own hearts but also as our families spoke around the tables about what had happened. We condemn this senseless act of violence.

Congresswoman Giffords is a dedicated public servant and has served the people of Arizona for over 10 years. She was elected to the House of Representatives in 2006. She is known as a steadfast leader in Congress for her constituents. I would see her often on the airplane as we would travel back every weekend. She is known by each of us as a kind and wonderful person who serves with honor and who is a very deeply genuine and a warm person with friends on both sides of the aisle.

All Members of this body understand the high honor it is to serve our constituents every single day and I would like to join my colleagues in standing together today to guarantee that the inhumane acts of this last Saturday will not deter us from our duty. This heartbreaking event has left Americans astonished and speechless. Those participating as Members of Congress today should stand up and say that we will stand behind Gabrielle and look forward to her safe return to be with her

colleagues. We offer a prayer for her support.

11:16 AM EST

Jan Schakowsky, D-IL 9th

Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. I am very grateful to join my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to mourn the tragic loss of six lives and the many who were injured who wanted nothing more than to participate in a simple but precious opportunity to meet directly with their Congresswoman, Gabrielle Giffords.

There will be time to reflect on potential remedies that could prevent or diminish the threat that has so personally touched us all, but today I simply want to send my love to Gabby and to Mark and the rest of their family. We have all had the opportunity to focus on you, Gabby, the brilliant, effective, warm, courageous person and leader that you are. You brought us together to focus on just how meaningful your friendship is to us, to me.

I also want to take this opportunity to thank my dedicated staff here in Washington and at home in the district and all the staff that work with us. Thank you for your daily efforts and sacrifices, the long hours and the commitment to your constituents, our constituents. The tragedy of this event and the loss of Gabe Zimmerman and the wounded staff has brought home just how important you are to all of us and to everything that we do here.

Let us take this sad moment to seek peace and love, to honor those who were killed, and fervently pray for those who were injured, including our beloved colleague Gabrielle Giffords and look forward to the day when she will return to us in full health.

11:18 AM EST

John Carter, R-TX 31st

Mr. CARTER. Mr. Speaker, I come over here today because about 3 weeks ago, 4 weeks ago, on a plane coming back from Washington, DC. flying to Dallas, where I changed planes and also Gabrielle Giffords changed planes, was my first opportunity to interact with this young lady. I watched her visit with the fellow travelers on the plane. She espied a couple of her constituents and talked with them. She visited with me. And then as we shared a cart to our changing gates, I was just touched

by what a really, really nice person she was.

We interact in this building and we have our debates and so forth, but I got a chance to just ride and talk about family and talk about life with a charming, intelligent and quite honestly captivating young lady. And that's why I came down here today, because you don't cross paths with individuals like that very often. And when you do, it's a blessing that comes into your life.

And then when I turned on the television and discovered that this blessing had been attacked by this vicious, vicious attack that took place in Arizona, and not only was this sweet life placed at risk but a 9-year-old child was killed senselessly, others were murdered, others were wounded on the streets of Tucson in the United States of America at a congressional event.

[Time: 11:20]

It makes you stop and pause and think. We have to get back together and work on these issues. We have to get civility into the world.

And I am concerned about the violence. Violence has entered our House and injured one of our own and killed one of our own. I hope justice is swift and I hope justice is severe. But as we go forward, we need to work together to secure not only this House, but to secure this Nation. [Page: H151]

11:20 AM EST

Donna F. Edwards, D-MD 4th

Ms. EDWARDS of Maryland. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in honor and prayer for our friend and colleague, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, a delightful personality, a dedicated legislator, and a powerful advocate for her constituents. Sitting next to her on the Science and Technology Committee, you only had to be there to know and feel her passion for NASA, solar technology innovation and research. It has rubbed off.

As we pause to reflect on the terrible tragedy that took place in Tucson, we know that Congresswoman Giffords was simply doing what she does so well, meeting with the constituents of Arizona's Eighth Congressional District and hearing their different points of view. This is a sentiment that is reflected in Congresswoman Giffords' own words when she said, ``My position ..... is to listen to my constituents ..... then ultimately make sound, rational decisions that are going to

be beneficial for the Eighth Congressional District. That's my job.''

Mr. Speaker, I join the Nation in expressing my sorrow for the senseless and tragic loss of life--Christina Taylor Green, Dorothy Morris, U.S. District Court Judge John Roll, Phyllis Schneck, Dorwin Stoddard, and Gabriel Zimmerman--and to all those injured, including our friend and colleague, Gabrielle Giffords and her staff. We will keep you and your families in our hearts, thoughts, and prayers.

We are deeply grateful for the heroes, sung and unsung, who showed great courage and sacrifice and continue to do so in caring for their friends, family, and community.

To Gabby; to Mark Kelly, her husband; her staff, we pray that your burdens are lifted and that the dark days become light. May God bless you and strengthen you. May God bless this Congress, and may God bless America.

11:22 AM EST

Greg Walden, R-OR 2nd

Mr. WALDEN. Mr. Speaker, I rise on behalf of the people of Oregon's Second District to offer my deepest sympathies to the families of the victims of Saturday's senseless shooting in Tucson. Americans see each of us taking this personally, because Congresswoman Giffords and her staff were doing what each of us does in our own way: We go home; we reach out to listen to people who agree and disagree, and we practice the art of democracy. It is a practice so fundamental to our Nation that

families bring their young children who are interested in public service; senior judges attend to discuss Federal policy, and citizens come to get help with their Medicare or Veterans Affairs benefits. No one comes thinking such a despicable act of violence will occur.

Despite deep philosophical differences, sometimes argued vigorously and vociferously in our meetings, Americans share a common belief that violence has no place in democratic discourse.

In Romans 12:1, Paul writes, ``Don't be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.'' We stand together across America committed to this calling and in the belief that the great good in America will always overcome the isolated evil.

May God's healing hand be on our colleague and those affected and bring comfort to all.

11:24 AM EST

Jane Harman, D-CA 36th

Ms. HARMAN. Mr. Speaker, as Gabby's colleagues, we all have had moments with her, so many memories that we recall vividly and fondly. For me, she is a refreshing, frank, and inspiring younger member of the House sisterhood. She is whip smart and a serious and disciplined legislator. She is the kind of person we need so badly in this Chamber doing the people's business without rancor or vitriol.

Though the attack occurred in Tucson, it was an attack on all of us, and it strikes very close to home. Just a week ago today, I sat near Gabby at a New Democrat lunch in the Capitol Visitor Center. The group was assessing the recent election, and her contribution to the discussion was personal, impressive, and well delivered. But 7 days is a long time in politics, and our world here is in upheaval.

Beyond the heroic efforts of Tucson's emergency and medical teams, the FBI, and the Capitol Police, the alleged gunman must be fairly and swiftly prosecuted. But there is more. The Congress family must take additional, prudent steps to protect our staffs and constituents from random violence at our public events or offices. I serve here, as we all do, in loco parentis and take this very seriously.

And finally, we should revisit sensible Federal laws to control access to guns and ammunition. At a minimum, I believe we must promptly restore the expired Federal ban on extended magazine clips. I personally would urge us also to reenact the 1994 ban on assault weapons, which I was proud to support, and to bar sales of Saturday night specials.

Mr. Speaker, we can't roll back last Saturday, but we can and must learn its lessons.

11:26 AM EST

Cynthia Lummis, R-WY

Mrs. LUMMIS. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this resolution. I rise to add the voice of the people of Wyoming to the chorus of united Americans reaching out in prayer to the victims in Arizona and to the families of those whose lives were stolen from them.

