4:39 PM EDT

Blake Randolph Farenthold, R-TX 27th

Mr. FARENTHOLD. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 1813) to redesignate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 162 Northeast Avenue in Tallmadge, Ohio, as the ``Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin Post Office Building'', as amended.

The Clerk read the title of the bill.

The text of the bill is as follows:

H.R. 1813

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. LANCE CORPORAL DANIEL NATHAN DEYARMIN, JR., POST OFFICE BUILDING.

(a) Redesignation.--The facility of the United States Postal Service located at 162 Northeast Avenue in Tallmadge, Ohio, shall be known and designated as the ``Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin, Jr., Post Office Building''.

(b) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, paper, or other record of the United States to the facility referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed to be a reference to the ``Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin, Jr., Post Office Building''.

4:39 PM EDT

Blake Randolph Farenthold, R-TX 27th

Mr. FARENTHOLD. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 1813) to redesignate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 162 Northeast Avenue in Tallmadge, Ohio, as the ``Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin Post Office Building'', as amended.

The Clerk read the title of the bill.

The text of the bill is as follows:

H.R. 1813

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. LANCE CORPORAL DANIEL NATHAN DEYARMIN, JR., POST OFFICE BUILDING.

(a) Redesignation.--The facility of the United States Postal Service located at 162 Northeast Avenue in Tallmadge, Ohio, shall be known and designated as the ``Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin, Jr., Post Office Building''.

(b) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, paper, or other record of the United States to the facility referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed to be a reference to the ``Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin, Jr., Post Office Building''.

4:39 PM EDT

Tim Ryan, D-OH 13th

Mr. RYAN of Ohio. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank the gentleman from Texas for his kind words as well.

Madam Speaker, from the Book of Isaiah, chapter 6, verse 8:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send? And I said, Here I am. Send me.

Nate said, Send me, when his country asked and he was looking for a way to serve. He joined the Marine Corps.

Lance Corporal Deyarmin was born on July 30, 1983. He was named after his father, but they started calling him ``Nate.'' They moved to Tallmadge, in our congressional district, when he was 1 1/2 years old. He lived there his whole life. His family said he was a homeboy from Tallmadge. Nate went to school there and played sports there. He lived there and he made friends there.

Nate joined the Marine Corps as his way of serving, but when you read about his life, the interesting thing--and what we are celebrating here--is [Page: H2574]

that he said, Send me, from the very early stages of his life here on Earth.

When his great grandfather was 89 years old and bedridden, it was little Nate that jumped into the bed and started playing Legos to engage his great grandfather to make him feel better. They had this little game they would play where his grandfather would move his false teeth in and out of his mouth and little Nate would try and grab the teeth. A few years later, when the great grandfather died, Nate had an opportunity to pick whatever he wanted of his great grandfather's--and he picked the false

teeth.

I think that is the kind of spirit that Nate brought to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and to our country.

While driving down the road on his way to school, if there happened to be someone walking to school who didn't have a driver's license, Nate was the kind of guy that stopped and picked that person up and took them to school.

[Time: 16:45]

Nate said: Send me.

If someone was bullying someone at school and Nate was there, Nate was the guy who got in the middle of it and made sure that no one was bullied. He said: Send me.

If a family was having trouble, Nate would stop by the house, make sure everything was going okay. Nate said: Send me.

So now, those of us who drive by this post office in Tallmadge, Ohio, we will look up, we will see Nate's name, and we will not only remember his name or his service, but how his life challenges all of us in some way, shape, or form, in every little interaction, to say and answer the call when we are asked: Send me.

4:39 PM EDT

Tim Ryan, D-OH 13th

Mr. RYAN of Ohio. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank the gentleman from Texas for his kind words as well.

Madam Speaker, from the Book of Isaiah, chapter 6, verse 8:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send? And I said, Here I am. Send me.

Nate said, Send me, when his country asked and he was looking for a way to serve. He joined the Marine Corps.

Lance Corporal Deyarmin was born on July 30, 1983. He was named after his father, but they started calling him ``Nate.'' They moved to Tallmadge, in our congressional district, when he was 1 1/2 years old. He lived there his whole life. His family said he was a homeboy from Tallmadge. Nate went to school there and played sports there. He lived there and he made friends there.

