4:59 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on S. 178, currently under consideration.

4:59 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on S. 178, currently under consideration.

5:00 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on S. 178, currently under consideration.

5:00 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

We are here today to consider comprehensive legislation that will help address the scourge of human trafficking, generally, and child sex trafficking, specifically, that is occurring in every corner of the United States as we stand here today.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sex trafficking is the fastest growing business of organized crime and the third largest criminal enterprise in the world. One organization estimates that child sex trafficking in the United States alone is a $9.8 billion industry.

Criminal organizations, including some of the most violent criminal street gangs like MS-13, have realized that selling children can be more profitable than selling drugs. This is because drugs are only sold once, but minor children can be and are prostituted multiple times a day, every day. It is time for Congress to send a clear message that we won't stand for this.

Today marks the third time that I have stood on the House floor urging the passage of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act. The House passed similar legislation in May 2014 and, again, in January of this year.

S. 178, the bill we consider today and its predecessors, are comprehensive legislation that, among other things, provide additional resources to law enforcement and service providers through a victim-centered grant program, help to facilitate investigations by providing that child sex trafficking and other similar crimes are predicate offenses for State wiretap applications, address the demand side by clarifying that it is a Federal crime to solicit or patronize child prostitutes or adult victims

forced into prostitution, and strengthens the existing Federal criminal laws against trafficking through a number of clarifying amendments.

I am very pleased that a number of separate trafficking vehicles that were originally passed by the House Judiciary Committee and then by the full House are contained within S. 178, including the Stop Exploitation Through Trafficking Act of 2015, introduced by Mr. Paulsen of Minnesota; the SAVE Act of 2015, introduced by Mrs. Wagner of Missouri; and the Human Trafficking Prevention, Intervention, and Recovery Act of 2015, introduced by Mrs. Noem of South Dakota. I thank

all of my colleagues for their dedication to ending this terrible crime.

I also thank Judge Poe of Texas for sponsoring the two previous House versions of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act.

S. 178 is not perfect legislation, and I thank both House and Senate leadership, as well as the bill's sponsor, Senator Cornyn, for agreeing to fix technical issues with the bill in future legislation, but it is my belief that this legislation will do much good in the fight to end human trafficking.

For that reason, I urge my colleagues to support the bill and thus send it to the President to be signed into law.

I reserve the balance of my time.

5:00 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

We are here today to consider comprehensive legislation that will help address the scourge of human trafficking, generally, and child sex trafficking, specifically, that is occurring in every corner of the United States as we stand here today.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sex trafficking is the fastest growing business of organized crime and the third largest criminal enterprise in the world. One organization estimates that child sex trafficking in the United States alone is a $9.8 billion industry.

Criminal organizations, including some of the most violent criminal street gangs like MS-13, have realized that selling children can be more profitable than selling drugs. This is because drugs are only sold once, but minor children can be and are prostituted multiple times a day, every day. It is time for Congress to send a clear message that we won't stand for this.

Today marks the third time that I have stood on the House floor urging the passage of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act. The House passed similar legislation in May 2014 and, again, in January of this year.

S. 178, the bill we consider today and its predecessors, are comprehensive legislation that, among other things, provide additional resources to law enforcement and service providers through a victim-centered grant program, help to facilitate investigations by providing that child sex trafficking and other similar crimes are predicate offenses for State wiretap applications, address the demand side by clarifying that it is a Federal crime to solicit or patronize child prostitutes or adult victims

forced into prostitution, and strengthens the existing Federal criminal laws against trafficking through a number of clarifying amendments.

I am very pleased that a number of separate trafficking vehicles that were originally passed by the House Judiciary Committee and then by the full House are contained within S. 178, including the Stop Exploitation Through Trafficking Act of 2015, introduced by Mr. Paulsen of Minnesota; the SAVE Act of 2015, introduced by Mrs. Wagner of Missouri; and the Human Trafficking Prevention, Intervention, and Recovery Act of 2015, introduced by Mrs. Noem of South Dakota. I thank

all of my colleagues for their dedication to ending this terrible crime.

I also thank Judge Poe of Texas for sponsoring the two previous House versions of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act.

S. 178 is not perfect legislation, and I thank both House and Senate leadership, as well as the bill's sponsor, Senator Cornyn, for agreeing to fix technical issues with the bill in future legislation, but it is my belief that this legislation will do much good in the fight to end human trafficking.

For that reason, I urge my colleagues to support the bill and thus send it to the President to be signed into law.

I reserve the balance of my time.

5:00 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

We are here today to consider comprehensive legislation that will help address the scourge of human trafficking, generally, and child sex trafficking, specifically, that is occurring in every corner of the United States as we stand here today.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sex trafficking is the fastest growing business of organized crime and the third largest criminal enterprise in the world. One organization estimates that child sex trafficking in the United States alone is a $9.8 billion industry.

Criminal organizations, including some of the most violent criminal street gangs like MS-13, have realized that selling children can be more profitable than selling drugs. This is because drugs are only sold once, but minor children can be and are prostituted multiple times a day, every day. It is time for Congress to send a clear message that we won't stand for this.

Today marks the third time that I have stood on the House floor urging the passage of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act. The House passed similar legislation in May 2014 and, again, in January of this year.

S. 178, the bill we consider today and its predecessors, are comprehensive legislation that, among other things, provide additional resources to law enforcement and service providers through a victim-centered grant program, help to facilitate investigations by providing that child sex trafficking and other similar crimes are predicate offenses for State wiretap applications, address the demand side by clarifying that it is a Federal crime to solicit or patronize child prostitutes or adult victims

forced into prostitution, and strengthens the existing Federal criminal laws against trafficking through a number of clarifying amendments.

I am very pleased that a number of separate trafficking vehicles that were originally passed by the House Judiciary Committee and then by the full House are contained within S. 178, including the Stop Exploitation Through Trafficking Act of 2015, introduced by Mr. Paulsen of Minnesota; the SAVE Act of 2015, introduced by Mrs. Wagner of Missouri; and the Human Trafficking Prevention, Intervention, and Recovery Act of 2015, introduced by Mrs. Noem of South Dakota. I thank

all of my colleagues for their dedication to ending this terrible crime.

I also thank Judge Poe of Texas for sponsoring the two previous House versions of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act.

S. 178 is not perfect legislation, and I thank both House and Senate leadership, as well as the bill's sponsor, Senator Cornyn, for agreeing to fix technical issues with the bill in future legislation, but it is my belief that this legislation will do much good in the fight to end human trafficking.

For that reason, I urge my colleagues to support the bill and thus send it to the President to be signed into law.

I reserve the balance of my time.

5:00 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

We are here today to consider comprehensive legislation that will help address the scourge of human trafficking, generally, and child sex trafficking, specifically, that is occurring in every corner of the United States as we stand here today.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sex trafficking is the fastest growing business of organized crime and the third largest criminal enterprise in the world. One organization estimates that child sex trafficking in the United States alone is a $9.8 billion industry.

Criminal organizations, including some of the most violent criminal street gangs like MS-13, have realized that selling children can be more profitable than selling drugs. This is because drugs are only sold once, but minor children can be and are prostituted multiple times a day, every day. It is time for Congress to send a clear message that we won't stand for this.