On January 6, Representative Gabrielle Giffords took to the floor of this House and eloquently read to us the First Amendment of our Constitution. She gave her own strong emphasis to the phrase that grants Americans the right to peaceably assemble. Two days later, she and her constituents have had their God-given rights violently taken from them.

In the midst of our national grief, the desire to make sense of the senseless is profound. We err if we attempt to rationalize what is wholly irrational and to understand what cannot be understood. The Apostle Paul writes, ``Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror.''

Instead, let us all stand with the gentlelady from Arizona in her time of trial and in defense of the Constitution which she is striving to uphold. Let us stand with our 9-year-old daughters who are fostering a budding interest in our representative democracy. Let us stand with our 76- and 79-year-old mothers and fathers who seek only to forge a relationship with their elected representatives and to impart a wisdom that comes with long life as a citizen of this country. And let us stand with

our servant leaders of all ages and parties and to spend every day in a passionate effort to better a great Nation and a beautiful ideal.

We do them honor if we continue, not with idle speculation, but with a renewed commitment to exercise the rights of liberty and freedom. We begin the long road to healing by fervently praying for peace in our world, peace in our country, and peace in our hearts.

God bless the victims of Saturday's violence and their families. God bless America. And now may the peace of God which surpasses all human understanding and all human misunderstanding be with us all.

[Time: 11:30]

11:30 AM EST

Madeleine Bordallo, D-GU

Ms. BORDALLO. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the resolution today and to honor the six individuals who lost their lives; and my friend and my colleague, Gabby Giffords, who is currently fighting for her life; and the 13 other wounded victims of Saturday's tragic shooting in Tucson. Gabe Zimmerman, Federal Judge John Roll, Dorothy Morris, Phyllis Schneck, Dorwan Stoddard, and the innocent 9-year-old Christina Taylor Green, all who passed away on Saturday in such a senseless act of

violence that was a direct attack on our democracy.

Being the extraordinary public servant she is, Gabby had taken her first opportunity in the 112th Congress to organize an event to learn of her constituents' concerns and their hopes. The victims had all peacefully gathered at a local mall to participate in the democratic process. The basic exercise of democracy was interrupted by a disturbed individual bent on anger at the system. This needless and despicable act of violence has no place in [Page: H152]

our

society and should give us all cause to reflect on the level of political discourse in this country.

But while we recognize the tragedy that occurred and pray for the quick recovery of those injured and those who died, let us not overlook the many acts of bravery and heroism on Saturday.

As we piece together the events of last Saturday, my thoughts and prayers go out to Gabby and the others who have been killed or injured. Let this tragic event serve as a reminder of the obligation that we have as elected Representatives of the people to be responsible in our leadership and be careful of the words that we choose.

I will keep the victims and their families in my thoughts and prayers, and I know that all of my colleagues will do so as well.

GENERAL LEAVE

11:32 AM EST

Eric Cantor, R-VA 7th

Mr. CANTOR. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on H. Res. 32.

11:33 AM EST

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-FL 18th

Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker, I thank our leader for the time.

Just a few days ago, one of our own, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, was gravely injured as a result of a terrible act of an unbalanced individual. Americans were profoundly shocked and saddened and continue to be by this deplorable act of violence which resulted in the unjust deaths of six innocent individuals and a struggle to survive for others, including our own Gabby.

Among those who lost their lives, we know that the list is lamentably long: the Honorable John Roll, a Federal judge who went by just to say hi to his friend, Gabby; and Christina Taylor Green, a 9-year-old girl, who had just been chosen to serve in her school's student council and was taken to Gabby's ``Congress on Your Corner'' event by a family friend who wanted to get her interested in public affairs; and Gabe Zimmerman, a member of Gabby's loyal staff who had an

enormous heart and was recently engaged to be married.

It is difficult to make sense of this tragedy, but all Americans stand with Gabby and her family and the families of all the victims throughout this painful time. Many of us count Gabby not just as a colleague but as a friend. I had the privilege of getting to know Gabby as a member of our Foreign Affairs Committee. She has always demonstrated a strong commitment to serving her constituents, our men and women of our Armed Forces and our Nation. And that is exactly what

we must do. We must not waiver in our duties to serve those whom we are proudly and yet humbly asked to serve.

Our Republic was founded on the premise that the people have the right and the duty to petition their Representatives and to express their views, and Gabby truly embodies that principle. She has always been accessible. She has always been eager to listen to her constituents. Representatives like Gabby are what has made America an example of freedom and democracy the world over. It is truly reprehensible to think these noble intentions were exploited to carry out such a terrible

tragedy.

To quote Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: ``We must disagree without becoming violently disagreeable.''

The thoughts and prayers of the residents of Florida's 18th Congressional District are with Gabby's family and with the families of all those affected by this senseless tragedy.

11:35 AM EST

Doris O. Matsui, D-CA 5th

Ms. MATSUI. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the victims of the Tucson shooting, including our colleague and friend, GABBY GIFFORDS. I have seen GABBY's commitment and dedication to her constituents firsthand. I have had the pleasure to work with her as we promoted efforts to restore our Nation's competitiveness and specifically to help create clean energy jobs.

GABBY is smart, courageous, disciplined, and effective. And as we have all seen over the last few days, her strength is unwavering.

Last Saturday, GABBY organized an event to talk to her constituents about their priorities, about their concerns and their hopes. It is heartbreaking and a tragedy that six innocent people lost their lives and an additional 13 have been critically wounded, all while trying to participate in and strengthen our democracy.

We are all now reflecting on what brought our country to this point and how to move forward. As everyone in this Chamber can attest, being a Representative is more than a job title. It is what we do, and it is who we are. We meet with our constituents. We listen to them. We advocate for their best interests.

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to take a moment to honor the other victims of this horrific tragedy: 9-year-old beautiful Christina Taylor Green, recently elected to the student council; Gabe Zimmerman, a dedicated staffer who was just on the cusp of his own life, recently engaged; Federal Judge John Roll, a highly respected jurist who just came by to thank GABBY for her support of the judiciary; Phyllis Schneck, who was a tireless volunteer at her local church; Dorwan Stoddard who shielded

his dear wife; and Dorothy Morris who was married to her husband a long time who was also there but who survived.

My thoughts and prayers remain with GABBY and with each victim and their families.

11:36 AM EST

Doris O. Matsui, D-CA 5th

Ms. MATSUI. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the victims of the Tucson shooting, including our colleague and friend, GABBY GIFFORDS. I have seen GABBY's commitment and dedication to her constituents firsthand. I have had the pleasure to work with her as we promoted efforts to restore our Nation's competitiveness and specifically to help create clean energy jobs.

GABBY is smart, courageous, disciplined, and effective. And as we have all seen over the last few days, her strength is unwavering.

Last Saturday, GABBY organized an event to talk to her constituents about their priorities, about their concerns and their hopes. It is heartbreaking and a tragedy that six innocent people lost their lives and an additional 13 have been critically wounded, all while trying to participate in and strengthen our democracy.

We are all now reflecting on what brought our country to this point and how to move forward. As everyone in this Chamber can attest, being a Representative is more than a job title. It is what we do, and it is who we are. We meet with our constituents. We listen to them. We advocate for their best interests.

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to take a moment to honor the other victims of this horrific tragedy: 9-year-old beautiful Christina Taylor Green, recently elected to the student council; Gabe Zimmerman, a dedicated staffer who was just on the cusp of his own life, recently engaged; Federal Judge John Roll, a highly respected jurist who just came by to thank GABBY for her support of the judiciary; Phyllis Schneck, who was a tireless volunteer at her local church; Dorwan Stoddard who shielded

his dear wife; and Dorothy Morris who was married to her husband a long time who was also there but who survived.