Nate joined the Marine Corps as his way of serving, but when you read about his life, the interesting thing--and what we are celebrating here--is [Page: H2574]

that he said, Send me, from the very early stages of his life here on Earth.

When his great grandfather was 89 years old and bedridden, it was little Nate that jumped into the bed and started playing Legos to engage his great grandfather to make him feel better. They had this little game they would play where his grandfather would move his false teeth in and out of his mouth and little Nate would try and grab the teeth. A few years later, when the great grandfather died, Nate had an opportunity to pick whatever he wanted of his great grandfather's--and he picked the false

teeth.

I think that is the kind of spirit that Nate brought to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and to our country.

While driving down the road on his way to school, if there happened to be someone walking to school who didn't have a driver's license, Nate was the kind of guy that stopped and picked that person up and took them to school.

[Time: 16:45]

Nate said: Send me.

If someone was bullying someone at school and Nate was there, Nate was the guy who got in the middle of it and made sure that no one was bullied. He said: Send me.

If a family was having trouble, Nate would stop by the house, make sure everything was going okay. Nate said: Send me.

So now, those of us who drive by this post office in Tallmadge, Ohio, we will look up, we will see Nate's name, and we will not only remember his name or his service, but how his life challenges all of us in some way, shape, or form, in every little interaction, to say and answer the call when we are asked: Send me.

4:40 PM EDT

Blake Randolph Farenthold, R-TX 27th

Mr. FARENTHOLD. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

H.R. 1813 was introduced by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ryan) and would redesignate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 162 Northeast Avenue in Tallmadge, Ohio, as the Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin Post Office Building.

Marine Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin, Jr., who went by ``Nathan,'' was born on July 30, 1983, in Akron, Ohio. His family moved to Tallmadge when he was just a year and a half old, and Nathan grew up there. He was a 2002 graduate of Tallmadge High School.

Nathan joined the Marines in 2003, and served with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division. In March of 2005, Nathan was deployed to Iraq. Sadly, just 5 months later, he was killed on August 1 by enemy small arms fire while conducting dismounted operations outside Haditha. Five other marines died at his side.

Madam Speaker, Representative Ryan's staff shared with me that when Nathan was asked why he wanted to join the military, he said that he ``wanted a brother'' and that he ``wanted to become a respectable, responsible, productive American.'' He certainly achieved all of those goals.

In the eyes of his family, friends, fellow marines, countrymen, and those of us standing here today to honor his tremendous sacrifice, he is one of the most respected Americans this body has had the great privilege of honoring. Those brave men and women who put themselves in harm's way to defend our safety and freedom deserve our honor, respect, and heartfelt gratitude.

I ask my colleagues for their strong support of H.R. 1813, and I reserve the balance of my time.

4:40 PM EDT

Blake Randolph Farenthold, R-TX 27th

Mr. FARENTHOLD. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

H.R. 1813 was introduced by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ryan) and would redesignate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 162 Northeast Avenue in Tallmadge, Ohio, as the Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin Post Office Building.

Marine Lance Corporal Daniel Nathan Deyarmin, Jr., who went by ``Nathan,'' was born on July 30, 1983, in Akron, Ohio. His family moved to Tallmadge when he was just a year and a half old, and Nathan grew up there. He was a 2002 graduate of Tallmadge High School.

Nathan joined the Marines in 2003, and served with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division. In March of 2005, Nathan was deployed to Iraq. Sadly, just 5 months later, he was killed on August 1 by enemy small arms fire while conducting dismounted operations outside Haditha. Five other marines died at his side.

Madam Speaker, Representative Ryan's staff shared with me that when Nathan was asked why he wanted to join the military, he said that he ``wanted a brother'' and that he ``wanted to become a respectable, responsible, productive American.'' He certainly achieved all of those goals.

In the eyes of his family, friends, fellow marines, countrymen, and those of us standing here today to honor his tremendous sacrifice, he is one of the most respected Americans this body has had the great privilege of honoring. Those brave men and women who put themselves in harm's way to defend our safety and freedom deserve our honor, respect, and heartfelt gratitude.

I ask my colleagues for their strong support of H.R. 1813, and I reserve the balance of my time.