Today marks the third time that I have stood on the House floor urging the passage of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act. The House passed similar legislation in May 2014 and, again, in January of this year.

S. 178, the bill we consider today and its predecessors, are comprehensive legislation that, among other things, provide additional resources to law enforcement and service providers through a victim-centered grant program, help to facilitate investigations by providing that child sex trafficking and other similar crimes are predicate offenses for State wiretap applications, address the demand side by clarifying that it is a Federal crime to solicit or patronize child prostitutes or adult victims

forced into prostitution, and strengthens the existing Federal criminal laws against trafficking through a number of clarifying amendments.

I am very pleased that a number of separate trafficking vehicles that were originally passed by the House Judiciary Committee and then by the full House are contained within S. 178, including the Stop Exploitation Through Trafficking Act of 2015, introduced by Mr. Paulsen of Minnesota; the SAVE Act of 2015, introduced by Mrs. Wagner of Missouri; and the Human Trafficking Prevention, Intervention, and Recovery Act of 2015, introduced by Mrs. Noem of South Dakota. I thank

all of my colleagues for their dedication to ending this terrible crime.

I also thank Judge Poe of Texas for sponsoring the two previous House versions of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act.

S. 178 is not perfect legislation, and I thank both House and Senate leadership, as well as the bill's sponsor, Senator Cornyn, for agreeing to fix technical issues with the bill in future legislation, but it is my belief that this legislation will do much good in the fight to end human trafficking.

For that reason, I urge my colleagues to support the bill and thus send it to the President to be signed into law.

I reserve the balance of my time.

5:03 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Let me join my friend and colleague, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, and thank him for his leadership in making sure that this bill would come to the floor. Along with the ranking member, Mr. Conyers; subcommittee chairman, Mr. Sensenbrenner; and myself as the ranking member, we are grateful for the leadership of our colleagues in working through the human trafficking legislation.

I would associate myself with the words that all of us have said very often. Tragically and heinously, sex trafficking, human trafficking, and the trafficking of children keeps on giving in an ugly, horrible, disastrous way that ruins the lives of innocent victims for they are used over and over again.

I stand here recognizing that Houston ranks very high among those cities that have the scourge of human trafficking. In fact, as I rise to support S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015, I recognize that human trafficking is a scourge that impacts greatly on my home district in Houston, Texas. Houston currently ranks number one among the U.S. cities with the most victims of human trafficking.

On the House bill, I congratulate Congressman Poe, my neighbor in Houston, and Carolyn Maloney, a member from New York, who worked together to bring about this bipartisan legislation.

I want to thank my colleagues as well from the Homeland Security Committee. Judge Poe joined us in the first human trafficking hearing that I held in Houston, Texas, to further emphasize the coming together of law enforcement and social service advocates for the importance of this legislation.

In fact, as I recall this bill being written, there were so many different groups from faith organizations putting on walks to talk about trafficking. Houston recognized that they had a problem they need to fix.

In the backdrop of this legislation, as it was making its way through the House, we even had a massive human trafficking raid, if you will, where there were 20 to 30 persons in a home just a short distance from downtown. A couple of the individuals were minors. We know what their end would be.

Twenty-five percent of all human trafficking victims are in my home State of Texas. Currently, 30 percent of

all human trafficking tips to the national rescue hotline come from Texas; but this is a national problem. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children estimates that one of every seven endangered runaways reported to the center are likely victims of minor sex trafficking and that at least 100,000 American children are victims of sex trafficking each year.

It is our duty to rescue these children, shelter them, and help them recover from the trauma that has been inflicted upon them. It is also our duty to prevent those crimes before they happen and to provide law enforcement with the tools they need to combat human traffickers.

This bill will be a significant weapon in the war against sex trafficking which, unfortunately, is the fastest growing business of organized crime in the United States, generating an estimated $9 billion annually. Mr. Speaker, we have said it continues to generate income and revenue.

I am very glad that there are a number of legislative initiatives incorporated into this final legislative document and that this will go to the President's desk and be signed.

I am glad it includes language I submitted in the Judiciary Committee that puts Congress squarely on the record in the sense of Congress, that we stand together on the issue of opposing human trafficking and viewing it as a dastardly deed.

Although not perfect, this is a comprehensive bill that includes a variety of measures intended to strike at the problem of child sex trafficking through prevention, law enforcement, and rehabilitation services for victims.

What I like most of all is that it puts the United States Congress and, ultimately, the President of the United States and the laws of the land on the side of children and on the side of victims who have been trafficked or victims of sex trafficking. The bill strikes at the demand for this business by adding criminal prohibitions for those who solicit and advertise human trafficking.

Law enforcement across the U.S. has identified online sex acts as the number one platform for buying and selling of sex with children and young women. [Page: H3278]

These men can sit idly and relaxed in their homes and victimize individuals. This is an important step forward for law enforcement, to have the tools to reach those predators wherever they are.

This legislation provides the tools to rebuild the lives of those exploited by this business, and it specifically addresses the needs of thousands of homeless children, many of whom are on the streets of Houston. I say to them today that they will be embraced with a document that stands on their side, many who have fled physically and sexually abusive homes, only to be victimized again by sex traffickers.

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted that this bill is moving, and I reserve the balance of my time.

5:03 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Let me join my friend and colleague, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, and thank him for his leadership in making sure that this bill would come to the floor. Along with the ranking member, Mr. Conyers; subcommittee chairman, Mr. Sensenbrenner; and myself as the ranking member, we are grateful for the leadership of our colleagues in working through the human trafficking legislation.

I would associate myself with the words that all of us have said very often. Tragically and heinously, sex trafficking, human trafficking, and the trafficking of children keeps on giving in an ugly, horrible, disastrous way that ruins the lives of innocent victims for they are used over and over again.

I stand here recognizing that Houston ranks very high among those cities that have the scourge of human trafficking. In fact, as I rise to support S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015, I recognize that human trafficking is a scourge that impacts greatly on my home district in Houston, Texas. Houston currently ranks number one among the U.S. cities with the most victims of human trafficking.

On the House bill, I congratulate Congressman Poe, my neighbor in Houston, and Carolyn Maloney, a member from New York, who worked together to bring about this bipartisan legislation.

I want to thank my colleagues as well from the Homeland Security Committee. Judge Poe joined us in the first human trafficking hearing that I held in Houston, Texas, to further emphasize the coming together of law enforcement and social service advocates for the importance of this legislation.

In fact, as I recall this bill being written, there were so many different groups from faith organizations putting on walks to talk about trafficking. Houston recognized that they had a problem they need to fix.

In the backdrop of this legislation, as it was making its way through the House, we even had a massive human trafficking raid, if you will, where there were 20 to 30 persons in a home just a short distance from downtown. A couple of the individuals were minors. We know what their end would be.

Twenty-five percent of all human trafficking victims are in my home State of Texas. Currently, 30 percent of

all human trafficking tips to the national rescue hotline come from Texas; but this is a national problem. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children estimates that one of every seven endangered runaways reported to the center are likely victims of minor sex trafficking and that at least 100,000 American children are victims of sex trafficking each year.