My thoughts and prayers remain with GABBY and with each victim and their families.

11:38 AM EST

Brett Guthrie, R-KY 2nd

Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to be here to offer my thoughts and prayers for GABBY, our colleague. Like all of us, any interaction I ever had with her was always pleasant and memorable, and I look forward to her returning. I pray for her return. I am praying for her staff and praying for the other victims.

I just want to hold up one victim this morning. I didn't know Dorwan Stoddard, but through a close network of friends, I had the opportunity to learn a little bit about Dorwan Stoddard. He shielded his wife with his own body, saving her life but losing his own. He and his wife were having breakfast and decided they wanted to go to the ``Congress on the Corner'' to give GABBY encouragement for the new year and the new Congress to encourage her.

He loved the Bible. He loved the scriptures in its simplest and purest form and just wanted to internalize them and live them, which is evidenced in his life. He was very involved in church work. He ran the Benevolence Program, which lived up to Christ's challenge to feed the hungry and clothe the poor. We know that he internalized the scripture because of his last act. And I don't know this, but I think I can say without fear of contradiction there were many times he was probably sitting in

church, the minister was delivering a sermon on marriage, and I am sure the text was Ephesians 5:25 when it said: Husbands, love your wife, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her. What love he had for his wife, and what faith he had in God.

[Time: 11:40]

Throughout his life, he aspired to do good. Through his life, let us all aspire to do our best.

11:38 AM EST

Brett Guthrie, R-KY 2nd

Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to be here to offer my thoughts and prayers for GABBY, our colleague. Like all of us, any interaction I ever had with her was always pleasant and memorable, and I look forward to her returning. I pray for her return. I am praying for her staff and praying for the other victims.

I just want to hold up one victim this morning. I didn't know Dorwan Stoddard, but through a close network of friends, I had the opportunity to learn a little bit about Dorwan Stoddard. He shielded his wife with his own body, saving her life but losing his own. He and his wife were having breakfast and decided they wanted to go to the ``Congress on the Corner'' to give GABBY encouragement for the new year and the new Congress to encourage her.

He loved the Bible. He loved the scriptures in its simplest and purest form and just wanted to internalize them and live them, which is evidenced in his life. He was very involved in church work. He ran the Benevolence Program, which lived up to Christ's challenge to feed the hungry and clothe the poor. We know that he internalized the scripture because of his last act. And I don't know this, but I think I can say without fear of contradiction there were many times he was probably sitting in

church, the minister was delivering a sermon on marriage, and I am sure the text was Ephesians 5:25 when it said: Husbands, love your wife, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her. What love he had for his wife, and what faith he had in God.

[Time: 11:40]

Throughout his life, he aspired to do good. Through his life, let us all aspire to do our best.

11:40 AM EST

Al Green, D-TX 9th

Mr. AL GREEN of Texas. Madam Speaker, today we are one, and we are resolute.

We are one because we understand that there really is but one race, and that is the human race. We are one because, as Dr. King put it, all of humanity was created by one common Creator to live in harmony--from a bass black to a treble white.

We are one, and we are resolute.

We are resolute in our belief that one day our friend, our sister, will return to the floor of this Congress, to this Hall, and she will stand at this podium, and she will be welcomed by her colleagues as she returns and takes her rightful place in the Halls of the Congress of the United States of America.

We are one, and we are resolute because we believe that an innocent baby was taken from us. That innocent baby, though she is not with us in the [Page: H153]

physical, will forever be with us in the spiritual as long as we remember who she was and never forget that we cannot allow the innocent to be stolen from us without our taking the time to pause and be grateful for the time that we had with the innocent.

We are one, and we are resolute.

We must also be resolute in a basic premise that Dr. King called to our attention, and that is that we must learn to live together as brothers and sisters, or we will perish together as fools.

We are one, and we are resolute.

11:41 AM EST

Erik Paulsen, R-MN 3rd

Mr. PAULSEN. Madam Speaker, I rise today in tribute to my friend and colleague, Representative Gabrielle Giffords, one of many victims of a very senseless act of violence this past Saturday.

I have had the pleasure of knowing GABBY and her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, for several years--even before either of us stepped foot in this Chamber. In my district office, there is a photo of GABBY, myself, and others who were part of an Aspen Institute-Rodel fellowship program, which was created to explore the responsibilities of public leadership; advance thoughtful, civil, bipartisan dialogue; and help America's young leaders achieve their full potential. GABBY is

so much about all of these ideals.

Quite often, I found myself looking at this photo over the last few days; and I couldn't help but think that all of our communities could use a few more individuals like GABBY, whose bright smile and kind heart have come to define her tenure here in Congress.

For many of us here today, the news of the tragedy was gut-wrenching. It's hard to believe that, just a few days before this senseless attack, my family and I were out visiting at the Air and Space Museum at Dulles Airport when we heard someone shout out my name. I turned around, and it was GABBY's husband, Mark, with GABBY and her parents in tow. We spent the next several minutes sharing a positive outlook about the new Congress that was upcoming and, as friends often do, recalling

some of our good memories, such as when I joined GABBY with two of my daughters at one of Mark's space shuttle launches in Florida.

Over the past few days, there have been many moving tributes to GABBY, and all of them are true. She leads by example with her fighting spirit, her diligent work ethic and friendly, constant smile. It is my hope that we can follow in GABBY's footsteps over the next several weeks and, as hard as it may be, can show the same bright smile and kind heart that she has shown all of us.

My thoughts and prayers remain with GABBY, her husband, Mark; and their family; and with GABBY's staff--all of the victims and their families who are a part of this tragedy.

11:44 AM EST

Steve Cohen, D-TN 9th

Mr. COHEN. Madam Speaker, I, as some of the future speakers here, are members of the class of 2006, which Representative Giffords was a member of. We had the opportunity to go through the orientation with her, to meet with Speaker Pelosi on many occasions, and to share many activities.

Gabrielle Giffords is a tremendous Member of this House--bright, caring, beautiful--and we all pray for her recovery and that she comes back and works with us.

I listened to her remarks on television when she talked about words having consequences and her brother-in-law, who is up in space, saying the same thing. It's true. Words have consequences, and we all need to be more concerned about how we speak about political opponents or people who have different perspectives than we do on political issues.

We are all Americans. We are all human beings. We all have similar goals and similar aspirations; and even though we may differ on philosophy, that doesn't make us communists or socialists or Birchers or whatever. We are all trying to make this government work.

One thing that we know about the person who did this shooting, besides the fact that he needed mental health treatment and was obviously crazy, is that he didn't like government. Government is good, and one thing we should learn from this is that government can be and is a good force. It is a lot about what America is. People who tear down government are doing a disservice to all of us, and they provide an atmosphere in which people think that anarchy is an answer. It is never an answer. Orwellianism

is a philosophy that ought to be followed, and it isn't.

Gabby works as a Congressperson to make government work for her people, and that's what she was doing with her program on Saturday. The staffers who were there were working on the weekend, as many staffers do, and they work long hours. They love government and they love people, and they try to make a difference.

So I think we just need to remember that we are all human beings, that we all have similar goals and aspirations, that government can and is good, and it is the representative body of the United States of America. If you don't like the government, you don't like the country, and I love the country and so did Gabby.

11:46 AM EST

Michael McCaul, R-TX 10th

Mr. McCAUL. I thank the gentleman.

Madam Speaker, we gather here today in this House and as a Nation to mourn the tragic events in Tucson, Arizona; to honor those who lost their lives and those still fighting for them; to honor the heroic acts on that dark day; and to condemn the perpetrator for this senseless act of violence.

