5:09 PM EST

Kathleen Rice, D-NY 4th

Miss RICE of New York. Mr. Speaker, this is the final amendment to the bill, which will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. If adopted, the bill will immediately proceed to final passage, as amended.

Like many of you, especially my fellow freshman Members, I told my constituents of New York City's Fourth Congressional District that I wanted to come to Washington to offer commonsense solutions.

As you heard, the amendment does important things that my friends on the other side of the aisle also find important, such as saving tax dollars and providing regulatory relief for small businesses. The amendment also ensures that H.R. 185 would not stymie protections of workers' wages, especially those of women, or weaken protections against workplace discrimination. But the most important provision in this amendment, in light of current events, would ensure that H.R. 185 won't apply to actions

that prevent terrorism and crime.

As the former District Attorney of Nassau County, just outside of New York City, terrorism is not abstract for me and my constituents. It is very real and it is very personal. Thousands of Long Island residents commute to the city every single day. We all remember too clearly the September 11 attacks, and we all live with the reality that such a day could come again if we are not vigilant in our efforts to prevent terrorism.

The horrendous attacks in France last week serve as a tragic and chilling reminder that we must be on high alert here at home, and the best way to do that is to ensure that those who protect us have the resources they need to do their jobs. That is our job--to make sure they have the resources they need to do theirs.

Mr. Speaker, I will make one final point. A number of freshman Members, myself included, came to Congress with a mandate to find compromise and to govern. Passing H.R. 185 will not demonstrate such priorities. We should be working together to actually solve problems. We should be working to find new ideas and new solutions to our Nation's problems and creating legislation that will make our government work more effectively.

Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

5:09 PM EST

Kathleen Rice, D-NY 4th

Miss RICE of New York. Mr. Speaker, this is the final amendment to the bill, which will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. If adopted, the bill will immediately proceed to final passage, as amended.

Like many of you, especially my fellow freshman Members, I told my constituents of New York City's Fourth Congressional District that I wanted to come to Washington to offer commonsense solutions.

As you heard, the amendment does important things that my friends on the other side of the aisle also find important, such as saving tax dollars and providing regulatory relief for small businesses. The amendment also ensures that H.R. 185 would not stymie protections of workers' wages, especially those of women, or weaken protections against workplace discrimination. But the most important provision in this amendment, in light of current events, would ensure that H.R. 185 won't apply to actions

that prevent terrorism and crime.

As the former District Attorney of Nassau County, just outside of New York City, terrorism is not abstract for me and my constituents. It is very real and it is very personal. Thousands of Long Island residents commute to the city every single day. We all remember too clearly the September 11 attacks, and we all live with the reality that such a day could come again if we are not vigilant in our efforts to prevent terrorism.

The horrendous attacks in France last week serve as a tragic and chilling reminder that we must be on high alert here at home, and the best way to do that is to ensure that those who protect us have the resources they need to do their jobs. That is our job--to make sure they have the resources they need to do theirs.

Mr. Speaker, I will make one final point. A number of freshman Members, myself included, came to Congress with a mandate to find compromise and to govern. Passing H.R. 185 will not demonstrate such priorities. We should be working together to actually solve problems. We should be working to find new ideas and new solutions to our Nation's problems and creating legislation that will make our government work more effectively.

Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

5:12 PM EST

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, we are more than 6 years into the Obama administration. Real unemployment is still a massive problem in this country. America's labor force participation has dropped to record lows. The nominal unemployment rate is down, but that is because desperate Americans dying for work are abandoning the workforce in droves.

The only real, long-term solution is to restart the engines of economic growth in this country. One way to do that is to pass the Regulatory Accountability Act. This bill promises real relief from our $1.86 trillion-per-year regulatory cost nightmare. If enacted, it would change night to day in terms of the level of regulatory costs Washington imposes on American families--without stopping one needed regulation from being issued.

My friends across the aisle say that won't happen. They say the bill will bring all good rulemaking to a halt. My goodness, it is ObamaCare all over again. My friends across the aisle haven't read the bill. You have to read the bill to know what is in it. If you read the bill, you understand it. You see right there on page 27:

The agency shall adopt the least costly rule considered during the rule making ..... that meets relevant statutory objectives.

Take away a few key words and what does that say?

The agency shall adopt the ..... rule ..... that meets ..... statutory objectives.

So the rules will still be made and statutory goals will still be met, but they will be done in a cost-effective way that makes sure that all of the necessary cost-saving measures and all of the necessary considerations are taken into account before imposing new burdens on the American people.

[Time: 17:15]

Vote against this motion to recommit. Vote for this good, job-creating, dollar-saving bill for the American people.

Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

5:12 PM EST

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, we are more than 6 years into the Obama administration. Real unemployment is still a massive problem in this country. America's labor force participation has dropped to record lows. The nominal unemployment rate is down, but that is because desperate Americans dying for work are abandoning the workforce in droves.

The only real, long-term solution is to restart the engines of economic growth in this country. One way to do that is to pass the Regulatory Accountability Act. This bill promises real relief from our $1.86 trillion-per-year regulatory cost nightmare. If enacted, it would change night to day in terms of the level of regulatory costs Washington imposes on American families--without stopping one needed regulation from being issued.

My friends across the aisle say that won't happen. They say the bill will bring all good rulemaking to a halt. My goodness, it is ObamaCare all over again. My friends across the aisle haven't read the bill. You have to read the bill to know what is in it. If you read the bill, you understand it. You see right there on page 27:

The agency shall adopt the least costly rule considered during the rule making ..... that meets relevant statutory objectives.

Take away a few key words and what does that say?

The agency shall adopt the ..... rule ..... that meets ..... statutory objectives.

So the rules will still be made and statutory goals will still be met, but they will be done in a cost-effective way that makes sure that all of the necessary cost-saving measures and all of the necessary considerations are taken into account before imposing new burdens on the American people.

[Time: 17:15]

Vote against this motion to recommit. Vote for this good, job-creating, dollar-saving bill for the American people.

Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

5:13 PM EST

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, we are more than 6 years into the Obama administration. Real unemployment is still a massive problem in this country. America's labor force participation has dropped to record lows. The nominal unemployment rate is down, but that is because desperate Americans dying for work are abandoning the workforce in droves.

The only real, long-term solution is to restart the engines of economic growth in this country. One way to do that is to pass the Regulatory Accountability Act. This bill promises real relief from our $1.86 trillion-per-year regulatory cost nightmare. If enacted, it would change night to day in terms of the level of regulatory costs Washington imposes on American families--without stopping one needed regulation from being issued.

My friends across the aisle say that won't happen. They say the bill will bring all good rulemaking to a halt. My goodness, it is ObamaCare all over again. My friends across the aisle haven't read the bill. You have to read the bill to know what is in it. If you read the bill, you understand it. You see right there on page 27:

The agency shall adopt the least costly rule considered during the rule making ..... that meets relevant statutory objectives.

Take away a few key words and what does that say?

The agency shall adopt the ..... rule ..... that meets ..... statutory objectives.

So the rules will still be made and statutory goals will still be met, but they will be done in a cost-effective way that makes sure that all of the necessary cost-saving measures and all of the necessary considerations are taken into account before imposing new burdens on the American people.

[Time: 17:15]

Vote against this motion to recommit. Vote for this good, job-creating, dollar-saving bill for the American people.

Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.