It is our duty to rescue these children, shelter them, and help them recover from the trauma that has been inflicted upon them. It is also our duty to prevent those crimes before they happen and to provide law enforcement with the tools they need to combat human traffickers.

This bill will be a significant weapon in the war against sex trafficking which, unfortunately, is the fastest growing business of organized crime in the United States, generating an estimated $9 billion annually. Mr. Speaker, we have said it continues to generate income and revenue.

I am very glad that there are a number of legislative initiatives incorporated into this final legislative document and that this will go to the President's desk and be signed.

I am glad it includes language I submitted in the Judiciary Committee that puts Congress squarely on the record in the sense of Congress, that we stand together on the issue of opposing human trafficking and viewing it as a dastardly deed.

Although not perfect, this is a comprehensive bill that includes a variety of measures intended to strike at the problem of child sex trafficking through prevention, law enforcement, and rehabilitation services for victims.

What I like most of all is that it puts the United States Congress and, ultimately, the President of the United States and the laws of the land on the side of children and on the side of victims who have been trafficked or victims of sex trafficking. The bill strikes at the demand for this business by adding criminal prohibitions for those who solicit and advertise human trafficking.

Law enforcement across the U.S. has identified online sex acts as the number one platform for buying and selling of sex with children and young women. [Page: H3278]

These men can sit idly and relaxed in their homes and victimize individuals. This is an important step forward for law enforcement, to have the tools to reach those predators wherever they are.

This legislation provides the tools to rebuild the lives of those exploited by this business, and it specifically addresses the needs of thousands of homeless children, many of whom are on the streets of Houston. I say to them today that they will be embraced with a document that stands on their side, many who have fled physically and sexually abusive homes, only to be victimized again by sex traffickers.

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted that this bill is moving, and I reserve the balance of my time.

5:03 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Let me join my friend and colleague, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, and thank him for his leadership in making sure that this bill would come to the floor. Along with the ranking member, Mr. Conyers; subcommittee chairman, Mr. Sensenbrenner; and myself as the ranking member, we are grateful for the leadership of our colleagues in working through the human trafficking legislation.

I would associate myself with the words that all of us have said very often. Tragically and heinously, sex trafficking, human trafficking, and the trafficking of children keeps on giving in an ugly, horrible, disastrous way that ruins the lives of innocent victims for they are used over and over again.

I stand here recognizing that Houston ranks very high among those cities that have the scourge of human trafficking. In fact, as I rise to support S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015, I recognize that human trafficking is a scourge that impacts greatly on my home district in Houston, Texas. Houston currently ranks number one among the U.S. cities with the most victims of human trafficking.

On the House bill, I congratulate Congressman Poe, my neighbor in Houston, and Carolyn Maloney, a member from New York, who worked together to bring about this bipartisan legislation.

I want to thank my colleagues as well from the Homeland Security Committee. Judge Poe joined us in the first human trafficking hearing that I held in Houston, Texas, to further emphasize the coming together of law enforcement and social service advocates for the importance of this legislation.

In fact, as I recall this bill being written, there were so many different groups from faith organizations putting on walks to talk about trafficking. Houston recognized that they had a problem they need to fix.

In the backdrop of this legislation, as it was making its way through the House, we even had a massive human trafficking raid, if you will, where there were 20 to 30 persons in a home just a short distance from downtown. A couple of the individuals were minors. We know what their end would be.

Twenty-five percent of all human trafficking victims are in my home State of Texas. Currently, 30 percent of

all human trafficking tips to the national rescue hotline come from Texas; but this is a national problem. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children estimates that one of every seven endangered runaways reported to the center are likely victims of minor sex trafficking and that at least 100,000 American children are victims of sex trafficking each year.

It is our duty to rescue these children, shelter them, and help them recover from the trauma that has been inflicted upon them. It is also our duty to prevent those crimes before they happen and to provide law enforcement with the tools they need to combat human traffickers.

This bill will be a significant weapon in the war against sex trafficking which, unfortunately, is the fastest growing business of organized crime in the United States, generating an estimated $9 billion annually. Mr. Speaker, we have said it continues to generate income and revenue.

I am very glad that there are a number of legislative initiatives incorporated into this final legislative document and that this will go to the President's desk and be signed.

I am glad it includes language I submitted in the Judiciary Committee that puts Congress squarely on the record in the sense of Congress, that we stand together on the issue of opposing human trafficking and viewing it as a dastardly deed.

Although not perfect, this is a comprehensive bill that includes a variety of measures intended to strike at the problem of child sex trafficking through prevention, law enforcement, and rehabilitation services for victims.

What I like most of all is that it puts the United States Congress and, ultimately, the President of the United States and the laws of the land on the side of children and on the side of victims who have been trafficked or victims of sex trafficking. The bill strikes at the demand for this business by adding criminal prohibitions for those who solicit and advertise human trafficking.

Law enforcement across the U.S. has identified online sex acts as the number one platform for buying and selling of sex with children and young women. [Page: H3278]

These men can sit idly and relaxed in their homes and victimize individuals. This is an important step forward for law enforcement, to have the tools to reach those predators wherever they are.

This legislation provides the tools to rebuild the lives of those exploited by this business, and it specifically addresses the needs of thousands of homeless children, many of whom are on the streets of Houston. I say to them today that they will be embraced with a document that stands on their side, many who have fled physically and sexually abusive homes, only to be victimized again by sex traffickers.

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted that this bill is moving, and I reserve the balance of my time.

5:09 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, at this time, it is my pleasure to yield 5 minutes to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe), a member of the Judiciary Committee and a champion in the fight against child sex trafficking and the author of one of the underlying pieces of legislation that led to the bill that we are considering here today.

5:09 PM EDT

Bob Goodlatte, R-VA 6th

Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, at this time, it is my pleasure to yield 5 minutes to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe), a member of the Judiciary Committee and a champion in the fight against child sex trafficking and the author of one of the underlying pieces of legislation that led to the bill that we are considering here today.

5:09 PM EDT

Ted Poe, R-TX 2nd

Mr. POE of Texas. I thank the chairman for bringing this legislation promptly to the House floor today.

Mr. Speaker, it was 155 years ago that this Nation debated in this Chamber several volatile issues, including slavery. After 600,000 Americans, both from the North and the South, died in war, slavery was forever banned by the 13th Amendment to our Constitution.

Now, in our time, this ugly scourge has risen its head again one more time. The evil enterprise has taken on the enslavement of women and children. Traffickers--slave masters--buy and sell the young in the marketplace of child sex exploitation.

They treat these victims as cattle to be led to the stockyards of slavery. The traffickers even brand the victims, Mr. Speaker, on the neck so that other traffickers will know whose property they are.

The illicit revenue from trafficking is second only to the drug trade; and, as has been mentioned, my hometown of Houston seems to be the hub for child sex trafficking in United States.

The average age of the minor sex traffic victim, Mr. Speaker, is 13. Maria was an 11-year-old girl. She met a person that treated her nicely. He was an older male. Traffickers, Mr. Speaker, do not wear long trench coats. They are relatively young, good-looking guys.