The last few days have been surreal. When I first heard the news, I was shocked and disturbed that one of our own had been shot--someone I am privileged to call a friend and a colleague. As the Speaker said, when one of us is attacked, all of us are attacked. This experience has been painful to all of us and hits too close to home.

Professionally, I was fortunate to have worked with Gabrielle Giffords, or Gabby, as she is affectionately called. We both serve on the Science and Technology and Foreign Affairs Committees. She is passionate, bright, and a delight to be around. Gabby is a talented lawmaker who always works effectively across the aisle to get things done for the American people. I am honored to have been one of those she chose to work with.

She always told me Arizona and Texas are sunshine States and we need to harness that energy. I agreed with her, and together we introduced and passed the Solar Technology Roadmap Act. She often talked about being from border States and that we needed security to protect our way of life. We passed a $600 million appropriation for more resources on the border.

As everybody knows, she is a staunch advocate for NASA, and she is married to an astronaut. She passionately defended the space program; and we worked together, with many others, to save the Human Spaceflight Program. In fact, the last time I saw Gabby, a week ago, we were getting off the elevator over there to vote on the floor here, and we talked about NASA.

She said in her classic way, Yeah, but we can always do better. That was her spirit--we can always do better.

We often talked about putting together a delegation of Members to witness the last shuttle flight, the one that her husband, Mark, is commanding. I hope we will still have that opportunity.

So when I received the news that she had been shot, it had a profound and personal impact upon me--for, above all, she is my friend. She is a bright ray of sunshine in what is too often a dark world.

Coming out of a tough election, she often talked about moderation and of toning down the partisan rhetoric to get things done for the American people. I know that it is her sincere hope that, as her wounds heal, so, too, will the wound inflicted upon this Nation and that the political discourse in this country will be restored to one of civility.

[Time: 11:50]

I pray for her and all those affected by this horrible tragedy. I pray that one day she will return to this floor and join her colleagues, and I am confident that she will. For above all, she is a passionate fighter and an eternal optimist.

So keep fighting, Gabby, for we need you and more people like you in this world. May God bless you, and may He hold you in the palm of His hand.

11:50 AM EST

Joe Crowley, D-NY 7th

Mr. CROWLEY. I thank my friend from Arizona for yielding me this time.

First, Madam Speaker, I want to recognize and give thanks to the leadership of the House--in particular Nancy Pelosi, and more so this morning to Speaker John Boehner--for this beautiful resolution that we have before us today. I said on Sunday that his remarks were appropriately brief when he said, ``An attack upon one of us is an attack upon all of us.'' It could not have been better said in reflection upon what took place in our country on Saturday. Judge John Roll, Gabe

Zimmerman, Christina Green, Dorothy Morris, Phyllis Schneck, and Dorwan Stoddard all were taken from us too soon by a crazed and depraved individual.

I wanted to take a moment to also mention the wonderful staff of Gabby Giffords. I had the opportunity on Saturday afternoon, being in Washington, to stop by her office and immediately was moved by the palpable sense of love and affection that was throughout their room, not only for Gabby, but for all the victims and particularly their fellow colleagues.

I also want to take this opportunity to thank all of our staffs--whom maybe many of us in Congress take for granted--for their tireless work and their efforts to serve the people of our constituency and of our great country, not always reflecting upon sometimes the danger that we can't avoid.

Gabby Giffords and I go back even prior to her getting elected. I had the great opportunity to endorse her early in her primary because I was so moved by the moxie and the strength of Gabby Giffords when I visited Arizona. She often would say to me when she was around Mark, you know: Mark always tells me, Joe Crowley, that I'm his second favorite Member of Congress and you're the first. She said that, I think, because she knows how I was unabashed about my admiration

for her.

11:52 AM EST

Joe Crowley, D-NY 7th

Mr. CROWLEY. The last conversation I had prior to this incident was last Friday when she asked me: Joe, can I chair the new Dem Task Force on Energy? She was trying to convince me somehow that I had to let her do this. And I just said: Gabby, you're not a freshman Member of the House. Yeah, you're going to do that. Don't worry about that.

But she was always trying to convince. She's a star. We know it. Every Member here knows it, Democrat and Republican. This woman has something that many of us wish we had, and that is an inner beauty. And if we can take something away from this event, this tragic event, aside from the issues of rhetoric and aside from the issues of gun control--and mental illness, which we do not give enough time to in this country--it is the beauty of this woman and what she reflects upon this institution.

11:54 AM EST

Louie Gohmert Jr., R-TX 1st

Mr. GOHMERT. Madam Speaker, Gabrielle Giffords is always a bright spot in this rather dull, moody, self-absorbed body called Congress. She is easy to work with no matter on which side of the aisle we happen to be. We all find ourselves being criticized, but few of us have been able to respond with the grace and class with which Gabby has.

Today, we mourn the loss of all those killed during the evil shooting spree in Tucson. I know we are praying for the victims' families, that somehow, through their devastating loss and heartbreak, they may still find that peace that passes all understanding. For those who have survived the assault, may they find healing in the shadow of the Almighty.

Hearing so much these days about the need for congenial discourse, we might look at Gabby Giffords as a living example of how we go about discerning the roadmap to get to the desired decorum. I'm sure both sides of the aisle wish the other side worked with others as well as Gabby does. She makes people here in Congress smile just by showing up.

Her flights to and from Washington, D.C., often had us on the same flight to and from the Dallas/Fort Worth airport hub. Gabby knows I love chocolate, so when she sees me on her flight, she always lights up and says something like: Louie, I was hoping you would be on my flight. I need some chocolate.

Gabby always finds something for which she can look forward. Our prayers remain with her.

This is no time for assigning blame to anyone but the gunman. This is a time to note the positive influences from those who were harmed. This is a time to note and perpetuate the good in their lives so that they live on whether their heart beats or not. This is a time to learn from Gabby, who has a heart that both still beats and still inspires. We can learn from her attributes and her ability to smile even at those of us with whom we disagree as we pray for the opportunity for her smile

to regain its vitality so she can go back to spreading her sunshine to all the places that need it.

May God bless Gabby Giffords and all of those who are suffering because of this heinous attack as only He knows their most specific needs. May God further provide the comfort and peace that only comes from the embrace of His loving arms.

Let me just close by saying that when I see her again, I'm going to have plenty of chocolate just for her.

11:57 AM EST

James Clyburn, D-SC 6th

Mr. CLYBURN. I thank the gentleman for yielding me the time.

Madam Speaker, the Book of Micah, the religion that Gabby practices, raises a question: What would the Lord require of thee?

And the question is answered in Micah 6:8: To do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly.

I cannot think of anybody whom I have ever served with who personified that passage more than Gabby Giffords.

In my faith, I practice that which is found in the Book of Luke, the 10th chapter, where we get the story of the Good Samaritan. The question was asked of the lawyer who wanted to know what was required to have life everlasting. In the answer, the master said to him: In this and other things, love thy neighbor as thyself.

Gabby Giffords is our neighbor, not just here in this body, but she is our neighbor on this great planet, because we learn from that story that being one's neighbor is not dependent upon one's religion, nor is it dependent upon one's ethnicity.

[Time: 12:00]

Being one's neighbor is dependent upon whether or not we have the capacity to show compassion. Gabby Giffords is our neighbor, and I'm pleased to honor her today.

11:59 AM EST

Leonard Lance, R-NJ 7th

Mr. LANCE. Madam Speaker, I rise today in support of this resolution.

We come together to extend our thoughts and prayers to those who were killed and to those who were wounded during the horrific attack in Tucson on Saturday.