4:42 PM EDT

Tim Ryan, D-OH 13th

Mr. RYAN of Ohio. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank the gentleman from Texas for his kind words as well.

Madam Speaker, from the Book of Isaiah, chapter 6, verse 8:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send? And I said, Here I am. Send me.

Nate said, Send me, when his country asked and he was looking for a way to serve. He joined the Marine Corps.

Lance Corporal Deyarmin was born on July 30, 1983. He was named after his father, but they started calling him ``Nate.'' They moved to Tallmadge, in our congressional district, when he was 1 1/2 years old. He lived there his whole life. His family said he was a homeboy from Tallmadge. Nate went to school there and played sports there. He lived there and he made friends there.

Nate joined the Marine Corps as his way of serving, but when you read about his life, the interesting thing--and what we are celebrating here--is [Page: H2574]

that he said, Send me, from the very early stages of his life here on Earth.

When his great grandfather was 89 years old and bedridden, it was little Nate that jumped into the bed and started playing Legos to engage his great grandfather to make him feel better. They had this little game they would play where his grandfather would move his false teeth in and out of his mouth and little Nate would try and grab the teeth. A few years later, when the great grandfather died, Nate had an opportunity to pick whatever he wanted of his great grandfather's--and he picked the false

teeth.

I think that is the kind of spirit that Nate brought to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and to our country.

While driving down the road on his way to school, if there happened to be someone walking to school who didn't have a driver's license, Nate was the kind of guy that stopped and picked that person up and took them to school.

[Time: 16:45]

Nate said: Send me.

If someone was bullying someone at school and Nate was there, Nate was the guy who got in the middle of it and made sure that no one was bullied. He said: Send me.

If a family was having trouble, Nate would stop by the house, make sure everything was going okay. Nate said: Send me.

So now, those of us who drive by this post office in Tallmadge, Ohio, we will look up, we will see Nate's name, and we will not only remember his name or his service, but how his life challenges all of us in some way, shape, or form, in every little interaction, to say and answer the call when we are asked: Send me.

4:42 PM EDT

Tim Ryan, D-OH 13th

Mr. RYAN of Ohio. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank the gentleman from Texas for his kind words as well.

Madam Speaker, from the Book of Isaiah, chapter 6, verse 8:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send? And I said, Here I am. Send me.

Nate said, Send me, when his country asked and he was looking for a way to serve. He joined the Marine Corps.

Lance Corporal Deyarmin was born on July 30, 1983. He was named after his father, but they started calling him ``Nate.'' They moved to Tallmadge, in our congressional district, when he was 1 1/2 years old. He lived there his whole life. His family said he was a homeboy from Tallmadge. Nate went to school there and played sports there. He lived there and he made friends there.

Nate joined the Marine Corps as his way of serving, but when you read about his life, the interesting thing--and what we are celebrating here--is [Page: H2574]

that he said, Send me, from the very early stages of his life here on Earth.

When his great grandfather was 89 years old and bedridden, it was little Nate that jumped into the bed and started playing Legos to engage his great grandfather to make him feel better. They had this little game they would play where his grandfather would move his false teeth in and out of his mouth and little Nate would try and grab the teeth. A few years later, when the great grandfather died, Nate had an opportunity to pick whatever he wanted of his great grandfather's--and he picked the false

teeth.

I think that is the kind of spirit that Nate brought to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and to our country.

While driving down the road on his way to school, if there happened to be someone walking to school who didn't have a driver's license, Nate was the kind of guy that stopped and picked that person up and took them to school.

[Time: 16:45]

Nate said: Send me.

If someone was bullying someone at school and Nate was there, Nate was the guy who got in the middle of it and made sure that no one was bullied. He said: Send me.

If a family was having trouble, Nate would stop by the house, make sure everything was going okay. Nate said: Send me.

So now, those of us who drive by this post office in Tallmadge, Ohio, we will look up, we will see Nate's name, and we will not only remember his name or his service, but how his life challenges all of us in some way, shape, or form, in every little interaction, to say and answer the call when we are asked: Send me.

4:42 PM EDT

Tim Ryan, D-OH 13th

Mr. RYAN of Ohio. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank the gentleman from Texas for his kind words as well.