He enticed her; he brought her some presents; he took her to his home, and then she became a slave. At 11 years old, she was sold on the marketplace for a long time, until she was able to escape the traffickers. That is what is taking place in our country.

Today, unlike 155 years ago, this Congress is united in stopping this curse of slavery. Ten bills dealing with sex trafficking overwhelmingly passed the House of Representatives. One of those was one that I sponsored, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act, along with Carolyn Maloney, who is here today.

Mr. Speaker, these are all bipartisan pieces of legislation, and you don't get much more bipartisan than Carolyn Maloney from New York and Ted Poe from Texas agreeing. We are only separated, as Churchill said, by a common language. I want to thank her for her hard work for years on the issue of trafficking. The Senate combined these 10 bills, made some positive changes, and their bill passed the Senate 99-0.

The Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act goes after the trafficker--the slave master, the slaveholder. It treats the child as a victim and not as a criminal and not as a child prostitute. It rescues the

victim, and it targets the demand--the buyer, the child abuser--that buys these children for pleasure.

This legislation also allows Federal judges to impose not only prison for these criminals, but may order that fees go into a fund. That fund can be used for victims' services and even training for peace officers. Make these criminals pay the rent on the courthouse and pay for the system that they have created.

I want to thank all those that have been involved in these numerous issues. I especially want to thank the ladies of the House of Representatives on both sides for bringing this issue to a vote today. They are very powerful, Mr. Speaker, on this issue. They deserve recognition.

I also want to commend Senator Cornyn for the legislation he pushed forward--the original bill that we are voting on today--in the Senate of the United States.

Mr. Speaker, America can no longer deny the inconvenient truth of sex trafficking. The enslavement of children is not acceptable, and it will not be tolerated. It will not be tolerated in this country, and it is not going to be tolerated in other countries as well.

Mr. Speaker, I will insert into the Record a letter sent by 163 different organizations in support of this legislation.

April 29, 2015.

Hon. JOHN BOEHNER,

Speaker, House of Representatives,

Washington, DC.

Hon. NANCY PELOSI,

Minority Leader, House of Representatives,

Washington, DC.

DEAR SPEAKER BOEHNER AND MINORITY LEADER PELOSI: We are an alliance of organizations and individual advocates from across the United States dedicated to improving the lives of vulnerable women and children. We write to express our support for the Senate anti-trafficking package, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act, as amended, S. 178 (JVTA package) recently voted out of the Senate unanimously. This package, which includes nearly all of the trafficking bills passed overwhelmingly

by the House in January, would provide much needed services to victims of human trafficking and help ensure that child victims ensnared in the sex trade are no longer arrested and treated as criminals.

According to the FBI, over 80 percent of all confirmed sex trafficking cases in the U.S. involve U.S. citizens, yet across the country, victims still lack basic necessities. Simply stated, there are more animal shelters in our country than programs or beds for victims of trafficking. This critical legislation provides unprecedented support to victims, who for too long have endured arrest, imprisonment, and stigma for their victimization instead of support and services. The Senate package contains

critical funding for housing and services--a crucial element the House companion lacks. Moreover, the legislation supports training for federal prosecutors and judges on the importance of requesting and ordering restitution, so that victims can receive the compensation they are rightly owed by law.

Every day in this country, thousands of women and children are bought and sold. The unfettered demand for sex has caused pimps and exploiters to resort to more extreme tactics in order to meet exploding demand. The JVTA package directs the Department of Justice to incorporate strategies for reducing demand into anti-trafficking training programs and sting operations, including Innocence Lost. Women and children, especially girls, are advertised online where buyers purchase them with ease and

anonymity. This happens in every city, in every state. The JVTA package would help fight online exploitation and work to bring buyers of child sex to justice. It creates a new partnership with wounded warriors, training them to serve as online investigators of child pornography and exploitation.

Advocates know: this is the most comprehensive and thoughtful piece of anti-trafficking legislation in years. The JVTA package represents a tremendous bipartisan effort to provide necessary support and protections for our victims of human trafficking, and at long last ends the culture of impunity for those who purchase our most vulnerable for sex. But these victims have waited too long. After several years of advocacy and over a month of delay on the Senate side, we are just one step away from

providing this population with justice and healing.

As leaders in the anti-trafficking, anti-violence, faith-based, child welfare, law enforcement, and human rights movements, we urge the House to take up and pass this vital legislation without delay.

Sincerely,

Human Rights Project for Girls (Rights4Girls); National Domestic Violence Hotline; Coalition Against Trafficking in Women (CATW); Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN); ECPAT-USA; Girls Inc.; Shared Hope International; Equality Now; National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ); National Association of Police Organizations (NAPO); National Alliance to End Sexual Violence; New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault; Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Services;

Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault; Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence; Florida Council Against Sexual Violence; New Hampshire Coalition Against Domestic & Sexual Violence; Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence.

Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault; Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services; National Children's Alliance (NCA); Jewish Women International (JWI); Children's Advocacy Institute; National Association of Counsel for Children; Courtney's House, survivor-led service provider; PROTECT; First Focus Campaign for Children; Franciscan Action Network; Breaking Free, survivor-led service provider; The Organization for Prostitution Survivors; Religious Sisters of Charity; Sanctuary for Families;

Maryknoll Sisters of St. Dominic. [Page: H3279]

Dominican Sisters of Peace; DC Rape Crisis Center; Congregation of St. Joseph; Religious of the Sacred Heart; Survivors for Solutions, survivor-led service provider; YouthSpark; Poverty Elimination and Community Action (PEACE) Foundation; Providence House Inc.; Freedom From Exploitation; Society of the Holy Child Jesus, American Province; Sisters of Mercy; Second Life of Chattanooga; Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest; Advocacy for Justice and Peace Committee of the Sisters of St. Francis of

Philadelphia; Naomi Project; YWCA National Capital Area; U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

National Center for Youth Law (NYCL); Christ United Methodist Church; ENC Stop Human Trafficking; Sisters of St. Joseph CA; W. Haywood Burns Institute; Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary; School Sisters of Notre Dame--CP Province Shalom--JPIC Office; WestCoast Children's Clinic; Pan Pacific and South East Asia Women's Association; Trinity Health; Ursuline Sisters of Tildonk, U.S. Province; Society for Incentive Travel Excellence (SITE).

Dominican Sisters of Hope; Wildwood United Methodist Church; Daughters of Mary and Joseph; Presbyterian Women; Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary, Western American Province; San Francisco Department on the Status of Women; Enterprising and Professional Women--NYC; MPower Mentoring; Children Now; Hollywood Business and Professional Women; Mark P. Lagon, Former Ambassador-At-Large to Combat Trafficking in Persons, U.S. Dept. of State.

Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center; Perhaps Kids Meeting Kids Can Make A Difference; California Federation Business & Professional Women; Virginia Beach Justice Initiative; Sex Trafficking Survivors United; Burning Bush Moments; Sara Kruzan, Survivor Advocate; Mary David, Survivor Advocate; Mentari, New York-based trafficking provider; MISSSEY Inc.; WITNESS; World Outreach Worship Center; Citizens Against Trafficking; Culture Reframed; Parenting Project.