As we gather in the people's House, we pray for the recovery of our colleague, Representative Giffords, and the others who were wounded, including those who serve the public in the Congresswoman's office. We mourn the loss of Judge Roll; Gabriel Zimmerman; the 9-year-old girl, Christina Taylor Green; and the others who were senselessly killed that terrible morning.

While the horrific events in Tucson provide a stark reminder of the fragility of human life, we are also reminded that we meet on the floor of the House of Representatives in what Franklin Roosevelt, and more recently George W. Bush, have called ``the warm courage of national unity.'' We have heard the inspiring stories of those whose selflessness protected the lives of others.

Violence has no place in the life of the American Nation. This tragedy will strengthen, not weaken, our resolve to serve the true principles of democracy.

May God bless those who are fighting for their lives as a result of this attack, and may the souls of those who were lost be received in His loving embrace.

12:01 PM EST

Adam B. Schiff, D-CA 29th

Mr. SCHIFF. Madam Speaker, last Wednesday, this Nation and the world witnessed the orderly transfer of power in this House when Nancy Pelosi passed the Speaker's gavel on to Speaker John Boehner. That simple act occurred without violence. It occurred without soldiers in the streets or a massive show of force by the police. For most Americans, indeed for most people working in this building, the day was rather ordinary.

Our lack of political violence, our tradition of resolving policy arguments in the legislature and the courtroom is one of the greatest gifts that the Founders and all of the generations that followed them have left to us. But, as we were so cruelly reminded last Saturday, our peaceful civil discourse can never be taken for granted. It is a gift that must be safeguarded.

Last Saturday, our colleague, Gabby Giffords, set up shop outside a local Safeway in Tucson to engage her constituents to perform the central role of representative democracy--listening to the people. The hatred exhibited by the would-be assassin, before and during the shooting, were an assault on that connection between those of us who have the honor to serve and those we represent.

My heart goes out to Gabby, her family and staff, and to the families and friends of Federal Judge John Roll, Congress staffer Gabe Zimmerman, Phyllis Schneck, Dorwan Stoddard, Dorothy Morris, and Christina Taylor Green, who was born on September 11, 2001, and who deserved a longer life than this.

And to Gabby and her staff here in the gallery today, there is one day that we look forward to above all others, and that is the day that Gabby walks back onto this House floor and stands before this podium and is recognized.

We know that day will come, and we pray that it comes soon.

12:02 PM EST

Adam B. Schiff, D-CA 29th

Mr. SCHIFF. Madam Speaker, last Wednesday, this Nation and the world witnessed the orderly transfer of power in this House when Nancy Pelosi passed the Speaker's gavel on to Speaker John Boehner. That simple act occurred without violence. It occurred without soldiers in the streets or a massive show of force by the police. For most Americans, indeed for most people working in this building, the day was rather ordinary.

Our lack of political violence, our tradition of resolving policy arguments in the legislature and the courtroom is one of the greatest gifts that the Founders and all of the generations that followed them have left to us. But, as we were so cruelly reminded last Saturday, our peaceful civil discourse can never be taken for granted. It is a gift that must be safeguarded.

Last Saturday, our colleague, Gabby Giffords, set up shop outside a local Safeway in Tucson to engage her constituents to perform the central role of representative democracy--listening to the people. The hatred exhibited by the would-be assassin, before and during the shooting, were an assault on that connection between those of us who have the honor to serve and those we represent.

My heart goes out to Gabby, her family and staff, and to the families and friends of Federal Judge John Roll, Congress staffer Gabe Zimmerman, Phyllis Schneck, Dorwan Stoddard, Dorothy Morris, and Christina Taylor Green, who was born on September 11, 2001, and who deserved a longer life than this.

And to Gabby and her staff here in the gallery today, there is one day that we look forward to above all others, and that is the day that Gabby walks back onto this House floor and stands before this podium and is recognized.

We know that day will come, and we pray that it comes soon.

12:03 PM EST

Ted Poe, R-TX 2nd

Mr. POE of Texas. Madam Speaker, it was a Saturday morning, clear skies, and a wonderful day, and Gabby Giffords was doing what really she liked to do best, what many of us like to do best--talking to people that we represent and listening to those people back home.

Friday, before she left for Tucson and I left for southeast Texas, we were talking here on the House floor. Gabby and I are friends. I have been to Iraq with her. And we were talking about border security. In fact, she had invited me to Tucson to see what takes place there and go to the border. I, likewise, have already invited her to Texas to see our border. And we work quite well together. She works with everybody quite well. And then she was off to the airport, going home.

Many people don't realize that most Members of Congress go home every weekend. We don't live in Washington. We work in Washington, and we commute. And she was headed to the airport, excited to go back and see the people that she represents.

And then Saturday morning, an evildoer came to a public gathering, attacked Gabby, He really attacked our Nation, because there was a crowd of citizens, old and young, that were peaceably assembling to learn more about America--to participate in the American process in dealing with their representative, Gabby Giffords.

We should remember the victims that were shot and killed that day. The evildoer, his name is not important. He should be held personally accountable for his actions. His trial should be swift. If convicted, his punishment should be severe. But it is the victims that we honor, that we remember in this cruel episode of evil.

You know, Christina Taylor Green, a 9-year-old girl, just elected to the student council in her third grade class. She liked politics. She wanted to be more involved, and that's why she was there Saturday morning with Gabby Giffords. She was born on 9/11, a 9-year-old girl, her life stolen in her youth.

All of us who are parents, grandparents, we never want to see our child or someone else's child taken before their time. But that's what happened to Christina Taylor Green, apparently a wonderful, wonderful young person.

You know, Gabby Giffords is a fighter, and she fights for her beliefs, make no question about it. Everybody who knows her, knows where she stands on issues. My grandmother described her years ago without even knowing it. My grandmother was probably the most influential person in my life. My friends on that side of the aisle would appreciate the fact that she was a Yellow Dog Democrat and never forgave me for being a Republican. But she made a comment about people like Gabby.

She said, ``there is nothing more powerful than a woman that has made up her mind.'' Gabby Giffords is that woman.

12:07 PM EST

Ted Poe, R-TX 2nd

Mr. POE of Texas. She's made up her mind about her beliefs. She's made up her mind about the will to represent the people in Arizona. And I believe she's made up her mind to survive, because only 5 percent of gunshot wounds to the head, those people, survive. And she will be one of them.

So we recognize her; we honor her, and we look forward to seeing her on this House floor again being that strong-willed woman, that feisty woman from Arizona.

And that's just the way it is.

12:08 PM EST

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. I thank the gentleman for yielding.

Congresswoman Giffords loved America and she loved America's values, and America blessed her with opportunities. American values give us all the opportunity to do our best and to be our best. Last Saturday, Congresswoman Giffords was at her best meeting the people of Arizona, of Tucson, and the United States of America.

But Congresswoman Giffords would also ask us to do our best. And as the Bible has said, she was a woman who used her talents well.

She would also want us to acknowledge the Americans who have poured out their hearts during this tragedy all over this Nation.

[Time: 12:10]

Americans did their best Saturday. And good Americans lost their lives being good Americans. We know of those who lost their lives and offered to us a sacrifice: Christina Taylor Green, Dorothy Morris, Judge John Roll, Phyllis Schneck, Dorwan Stoddard, and Gabriel Zimmerman of her staff.

We are well aware of what happened. And we say to Congresswoman Giffords, keep on fighting for your life, along with others who were wounded, while the heroes of that day, Mr. Hernandez and others, reflect on the horror. But hopefully, they know that they did their best.

Now it is time for us to do our best, to be a servant leader, giving to others first, showing by example. It is so very important that we do so in her name. To Captain Kelly, a brave American and family, we stand by you, we stand by your side. You will not stand by yourself. To Congresswoman Giffords' staff, we stand with you, and we pray for you and your loss and those who are wounded.