Madam Speaker, from the Book of Isaiah, chapter 6, verse 8:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send? And I said, Here I am. Send me.

Nate said, Send me, when his country asked and he was looking for a way to serve. He joined the Marine Corps.

Lance Corporal Deyarmin was born on July 30, 1983. He was named after his father, but they started calling him ``Nate.'' They moved to Tallmadge, in our congressional district, when he was 1 1/2 years old. He lived there his whole life. His family said he was a homeboy from Tallmadge. Nate went to school there and played sports there. He lived there and he made friends there.

Nate joined the Marine Corps as his way of serving, but when you read about his life, the interesting thing--and what we are celebrating here--is [Page: H2574]

that he said, Send me, from the very early stages of his life here on Earth.

When his great grandfather was 89 years old and bedridden, it was little Nate that jumped into the bed and started playing Legos to engage his great grandfather to make him feel better. They had this little game they would play where his grandfather would move his false teeth in and out of his mouth and little Nate would try and grab the teeth. A few years later, when the great grandfather died, Nate had an opportunity to pick whatever he wanted of his great grandfather's--and he picked the false

teeth.

I think that is the kind of spirit that Nate brought to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and to our country.

While driving down the road on his way to school, if there happened to be someone walking to school who didn't have a driver's license, Nate was the kind of guy that stopped and picked that person up and took them to school.

[Time: 16:45]

Nate said: Send me.

If someone was bullying someone at school and Nate was there, Nate was the guy who got in the middle of it and made sure that no one was bullied. He said: Send me.

If a family was having trouble, Nate would stop by the house, make sure everything was going okay. Nate said: Send me.

So now, those of us who drive by this post office in Tallmadge, Ohio, we will look up, we will see Nate's name, and we will not only remember his name or his service, but how his life challenges all of us in some way, shape, or form, in every little interaction, to say and answer the call when we are asked: Send me.

4:42 PM EDT

Tim Ryan, D-OH 13th

Mr. RYAN of Ohio. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank the gentleman from Texas for his kind words as well.

Madam Speaker, from the Book of Isaiah, chapter 6, verse 8:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send? And I said, Here I am. Send me.

Nate said, Send me, when his country asked and he was looking for a way to serve. He joined the Marine Corps.

Lance Corporal Deyarmin was born on July 30, 1983. He was named after his father, but they started calling him ``Nate.'' They moved to Tallmadge, in our congressional district, when he was 1 1/2 years old. He lived there his whole life. His family said he was a homeboy from Tallmadge. Nate went to school there and played sports there. He lived there and he made friends there.

Nate joined the Marine Corps as his way of serving, but when you read about his life, the interesting thing--and what we are celebrating here--is [Page: H2574]

that he said, Send me, from the very early stages of his life here on Earth.

When his great grandfather was 89 years old and bedridden, it was little Nate that jumped into the bed and started playing Legos to engage his great grandfather to make him feel better. They had this little game they would play where his grandfather would move his false teeth in and out of his mouth and little Nate would try and grab the teeth. A few years later, when the great grandfather died, Nate had an opportunity to pick whatever he wanted of his great grandfather's--and he picked the false

teeth.

I think that is the kind of spirit that Nate brought to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and to our country.

While driving down the road on his way to school, if there happened to be someone walking to school who didn't have a driver's license, Nate was the kind of guy that stopped and picked that person up and took them to school.

[Time: 16:45]

Nate said: Send me.

If someone was bullying someone at school and Nate was there, Nate was the guy who got in the middle of it and made sure that no one was bullied. He said: Send me.

If a family was having trouble, Nate would stop by the house, make sure everything was going okay. Nate said: Send me.

So now, those of us who drive by this post office in Tallmadge, Ohio, we will look up, we will see Nate's name, and we will not only remember his name or his service, but how his life challenges all of us in some way, shape, or form, in every little interaction, to say and answer the call when we are asked: Send me.

4:42 PM EDT

Tim Ryan, D-OH 13th

Mr. RYAN of Ohio. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank the gentleman from Texas for his kind words as well.

Madam Speaker, from the Book of Isaiah, chapter 6, verse 8:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send? And I said, Here I am. Send me.