Human Trafficking Awareness; Sisters of Charity of St. Elizabeth; Samaritan House; Regent Law Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law; The Advisory Council on Child Trafficking; Center for Global Justice; Slavery Today; The Salvation Army 614 Corps; Regent Law Center for Global Justice; Dare for More; Sisters of St. Joseph NW PA; The Samaritan Women; Worthwhile: Go; CHI Memorial Community Health Center; Hamilton County Health Department.

City Church of Chattanooga; The Healing Place of Hampton Roads; Lee University; Hope Hollow Exploitation Victim Assistance and Consultation Services; Task Force Against Human Trafficking for the Episcopal Diocese of New York; Protect HER; Mary Kay Cosmetics; Community Coalition Against Human Trafficking; Chattanooga Women's Club; Brainerd Baptist Church; Young America Ministries.

Lions Club; United Methodist Women; Duoloyi Ministry; Hamilton County Health Department; Gateway Christian Center; Sisters of Charity; OLP Foundation; The Advocates for Human Rights; Burks United Methodist Church; Sisters of Providence; Congregation of Sisters of St. Agnes; Chattanooga Coalition Against Human Trafficking; Regent University Center for Global Justice; Episcopal Diocese of New York.

Jewish Child Care Association; All Saints Institute for Asian American Concerns; Therapeutic Interventions, Inc.; Church of the Incarnation; Lutheran Family Services of Virginia; Center for Global Justice at Regent Law; Children's Law Center of California; Seraphim Global; Christina Oaks; Chattanooga State Community College; Savior Arts, Inc.; Church of the Holy Comforter; Sex Trade 101; Project Woman, Ohio-based domestic violence and sexual assault center.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice; The Up Center; Foster Family-based Treatment Association; Alternatives to Violence Center; Tri County Help Center, Inc.; Alameda County Foster Youth Alliance; Business and Professional Women (BPW); Amara Legal Center; All Saints Episcopal Church; University of Hawai'i at Ma 8noa; Advancing the Ministries of the Gospel (AMG) International; Sisters of Charity of St. Elizabeth; St. Paul's Episcopal Church.

New York Presbyterian Church; First Centenary United Methodist Church; West Virginia Foundation for Rape Information and Services; Rape Crisis Team Trumbull County; Cleveland Rape Crisis Center; Poverty Elimination and Community Education (PEACE) Foundation; SHEBA USA; Hope Tree Family Services.

5:14 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, it gives me great privilege to yield 5 minutes to the distinguished gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. Carolyn B. Maloney), whom I have worked with over the years on issues dealing with women's rights and the abuse and misuse of children and certainly her work on the issues of sexual abuse and sex trafficking of children and women.

Congresswoman Maloney is a member of the Financial Services Committee and an original cosponsor, along with Congressman Poe, of this legislation in the House.

[Time: 17:15]

5:14 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, it gives me great privilege to yield 5 minutes to the distinguished gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. Carolyn B. Maloney), whom I have worked with over the years on issues dealing with women's rights and the abuse and misuse of children and certainly her work on the issues of sexual abuse and sex trafficking of children and women.

Congresswoman Maloney is a member of the Financial Services Committee and an original cosponsor, along with Congressman Poe, of this legislation in the House.

[Time: 17:15]

5:14 PM EDT

Carolyn Maloney, D-NY 12th

Mrs. CAROLYN B. MALONEY of New York. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of the Senate-passed Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act.

I commend the ranking member for the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations for her hard work on this bill and so many others and on this issue, and to Chairman Goodlatte and the leadership for bringing this bill swiftly to the floor.

I particularly applaud the efforts of Congressman Poe, who, as a former judge and prosecutor, brought a keen understanding and passion to moving this bill forward. For well over 10 years, I have worked on trying to pass legislation that focused on the demand side of sex trafficking. It is only by going after the demand side that you will ever make a dent in protecting these young girls and boys. With his leadership, he brought new life and focus to getting this passed, and I cannot thank

him enough. I truly believe that this bill will save lives.

I am so pleased that Democrats and Republicans have come together, as we have historically done, in efforts to combat human slavery, human trafficking, and to bring forward a bill to help victims of this modern-day form of slavery.

This bill cracks down on traffickers and provides resources to trafficking survivors. There are an estimated 21 million victims around the world today, including in all 50 States, being sold for sex and slave labor.

Business is very good for some very bad people. Every year, sex trafficking yields well over $9 billion in illegal profits. But unlike guns and dope that can only be sold once, the human body can be sold over and over again, usually until they die. This legislation starts to put a dent in those profits by levying fines on convicted traffickers and using the money to create the domestic trafficking victims fund.

This is appropriate justice. Traffickers are forced to pay for rehabilitative services for the girls, boys, men, women, and children whom they have victimized and profited from.

But we have to capture these criminals first, and perpetrators too easily have slipped through the cracks. In fact, trafficking victims are commonly charged with prostitution, while their pimps and johns and traffickers are never held accountable for their terrible crimes.

This bill will flip that equation by giving law enforcement tools to help victims, and new powers and resources to identify, arrest, and prosecute buyers and sellers of sex with minor children, pornography, slave labor, and other forms of sex and labor trafficking. This will clarify, once and for all, that traffickers and johns and pimps are the true criminals in sex trafficking because, make no mistake, prostitution is not, and never has been, what has often been called a victimless crime.

Patronizing a trafficked individual is not a casual act of sex; it is a criminal act of rape. Stiffening penalties and levying fines on perpetrators of these terrible crimes can start to decrease demand and put the people who buy and sell children behind bars, protecting other children from being hurt and destroyed--put them behind bars, where they belong.

This bill also enables victims and survivors to get the help that they deserve. Most trafficked individuals have multiple encounters with law enforcement while enslaved, but police are not sufficiently equipped to identify them. To that end, the bill also provides support for law enforcement to better identify and serve trafficking victims. These are victims who need help, not culprits to lock up while their traffickers and pimps go free.

We cannot afford to miss opportunities to recognize a trafficked victim when he or she walks into the police station or hospital or local clinic. And there must be protocols, such as those called for in this bill, in place to ensure their safety and not to treat them as the criminals.

This bill provides a comprehensive approach to address these issues and to banish this horrific crime from the United States of America. I urge Congress to act right away so victims need wait no longer for justice and the critical services and resources that they so desperately deserve. I urge complete [Page: H3280]

bipartisan support for this bill. It is long overdue, and it will give a better future for those who have survived the worst crime in the world.

5:15 PM EDT

Carolyn Maloney, D-NY 12th

Mrs. CAROLYN B. MALONEY of New York. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of the Senate-passed Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act.

I commend the ranking member for the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations for her hard work on this bill and so many others and on this issue, and to Chairman Goodlatte and the leadership for bringing this bill swiftly to the floor.

I particularly applaud the efforts of Congressman Poe, who, as a former judge and prosecutor, brought a keen understanding and passion to moving this bill forward. For well over 10 years, I have worked on trying to pass legislation that focused on the demand side of sex trafficking. It is only by going after the demand side that you will ever make a dent in protecting these young girls and boys. With his leadership, he brought new life and focus to getting this passed, and I cannot thank

him enough. I truly believe that this bill will save lives.