We are committed to both our freedom of expression and our job to create a more perfect Union. And yes, in the words of Scott Kelly, as I offer them today, Mark's twin brother, ``We have a unique vantage point here aboard the international space station. As I look out the window, I see a very beautiful planet that seems very inviting and peaceful. Unfortunately, it is not. These days, we are constantly reminded of the unspeakable acts of violence and damage we can inflict upon one another, not

just with our actions but also with our irresponsible words. We are better than this. We must do better.''

I agree, we can do better. And we can follow these words.

12:10 PM EST

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. Nonviolence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it as a sword that heals. Let us use nonviolence in our expression. Let us denounce violence. And as Martin Luther King would tell us, that we can be a people of peace. And I know that we know the words of John Lennon, ``Let [Page: H156]

it be.'' But the truth will let us be free. And I look forward to the gentlelady from Tucson, Arizona,

being here with us. God bless you, and God bless America.

12:11 PM EST

Mike Turner, R-OH 3rd

Mr. TURNER. Madam Speaker, I am saddened to take part in today's tribute to our colleague Gabrielle Giffords, who was so senselessly shot this weekend; her outreach coordinator, Gabe Zimmerman, who was killed in the line of duty during the incident; two other staff who were wounded while supporting the Congresswoman; and all of those who were killed, wounded, and impacted by this terrible tragedy.

Congresswoman Giffords was performing the most fundamental duty of a Member of Congress, listening to her constituents. All Members of Congress take the role of being an advocate for [Page: H157]

their constituents seriously. For Congresswoman Giffords, it's promoting solar energy production to boost the local economy, or being a voice for military families, and working to secure the border with Mexico.

Today I stand here to say not as a Republican, not as a Democrat, but as an American that violence has no place in our society. And I wish and pray for peace and justice for all of those who have been involved in this tragedy.

My thoughts and prayers, as well of those of my family and the people of Ohio's Third District, remain with Congresswoman Giffords, her staff, her constituents, and their families.

12:13 PM EST

Eni Faleomavaega, D-AS

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Madam Speaker, our hearts and prayers go out to our colleague and friend Gabby Giffords and her family. And equally noted are six of her constituents and fellow Americans who died as a result of this tragic incident, and several others who were injured and wounded at this time. We also pray for God's good grace and comforting Spirit to be upon them as well.

I deeply appreciate the initiative and leadership of both parties to bring this resolution to the floor for consideration, not only to give special tribute to our colleague and friend Gabby Giffords, for her courage and commitment to public service, but to also give us all an opportunity to seriously reflect on what we need to do to change the atmosphere, if you will, of what we do and say not only among ourselves, but to our fellow Americans throughout this great Nation of ours.

I'm not much for giving speeches, Madam Speaker. But today I felt it was important that our friend and colleague Gabby Giffords needs to know how much we all appreciate her friendship and admire her character and her courage to be an example of what true public service is about. One great lesson I learned from Gabby Giffords is her comment that words do have consequences. And I have also learned a couple more phrases--cut the rhetoric, let's lower the temperature in our discourse

with one another.

And there is also an island expression that goes like this: E pala le ma'a ae le pala le tala--meaning while rocks and stones may deteriorate or erode, words never die. I pray we will find that balance and move our country forward to solve the problems our country is greatly confronted with at this time.

12:15 PM EST

Mike Pence, R-IN 6th

Mr. PENCE. I thank the distinguished majority leader for yielding time.

Like every American, I will never forget where I was last Saturday. My wife and I were shocked and saddened when we learned of the attack on our colleague Gabby Giffords, her staff, and her constituents. Gabby's a hard worker, a talented legislator. But as has been said poignantly on this floor so much better than I will ever be able to today, she is a dear person and a unique individual who is universally liked in the House of Representatives.

We are praying for her recovery, the recovery of all those injured, and the comfort of the families of the fallen. I rise with gratitude to the leadership of both parties in this institution for moving this thoughtful resolution to the floor. Today the American people speak with one voice. We will condemn these unspeakable and evil acts. We will remember the injured and the lost. And we will gently reaffirm our ideals.

This act was an unspeakable act of violence. And those responsible must be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. But as we mourn with those who mourn, two words of gentle admonition. First, we cannot fear free assembly because of the acts of a single assailant. We live in an open society and enjoy representative democracy under our Constitution. Our system depends on regular and informal contact with our elected Representatives. And neither the public nor its servants should be dissuaded

from participating in public assembly because of the despicable acts of a single deranged person.

Lastly, I understand the pain that Saturday last has caused for so many in this body and around the country. But we cannot fear free and open debate. Democracy depends on heavy doses of civility. And as my colleagues know, I have always sought to model that, here on the floor and elsewhere. We should always refrain from engaging in personal verbal attacks against those with whom we differ on important questions of the day.

But let me say we must also resist, in these moments of heartache, the temptation to assign blame to those with whom we differ for the acts of others. No expressed opinion on the left or the right was to blame for Saturday's attack. And we must resist efforts to suggest otherwise. Because to do so has the potential to inhibit and erode our freedom.

So we rise to mourn with those who mourn, to grieve with those who grieve. We cannot fail to be moved by the tragic events in Arizona. We must not fail to pray earnestly for all those affected. And we will not fail to defend our freedom lest it be one more victim of the horrific event in Tucson on Saturday last.

12:15 PM EST

Mike Pence, R-IN 6th

Mr. PENCE. I thank the distinguished majority leader for yielding time.

Like every American, I will never forget where I was last Saturday. My wife and I were shocked and saddened when we learned of the attack on our colleague Gabby Giffords, her staff, and her constituents. Gabby's a hard worker, a talented legislator. But as has been said poignantly on this floor so much better than I will ever be able to today, she is a dear person and a unique individual who is universally liked in the House of Representatives.

We are praying for her recovery, the recovery of all those injured, and the comfort of the families of the fallen. I rise with gratitude to the leadership of both parties in this institution for moving this thoughtful resolution to the floor. Today the American people speak with one voice. We will condemn these unspeakable and evil acts. We will remember the injured and the lost. And we will gently reaffirm our ideals.

This act was an unspeakable act of violence. And those responsible must be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. But as we mourn with those who mourn, two words of gentle admonition. First, we cannot fear free assembly because of the acts of a single assailant. We live in an open society and enjoy representative democracy under our Constitution. Our system depends on regular and informal contact with our elected Representatives. And neither the public nor its servants should be dissuaded

from participating in public assembly because of the despicable acts of a single deranged person.

Lastly, I understand the pain that Saturday last has caused for so many in this body and around the country. But we cannot fear free and open debate. Democracy depends on heavy doses of civility. And as my colleagues know, I have always sought to model that, here on the floor and elsewhere. We should always refrain from engaging in personal verbal attacks against those with whom we differ on important questions of the day.

But let me say we must also resist, in these moments of heartache, the temptation to assign blame to those with whom we differ for the acts of others. No expressed opinion on the left or the right was to blame for Saturday's attack. And we must resist efforts to suggest otherwise. Because to do so has the potential to inhibit and erode our freedom.

So we rise to mourn with those who mourn, to grieve with those who grieve. We cannot fail to be moved by the tragic events in Arizona. We must not fail to pray earnestly for all those affected. And we will not fail to defend our freedom lest it be one more victim of the horrific event in Tucson on Saturday last.

12:18 PM EST

Brian Higgins, D-NY 27th

Mr. HIGGINS. I thank the gentleman for yielding.

Madam Speaker, the outpouring of support from every corner of western New York for the victims of the attack in Tucson has been overwhelming and inspiring.