Nate said, Send me, when his country asked and he was looking for a way to serve. He joined the Marine Corps.

Lance Corporal Deyarmin was born on July 30, 1983. He was named after his father, but they started calling him ``Nate.'' They moved to Tallmadge, in our congressional district, when he was 1 1/2 years old. He lived there his whole life. His family said he was a homeboy from Tallmadge. Nate went to school there and played sports there. He lived there and he made friends there.

Nate joined the Marine Corps as his way of serving, but when you read about his life, the interesting thing--and what we are celebrating here--is [Page: H2574]

that he said, Send me, from the very early stages of his life here on Earth.

When his great grandfather was 89 years old and bedridden, it was little Nate that jumped into the bed and started playing Legos to engage his great grandfather to make him feel better. They had this little game they would play where his grandfather would move his false teeth in and out of his mouth and little Nate would try and grab the teeth. A few years later, when the great grandfather died, Nate had an opportunity to pick whatever he wanted of his great grandfather's--and he picked the false

teeth.

I think that is the kind of spirit that Nate brought to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and to our country.

While driving down the road on his way to school, if there happened to be someone walking to school who didn't have a driver's license, Nate was the kind of guy that stopped and picked that person up and took them to school.

[Time: 16:45]

Nate said: Send me.

If someone was bullying someone at school and Nate was there, Nate was the guy who got in the middle of it and made sure that no one was bullied. He said: Send me.

If a family was having trouble, Nate would stop by the house, make sure everything was going okay. Nate said: Send me.

So now, those of us who drive by this post office in Tallmadge, Ohio, we will look up, we will see Nate's name, and we will not only remember his name or his service, but how his life challenges all of us in some way, shape, or form, in every little interaction, to say and answer the call when we are asked: Send me.

4:42 PM EDT

Tim Ryan, D-OH 13th

Mr. RYAN of Ohio. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank the gentleman from Texas for his kind words as well.

Madam Speaker, from the Book of Isaiah, chapter 6, verse 8:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send? And I said, Here I am. Send me.

Nate said, Send me, when his country asked and he was looking for a way to serve. He joined the Marine Corps.

Lance Corporal Deyarmin was born on July 30, 1983. He was named after his father, but they started calling him ``Nate.'' They moved to Tallmadge, in our congressional district, when he was 1 1/2 years old. He lived there his whole life. His family said he was a homeboy from Tallmadge. Nate went to school there and played sports there. He lived there and he made friends there.

Nate joined the Marine Corps as his way of serving, but when you read about his life, the interesting thing--and what we are celebrating here--is [Page: H2574]

that he said, Send me, from the very early stages of his life here on Earth.

When his great grandfather was 89 years old and bedridden, it was little Nate that jumped into the bed and started playing Legos to engage his great grandfather to make him feel better. They had this little game they would play where his grandfather would move his false teeth in and out of his mouth and little Nate would try and grab the teeth. A few years later, when the great grandfather died, Nate had an opportunity to pick whatever he wanted of his great grandfather's--and he picked the false

teeth.

I think that is the kind of spirit that Nate brought to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and to our country.

While driving down the road on his way to school, if there happened to be someone walking to school who didn't have a driver's license, Nate was the kind of guy that stopped and picked that person up and took them to school.

[Time: 16:45]

Nate said: Send me.

If someone was bullying someone at school and Nate was there, Nate was the guy who got in the middle of it and made sure that no one was bullied. He said: Send me.

If a family was having trouble, Nate would stop by the house, make sure everything was going okay. Nate said: Send me.

So now, those of us who drive by this post office in Tallmadge, Ohio, we will look up, we will see Nate's name, and we will not only remember his name or his service, but how his life challenges all of us in some way, shape, or form, in every little interaction, to say and answer the call when we are asked: Send me.

4:45 PM EDT

William Lacy Clay, D-MO 1st

Mr. CLAY. Madam Speaker, I want to thank my friend from Ohio for bringing this bill forward. I ask that we pass the underlying bill, without reservation, to honor Lance Corporal Deyarmin and his steadfast dedication to this country.

I urge the passage of H.R. 1813, and I yield back the balance of my time.