I am so pleased that Democrats and Republicans have come together, as we have historically done, in efforts to combat human slavery, human trafficking, and to bring forward a bill to help victims of this modern-day form of slavery.

This bill cracks down on traffickers and provides resources to trafficking survivors. There are an estimated 21 million victims around the world today, including in all 50 States, being sold for sex and slave labor.

Business is very good for some very bad people. Every year, sex trafficking yields well over $9 billion in illegal profits. But unlike guns and dope that can only be sold once, the human body can be sold over and over again, usually until they die. This legislation starts to put a dent in those profits by levying fines on convicted traffickers and using the money to create the domestic trafficking victims fund.

This is appropriate justice. Traffickers are forced to pay for rehabilitative services for the girls, boys, men, women, and children whom they have victimized and profited from.

But we have to capture these criminals first, and perpetrators too easily have slipped through the cracks. In fact, trafficking victims are commonly charged with prostitution, while their pimps and johns and traffickers are never held accountable for their terrible crimes.

This bill will flip that equation by giving law enforcement tools to help victims, and new powers and resources to identify, arrest, and prosecute buyers and sellers of sex with minor children, pornography, slave labor, and other forms of sex and labor trafficking. This will clarify, once and for all, that traffickers and johns and pimps are the true criminals in sex trafficking because, make no mistake, prostitution is not, and never has been, what has often been called a victimless crime.

Patronizing a trafficked individual is not a casual act of sex; it is a criminal act of rape. Stiffening penalties and levying fines on perpetrators of these terrible crimes can start to decrease demand and put the people who buy and sell children behind bars, protecting other children from being hurt and destroyed--put them behind bars, where they belong.

This bill also enables victims and survivors to get the help that they deserve. Most trafficked individuals have multiple encounters with law enforcement while enslaved, but police are not sufficiently equipped to identify them. To that end, the bill also provides support for law enforcement to better identify and serve trafficking victims. These are victims who need help, not culprits to lock up while their traffickers and pimps go free.

We cannot afford to miss opportunities to recognize a trafficked victim when he or she walks into the police station or hospital or local clinic. And there must be protocols, such as those called for in this bill, in place to ensure their safety and not to treat them as the criminals.

This bill provides a comprehensive approach to address these issues and to banish this horrific crime from the United States of America. I urge Congress to act right away so victims need wait no longer for justice and the critical services and resources that they so desperately deserve. I urge complete [Page: H3280]

bipartisan support for this bill. It is long overdue, and it will give a better future for those who have survived the worst crime in the world.

5:20 PM EDT

Carolyn Maloney, D-NY 12th

Mrs. CAROLYN B. MALONEY of New York. This bill is so critically important. Of all the bills that we have passed--and this body, in a bipartisan way, has passed a whole series of bills--this particular one has enforcement, it has prevention, and it has help for the survivors.

I applaud everyone who worked on this important piece of legislation, and we can't pass it fast enough.

5:20 PM EDT

Carolyn Maloney, D-NY 12th

Mrs. CAROLYN B. MALONEY of New York. This bill is so critically important. Of all the bills that we have passed--and this body, in a bipartisan way, has passed a whole series of bills--this particular one has enforcement, it has prevention, and it has help for the survivors.

I applaud everyone who worked on this important piece of legislation, and we can't pass it fast enough.

5:21 PM EDT

Ann Wagner, R-MO 2nd

Mrs. WAGNER. I thank the chairman very much for his leadership on this issue and so many others.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act, and all of the House-passed human trafficking legislation that was incorporated into this Senate bill.

Mr. Speaker, today marks the culmination of a long journey for myself and many Members in both Chambers who have worked on this important issue. This legislation represents a significant step forward in the Federal

Government's efforts to combat the scourge of modern-day slavery, known as human trafficking. This bill makes enormous progress in the fight against trafficking by providing resources to law enforcement officials and collecting fees from sex traffickers that go into a new fund for victims.

It also includes my signature legislation, the SAVE Act, which make it illegal to knowingly advertise the victims of human trafficking, especially on the Internet. I thank my friends and colleagues, Senator Mark Kirk and Dianne Feinstein, for offering the SAVE Act as an amendment to this very important legislation.

Beyond the multiple tools and resources it gives to law enforcement and survivors, this legislation also serves an important symbolic purpose. This bill symbolizes the longstanding and steadfast commitment that Members of Congress have towards protecting the most vulnerable members of our society.

No longer will the cruel exploitation of women and children be allowed to continue unchecked. No longer will sexual predators be allowed to torture, rape, and kill young Americans in the name of financial profit. Mr. Speaker, with this legislation, we are providing voice to the voiceless and advocating for those who cannot advocate for themselves.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud of all of the good, bipartisan work done by my colleagues here in Congress on this issue of human trafficking. Years of work by many of my colleagues, including Representatives POE, SMITH, NOEM, PAULSEN, BEATTY, MALONEY, and many, many others, Mr. Speaker, have laid the foundation for this long overdue action.

I am grateful that many of my colleagues have held events in their home districts to raise awareness and educate the public about human trafficking. Awareness, training, and education are the key to preventing this horrible crime from happening in the first place. Young people must be warned about the devious and manipulative strategies employed by traffickers to ensnare them in the trap of sexual slavery.

The children at risk are not just school students. Pimps or traffickers are known to prey on victims as young as 9 years old. Traffickers may target minor victims through social media Web sites, afterschool programs, shopping malls and clubs, and through friends or acquaintances who recruit students on school campuses.

One of the best ways to combat human trafficking is through education. Many States have successful programs that train school personnel about how to identify the victims. We should work with schools to develop policies and protocols and partnerships to address and prevent the exploitation of children.

Partnership between public and private sectors is the key to combating human trafficking. Many times, frontline employees in the transportation and hospitality industry are the ones best suited to identify trafficking victims or their predators. Increased awareness and training will lead to more victims being identified, which is the critical step in breaking the cycle of exploitation and victimization.

Mr. Speaker, I urge all my colleagues to support this legislation and all efforts to combat human trafficking, and I look forward to continuing this work in the House of Representatives, and this Congress as a whole, for years to come.

5:21 PM EDT

Ann Wagner, R-MO 2nd

Mrs. WAGNER. I thank the chairman very much for his leadership on this issue and so many others.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act, and all of the House-passed human trafficking legislation that was incorporated into this Senate bill.

Mr. Speaker, today marks the culmination of a long journey for myself and many Members in both Chambers who have worked on this important issue. This legislation represents a significant step forward in the Federal

Government's efforts to combat the scourge of modern-day slavery, known as human trafficking. This bill makes enormous progress in the fight against trafficking by providing resources to law enforcement officials and collecting fees from sex traffickers that go into a new fund for victims.

It also includes my signature legislation, the SAVE Act, which make it illegal to knowingly advertise the victims of human trafficking, especially on the Internet. I thank my friends and colleagues, Senator Mark Kirk and Dianne Feinstein, for offering the SAVE Act as an amendment to this very important legislation.