It is on behalf of western New York that I offer our prayers to my friend and colleague, Gabby Giffords, and to all the injured and our sympathies to the families and friends of Gabe Zimmerman, John Roll, Phyllis Schneck, Dorwan Stoddard, and Christina Taylor Green.

Some are suggesting that violence-themed political rhetoric contributed to this tragedy. I think it would be wise to reflect on how we characterize our political opponents and how we conduct our debate. Undoubtedly our debate could benefit from more light and less heat, from more humility and less hostility.

But this attack was carried out by a man who appears to have been severely mentally ill, and we may never understand why he did what it is he did.

Our best response to this atrocity is to reject fear and intimidation and to embrace the work in our communities with joy, openness, and dedication. That is the type of public service that Gabby believes in, and I urge my colleagues to follow her example.

12:20 PM EST

John Kline, R-MN 2nd

Mr. KLINE. I thank the gentleman for yielding.

Madam Speaker, Saturday was a dark day for the residents of Tucson, Arizona, and our Nation.

In the blink of an eye the lives of men, women and children who were going about their daily routines were forever changed. One troubled, twisted soul robbed six innocent individuals of their lives and cast a dark shadow over a fundamental right of our democracy, the exchange of ideas between a Representative and the community she represents.

Madam Speaker, in an effort to find meaning in this tragedy, it is tempting to assign blame or to draw conclusions in support of a larger pattern, but what we witnessed this weekend is void of rationale. We must recognize the disaster for the senseless act it is, but we should not stop there.

As the men and women we represent mourn those who were lost and rally to support a brave public servant who is battling for her life, we in this body have a responsibility to lead the way. We must demonstrate our resolve to continue the important work of listening to our constituents and legislating on their behalf. We must press on, undeterred by panic, in carrying out the work we have been elected to do. We must demonstrate that America is strong, her institutions are unshakeable, and her people

are brave and determined.

Madam Speaker, I join my colleagues in expressing condolences to the family and friends of the victims of this tragedy and sending my prayers to our colleague, Gabby Giffords, in her time of [Page: H158]

need. May she find the strength to recover and join us in leading the way forward.

12:22 PM EST

Betty McCollum, D-MN 4th

Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, this House and this entire Nation extend our support, love and best wishes to our colleague, Representative Gabrielle Giffords, and to all those wounded in Saturday's shooting. We also mourn the deaths, the tragic senseless deaths of six Americans who were participating in street-corner democracy with their Congresswoman.

My Minnesota constituents feel the pain and loss inflicted by a few seconds of gun violence. A St. Paul constituent visited my office on Monday and wrote a note to Congresswoman Giffords, and the note said: ``I pray for your recovery. I want you to be strong and continue to be the fighter that you are so you can continue to serve the people of America.''

I too am praying for you, Gabby, for Mark, for your family, and for all of the families who are in pain and those in mourning.

May such unspeakable acts of violence end in this country, and may all Americans find the strength to live in peace.

12:22 PM EST

Betty McCollum, D-MN 4th

Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, this House and this entire Nation extend our support, love and best wishes to our colleague, Representative Gabrielle Giffords, and to all those wounded in Saturday's shooting. We also mourn the deaths, the tragic senseless deaths of six Americans who were participating in street-corner democracy with their Congresswoman.

My Minnesota constituents feel the pain and loss inflicted by a few seconds of gun violence. A St. Paul constituent visited my office on Monday and wrote a note to Congresswoman Giffords, and the note said: ``I pray for your recovery. I want you to be strong and continue to be the fighter that you are so you can continue to serve the people of America.''

I too am praying for you, Gabby, for Mark, for your family, and for all of the families who are in pain and those in mourning.

May such unspeakable acts of violence end in this country, and may all Americans find the strength to live in peace.

12:23 PM EST

Kevin McCarthy, R-CA 22nd

Mr. McCARTHY of California. I thank the gentleman.

Madam Speaker, I recall a short time ago, after the election in 2006, I came in a freshman class. All the Members here, when they come here together right after the election, they get together as freshmen. You have gone through a debate, you have gone through an election, and you look around and you are meeting people from across the country.

I remember in that class when we looked across there were a lot of different people, but Gabby's smile just lights up the room. She didn't sit back to wait to talk to everybody on different sides of the aisle. She did it just as she has done every day on this floor, walked right up, introduced herself and says how can we work together. When you look just last week, Gabby was sitting on this floor, standing right in this well, reading the Constitution, the First Amendment, going

home, doing what she has done many times before, listening to her constituents, what all of us do.

What has transpired, we cannot let happen. We cannot be deterred, just from that same aspect that Gabby gives the strength as she fights right now, and we cannot forget those that lost their lives.

We cannot forget the Federal Chief District Justice John Roll; Gabe Zimmerman, working for Gabby's staff; 9-year-old Christina Taylor Green, being elected in student council, just wanting to meet her Representative and a neighbor taking her down; also Dorothy Morris, Dorwan Stoddard or Phyllis Schneck, doing what they thought was every American's right to do and give their opinion.

That's what this floor has to be committed to, that's what this floor has to continue to fight. That is exactly what Gabby continues to fight for and will continue as we go.

12:26 PM EST

John Garamendi, D-CA 10th

Mr. GARAMENDI. Madam Speaker, on behalf of the men and women of the 10th Congressional District, I rise in support of this resolution and bring to this floor their condolences and prayers for the six who were murdered in Tucson and for Gabby and for her speedy recovery.

Patti and I send along our own special prayers and condolences. For those of us that have had the privilege of working with Gabrielle, I add my own special thoughts.

I came to the Committee on Science and Technology where she was the chairwoman of the Subcommittee on Space and immediately saw her incredible intelligence, her charm and wit as she conducted numerous hearings, and came to understand her commitment to America's science and technology and space as she led our committee to the reauthorization of the NASA programs.

I look forward to her speedy recovery and her return to this floor, where she can once again provide her talents and her leadership as she would once again lead us in our efforts to bring about a better understanding, not only of the space and this role of our planet in the cosmos, but also our own personal understanding to each other and to our constituents.

It was a sad day on Saturday, and it will be a bright future when Gabrielle returns to this floor.

12:27 PM EST

Eric Cantor, R-VA 7th

Mr. CANTOR. Madam Speaker, it is now my honor to yield 3 minutes to the chairman of the Republican Conference, the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Hensarling).

12:28 PM EST

Jeb Hensarling, R-TX 5th

Mr. HENSARLING. I appreciate the gentleman from Virginia, the distinguished majority leader, for yielding.

Madam Speaker, I haven't come to the House floor with any prepared remarks. Frankly, I am not sure my vocabulary, I am not sure my thoughts can do the moment justice.

I would say, in the victim that we know, Congresswoman Giffords, Gabby, if there is a sweeter, a kinder, a more gentle Member of the House, I know not their name.

So many of us consider her to be a friend. I think if there were a poll of Members of the House, she would probably be voted least likely to offend any human being, which makes this incident, this tragedy so unfathomable. We all pray for her full recovery. This House is not whole without her smile, without her voice, without her presence.

Madam Speaker, I did not know Gabe Zimmerman; but I know a lot of great Americans, young people, who decide to dedicate themselves to public service and work on my staff, and I know how they are a part of my extended family.

[Time: 12:30]

I didn't know Dorwan Stoddard, Phyllis Schneck, Dorothy Morris, but they're parents, they're grandparents, they're spouses, and we think of our own family. I didn't know Judge John Roll. But, again, somebody who committed their life to public service. And last but not least I don't know Christina Taylor Green. I didn't have that pleasure. A 9-year-old child thrilled to learn about our representative democracy and brought down in an act of evil. I never met her. But I think about my 8-year-old

daughter, and I think about my 7-year-old son, and how they learn about their father's business.