Beyond the multiple tools and resources it gives to law enforcement and survivors, this legislation also serves an important symbolic purpose. This bill symbolizes the longstanding and steadfast commitment that Members of Congress have towards protecting the most vulnerable members of our society.

No longer will the cruel exploitation of women and children be allowed to continue unchecked. No longer will sexual predators be allowed to torture, rape, and kill young Americans in the name of financial profit. Mr. Speaker, with this legislation, we are providing voice to the voiceless and advocating for those who cannot advocate for themselves.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud of all of the good, bipartisan work done by my colleagues here in Congress on this issue of human trafficking. Years of work by many of my colleagues, including Representatives POE, SMITH, NOEM, PAULSEN, BEATTY, MALONEY, and many, many others, Mr. Speaker, have laid the foundation for this long overdue action.

I am grateful that many of my colleagues have held events in their home districts to raise awareness and educate the public about human trafficking. Awareness, training, and education are the key to preventing this horrible crime from happening in the first place. Young people must be warned about the devious and manipulative strategies employed by traffickers to ensnare them in the trap of sexual slavery.

The children at risk are not just school students. Pimps or traffickers are known to prey on victims as young as 9 years old. Traffickers may target minor victims through social media Web sites, afterschool programs, shopping malls and clubs, and through friends or acquaintances who recruit students on school campuses.

One of the best ways to combat human trafficking is through education. Many States have successful programs that train school personnel about how to identify the victims. We should work with schools to develop policies and protocols and partnerships to address and prevent the exploitation of children.

Partnership between public and private sectors is the key to combating human trafficking. Many times, frontline employees in the transportation and hospitality industry are the ones best suited to identify trafficking victims or their predators. Increased awareness and training will lead to more victims being identified, which is the critical step in breaking the cycle of exploitation and victimization.

Mr. Speaker, I urge all my colleagues to support this legislation and all efforts to combat human trafficking, and I look forward to continuing this work in the House of Representatives, and this Congress as a whole, for years to come.

5:28 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:28 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:28 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:28 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:28 PM EDT

Erik Paulsen, R-MN 3rd

Mr. PAULSEN. Mr. Speaker, I want to first thank the chairman and the ranking member for their leadership on combating this issue because today is a very important moment in the fight against modern-day slavery.

For several years, members of both parties have been working diligently with law enforcement, with victims, with social service providers and policy experts to end the sale and victimization of innocent girls. This bill today is the culmination now of all the initiatives previously passed in the House that will increase penalties for pimps and johns, that will enhance the Federal Government's response to trafficking, that will increase cooperation with governments overseas, and it will go after

the Web sites that aid in the trafficking of minors.

[Time: 17:30]

I am pleased that this package also includes my legislation, the safe harbor legislation, that ensures that we will be treating minors who are trafficked as victims, rather than as criminals, and improve the services that they receive.

Mr. Speaker, the traffickers that we see today, they use every tool they can use to keep victims silent and under their control, whether it is by using threats, violence, drugs, or deception.

And trafficking victims all share one thing in common: it is a loss of freedom and a loss of the ability to speak out. Today we stand with these victims to bring them out of the shadows and say, enough is enough, because our girls are not for sale.

5:28 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:30 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:30 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:30 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. I yield myself such time as I may consume.

I thank the Members who have spoken and highlighted a number of points that I want to reinforce.

I want to reinforce what my good friend from New York (Mrs. Carolyn B. Maloney) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe) have said: that we are now looking the pimps and the johns straight in the eye and really focusing on demand. But connected to demand are those lives, those lives that we want to restore and give them a new opportunity in life. We want them to not be bruised. We want them to have the ability to restore their lives as young as under 10, 11, or 12, teenagers or

young women.

This particular legislation, which I want to highlight, promotes rehabilitation by encouraging the development of specialized court programs for victims of child human trafficking.

As the chair of the Children's Caucus, I realize how vulnerable our children are all over the world. And what I am most interested in is the outpatient treatment, life skills training, housing placement, vocational training, education, family support services, and job placement.

When you find a homeless teen or one who has been victimized, they are empty. They are without any substance to know that they have something of quality to save and to mold and to build. The rehabilitation part of this particular legislation--and I do want to acknowledge the gentleman from Texas, Senator Cornyn--is a very, very important part of this legislation.

With that, I reserve the balance of my time.

5:30 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. I yield myself such time as I may consume.

I thank the Members who have spoken and highlighted a number of points that I want to reinforce.

I want to reinforce what my good friend from New York (Mrs. Carolyn B. Maloney) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe) have said: that we are now looking the pimps and the johns straight in the eye and really focusing on demand. But connected to demand are those lives, those lives that we want to restore and give them a new opportunity in life. We want them to not be bruised. We want them to have the ability to restore their lives as young as under 10, 11, or 12, teenagers or

young women.

This particular legislation, which I want to highlight, promotes rehabilitation by encouraging the development of specialized court programs for victims of child human trafficking.

As the chair of the Children's Caucus, I realize how vulnerable our children are all over the world. And what I am most interested in is the outpatient treatment, life skills training, housing placement, vocational training, education, family support services, and job placement.

When you find a homeless teen or one who has been victimized, they are empty. They are without any substance to know that they have something of quality to save and to mold and to build. The rehabilitation part of this particular legislation--and I do want to acknowledge the gentleman from Texas, Senator Cornyn--is a very, very important part of this legislation.

With that, I reserve the balance of my time.

5:30 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. I yield myself such time as I may consume.

I thank the Members who have spoken and highlighted a number of points that I want to reinforce.

I want to reinforce what my good friend from New York (Mrs. Carolyn B. Maloney) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe) have said: that we are now looking the pimps and the johns straight in the eye and really focusing on demand. But connected to demand are those lives, those lives that we want to restore and give them a new opportunity in life. We want them to not be bruised. We want them to have the ability to restore their lives as young as under 10, 11, or 12, teenagers or

young women.

This particular legislation, which I want to highlight, promotes rehabilitation by encouraging the development of specialized court programs for victims of child human trafficking.

As the chair of the Children's Caucus, I realize how vulnerable our children are all over the world. And what I am most interested in is the outpatient treatment, life skills training, housing placement, vocational training, education, family support services, and job placement.

When you find a homeless teen or one who has been victimized, they are empty. They are without any substance to know that they have something of quality to save and to mold and to build. The rehabilitation part of this particular legislation--and I do want to acknowledge the gentleman from Texas, Senator Cornyn--is a very, very important part of this legislation.

With that, I reserve the balance of my time.

5:31 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:32 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:32 PM EDT

Brian Babin, R-TX 36th

Mr. BABIN. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of the legislation before us to combat human trafficking.

Not only would I like to thank the gentleman from Virginia, Chairman Goodlatte, and his committee, but I would also especially like to thank our senior Senator from the State of Texas, Mr. Cornyn, for his leadership in getting this important legislation through the Senate.

This bipartisan bill will strengthen our laws against human trafficking, train law enforcement to better target criminals engaged in trafficking, and ensure that the victims of human trafficking are cared for with compassion.

These victims are taken from their homes, enslaved, treated as objects. Human trafficking is a terrible, heinous crime, and its victims are usually voiceless. Today we are their voice, and we are taking action on their behalf.