And so all of us come together in this time of mourning but this time of resolution. We mourn the loss of these great American citizens, but we resolve that the representative democracy, that the traditions of the House will not be a casualty of this tragedy. The people's House will be open. The Members representative will be accessible. It can be no different in this country.

12:31 PM EST

Jeb Hensarling, R-TX 5th

Mr. HENSARLING. We cannot allow the tragedy to be compounded by changing the way we conduct the people's business. This cannot happen. And so we come here today to mourn, but we come here to be resolved that this individual who is responsible for a heinous, evil act will not succeed in interfering with the people's business in the people's House. Godspeed in her recovery to Gabby, our colleague.

12:32 PM EST

Rush Holt, D-NJ 12th

Mr. HOLT. I thank the gentleman.

Madam Speaker, we come to the floor with respect, compassion and yes, love for those who have lost loved ones in Tucson last Saturday and for those who are recovering from the physical and psychological wounds. We also come to pay tribute and show love and send our best wishes to Representative Giffords and to Mark Kelly. I hope they feel our love. Our colleague is a beautiful person and everything one would want in a congressional representative--thoughtful, engaged, compassionate,

optimistic and a genuinely good person. We also recognize those who responded, staff members quietly going about making democracy work, bystanders, medical responders and [Page: H159]

surgeons, ordinary people doing extraordinary things.

This hits us on more than a personal level, though. Each year, there are many thousands of Americans felled by gunfire. Each is a personal tragedy to the victim's loved ones. The Tucson shooting strikes a blow to our ability to govern ourselves, to maintain a peaceful society. The rights to assembly peaceably and to speak freely are preserved not just for their own sake, but, as the geniuses who established this country recognized, it is through those rights that we can create a society that

protects and extends life, liberty and happiness.

There are lessons to be drawn from the events about our understanding of people with mental illness and their screening and treatment. There are lessons to be drawn about our gun crazy culture. There are lessons to be drawn about the ever-present inflammatory, dehumanizing rhetoric, but let us defer those discussions for the moment and recognize that we are a strong, prosperous and supportive country because of our representative democracy and our freedom to assemble and speak.

12:32 PM EST

Rush Holt, D-NJ 12th

Mr. HOLT. I thank the gentleman.

Madam Speaker, we come to the floor with respect, compassion and yes, love for those who have lost loved ones in Tucson last Saturday and for those who are recovering from the physical and psychological wounds. We also come to pay tribute and show love and send our best wishes to Representative Giffords and to Mark Kelly. I hope they feel our love. Our colleague is a beautiful person and everything one would want in a congressional representative--thoughtful, engaged, compassionate,

optimistic and a genuinely good person. We also recognize those who responded, staff members quietly going about making democracy work, bystanders, medical responders and [Page: H159]

surgeons, ordinary people doing extraordinary things.

This hits us on more than a personal level, though. Each year, there are many thousands of Americans felled by gunfire. Each is a personal tragedy to the victim's loved ones. The Tucson shooting strikes a blow to our ability to govern ourselves, to maintain a peaceful society. The rights to assembly peaceably and to speak freely are preserved not just for their own sake, but, as the geniuses who established this country recognized, it is through those rights that we can create a society that

protects and extends life, liberty and happiness.

There are lessons to be drawn from the events about our understanding of people with mental illness and their screening and treatment. There are lessons to be drawn about our gun crazy culture. There are lessons to be drawn about the ever-present inflammatory, dehumanizing rhetoric, but let us defer those discussions for the moment and recognize that we are a strong, prosperous and supportive country because of our representative democracy and our freedom to assemble and speak.

12:34 PM EST

Rush Holt, D-NJ 12th

Mr. HOLT. Let us in Congress not withdraw. Let us hold more outreach, more town halls, more sidewalk office hours. And let us, in the words of Representative Giffords delivered here on the floor of the House, let us agree to forgo some of our individual interests and intemperance to allow the space for open dialogue, debate and discussion.

12:35 PM EST

Peter Roskam, R-IL 6th

Mr. ROSKAM. Madam Speaker, I thank the leader for yielding.

You know, one of the untold stories of the House of Representatives is the connections that Members have with one another that really never show up, except among ourselves. I had a unique connection with Gabrielle Giffords, I still do, and that is when we came in in this class of 2006, we were both invited to participate, one on one or two together, in a series of interviews that was hosted by National Public Radio, the show All Things Considered. I had not met Gabrielle before

that and we started this dialogue back and forth and really enjoyed that. And I found that she had this very refreshing and winsome approach, as we all know, to how she would handle herself and how she conducts herself.

So it's really no surprise to me that we're hearing hopeful news about her medical condition based on a disposition of perseverance. And I thought that the conversations that I was involved in with her brought a brightness to public life and brought something that as I heard from constituents that would listen to her, they would say to me, I can see how you would like serving with people like that. And that is sort of the lost lead, I think, in some ways about the House of Representatives.

We were heartsick on Saturday when we heard that news. I know many of my constituents who are to their knees in prayer for Gabrielle and for the victims of that shooting. And so as I think we all reflect on the gift that we have been given, we have a great example in Gabrielle Giffords in somebody who understands the nature of democracy and real willingness to serve, and we wish her the very best and pray for her complete recovery.

12:37 PM EST

Ed Perlmutter, D-CO 7th

Mr. PERLMUTTER. I thank the gentleman from Arizona.

Madam Speaker, I had the opportunity to know Gabby before we were elected to the Congress. She was in the State legislature in Arizona; I was in the State legislature in Colorado. She was one of the youngest people ever elected to the State legislature there in Arizona and she has been a friend of mine for some time now. I am having a hard time processing what actually occurred last Saturday to her and to those other people. Our prayers obviously are with her, with the families of those

who were murdered, and for the swift recovery of everybody who was injured in that shooting. I rise in support of the resolution and I thank the leadership for bringing it.

The second paragraph of the resolution says, Whereas on January 8, 2011, an armed gunman opened fire at a ``Congress on Your Corner'' event hosted by Representative Gabrielle Giffords in Tucson.

I want to explain what it was she was doing, because it's at the heart of our democracy. We've heard about it from other speakers. We do something like Gabby's ``Congress on Your Corner,'' which we call, ``Government in the Grocery.'' Other Congressmen and women do similar things. It's about listening to your constituents. It's about being accessible in a less formal setting than on the floor of the House of Representatives or in an assembly hall but where people feel comfortable talking

to you. So comfortable and so successful was her ``Congress on the Corner'' that she had the littlest, most innocent person in Christina Taylor Green, a 9-year-old, to one of Arizona's most powerful, experienced people, in the chief district judge, John Roll, coming to a very informal setting, at a grocery store, to talk about America, to talk about their hopes, their desires, their concerns. This is what it's all about.

12:39 PM EST

Ed Perlmutter, D-CO 7th

Mr. PERLMUTTER. This woman was conducting something so essential to the fabric of our democracy.

[Time: 12:40]

And to the grocery stores, the coffee shops, and the flea markets, those that provide these venues where people feel comfortable to come and express their views, just, thank you.

I do these kinds of events every other Saturday. We obviously have to work with the different grocery stores and law enforcement to see if we can continue to operate in these fashions, but this is what it's all about.

Gabby Giffords is as good as they get. We pray for her speedy recovery, and we thank her for her service.

12:40 PM EST

Eric Cantor, R-VA 7th

Mr. CANTOR. Madam Speaker, it's now my honor to yield 2 minutes to the chairman of the Rules Committee, the gentleman from California (Mr. Dreier).