This legislation provides resources and services that help victims to be identified, rescued, and, most importantly, to begin to heal from these traumatic events. S. 178 takes steps that would serve as a model for other nations to follow in combating the inhumane crime of human trafficking.

We must do all that we can to restore dignity to its victims and bring justice to its perpetrators, and I urge all of my colleagues to join me in supporting this important legislation.

5:32 PM EDT

Brian Babin, R-TX 36th

Mr. BABIN. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of the legislation before us to combat human trafficking.

Not only would I like to thank the gentleman from Virginia, Chairman Goodlatte, and his committee, but I would also especially like to thank our senior Senator from the State of Texas, Mr. Cornyn, for his leadership in getting this important legislation through the Senate.

This bipartisan bill will strengthen our laws against human trafficking, train law enforcement to better target criminals engaged in trafficking, and ensure that the victims of human trafficking are cared for with compassion.

These victims are taken from their homes, enslaved, treated as objects. Human trafficking is a terrible, heinous crime, and its victims are usually voiceless. Today we are their voice, and we are taking action on their behalf.

This legislation provides resources and services that help victims to be identified, rescued, and, most importantly, to begin to heal from these traumatic events. S. 178 takes steps that would serve as a model for other nations to follow in combating the inhumane crime of human trafficking.

We must do all that we can to restore dignity to its victims and bring justice to its perpetrators, and I urge all of my colleagues to join me in supporting this important legislation.

5:33 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:33 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:33 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I have the privilege of now yielding 4 minutes to the distinguished gentlewoman from Ohio (Mrs. Beatty), the author of H.R. 246 that protects children from being criminalized, which is included in this bill, and I thank her for her work.

5:33 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:33 PM EDT

Joyce Beatty, D-OH 3rd

Mrs. BEATTY. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of the bipartisan Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act, S. 178.

But first I would like to thank both Chairman Goodlatte of Virginia and Ranking Member Conyers of Michigan of the Judiciary Committee for bringing this important bill to the floor for consideration. I also would like to thank the gentlewoman from Texas, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, for her leadership and for managing the bill today for the Democrats, and a special thank you to the original sponsors.

This comprehensive legislation is a major milestone in our efforts to crack down on sex trafficking and to help protect vulnerable children across America.

One of my top priorities in the 114th Congress was to pass my trafficking [Page: H3282]

bill, H.R. 246, and today's bill includes it and nine other bipartisan House bills aimed at combating the scourge of human trafficking.

I thank Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Grassley of Iowa for offering the language of my bill as an amendment during the markup of S. 178 to ensure its inclusion in this legislation.

Mr. Speaker, on March 2, 2015, I sat through the Senate Judiciary Committee markup to witness and hear the committee's discussion and vote. Today I am proud to stand on this House floor with colleagues on both sides of the aisle, advocating for this legislation that will provide child sex trafficking victims with greater restitution, justice, and resources.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is one of the fastest-growing crimes in the world. We have heard that, and it is worth repeating.

In fact, according to the United States State Department, human trafficking is the world's second-largest criminal enterprise after the illegal drug trade.

As we know, it is not just happening in faraway lands. It happens in our own backyards.

I am proud to have participated and led discussions on preventing child sex trafficking in my district. Last year, I joined a bipartisan roundtable discussion to hear firsthand stories and challenges from once child victim Theresa Flores, who is now a national spokesperson and best-selling author of ``The Slave Across the Street.''

In the United States, some 300,000 children are at risk each year for commercial sexual exploitation. In my home State of Ohio, each year, an estimated 1,100 Ohio children become victims of human trafficking, and over 3,000 more are at risk.

The average age of trafficked victims in the United States is between 12 and 13 years of age. At this early age, Mr. Speaker, children should be in middle school, making new friends, playing sports, enjoying afterschool programs, or just being children.

Mr. Speaker, these children deserve better, and today's legislation is a much-needed step in that right direction.

We know that no single system can successfully combat trafficking. Preventing, identifying, and serving victims of trafficking requires a multicoordinated approach across all levels of government as well as input and assistance from nongovernmental entities and the American people.

My provision in this bill will update Federal law to include the term ``child sex trafficking'' to reinforce that children who are trafficked should not be criminalized as prostitutes; instead, treated as victims. We need to ensure people understand that if they report an instance of child sex trafficking, law enforcement is not going to pursue the child and prosecute them as a criminal. They are victims.

5:33 PM EDT

Joyce Beatty, D-OH 3rd

Mrs. BEATTY. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of the bipartisan Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act, S. 178.

But first I would like to thank both Chairman Goodlatte of Virginia and Ranking Member Conyers of Michigan of the Judiciary Committee for bringing this important bill to the floor for consideration. I also would like to thank the gentlewoman from Texas, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, for her leadership and for managing the bill today for the Democrats, and a special thank you to the original sponsors.

This comprehensive legislation is a major milestone in our efforts to crack down on sex trafficking and to help protect vulnerable children across America.

One of my top priorities in the 114th Congress was to pass my trafficking [Page: H3282]

bill, H.R. 246, and today's bill includes it and nine other bipartisan House bills aimed at combating the scourge of human trafficking.

I thank Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Grassley of Iowa for offering the language of my bill as an amendment during the markup of S. 178 to ensure its inclusion in this legislation.

Mr. Speaker, on March 2, 2015, I sat through the Senate Judiciary Committee markup to witness and hear the committee's discussion and vote. Today I am proud to stand on this House floor with colleagues on both sides of the aisle, advocating for this legislation that will provide child sex trafficking victims with greater restitution, justice, and resources.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is one of the fastest-growing crimes in the world. We have heard that, and it is worth repeating.

In fact, according to the United States State Department, human trafficking is the world's second-largest criminal enterprise after the illegal drug trade.

As we know, it is not just happening in faraway lands. It happens in our own backyards.

I am proud to have participated and led discussions on preventing child sex trafficking in my district. Last year, I joined a bipartisan roundtable discussion to hear firsthand stories and challenges from once child victim Theresa Flores, who is now a national spokesperson and best-selling author of ``The Slave Across the Street.''

In the United States, some 300,000 children are at risk each year for commercial sexual exploitation. In my home State of Ohio, each year, an estimated 1,100 Ohio children become victims of human trafficking, and over 3,000 more are at risk.

The average age of trafficked victims in the United States is between 12 and 13 years of age. At this early age, Mr. Speaker, children should be in middle school, making new friends, playing sports, enjoying afterschool programs, or just being children.

Mr. Speaker, these children deserve better, and today's legislation is a much-needed step in that right direction.

We know that no single system can successfully combat trafficking. Preventing, identifying, and serving victims of trafficking requires a multicoordinated approach across all levels of government as well as input and assistance from nongovernmental entities and the American people.

My provision in this bill will update Federal law to include the term ``child sex trafficking'' to reinforce that children who are trafficked should not be criminalized as prostitutes; instead, treated as victims. We need to ensure people understand that if they report an instance of child sex trafficking, law enforcement is not going to pursue the child and prosecute them as a criminal. They are victims.

5:38 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:38 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:38 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:38 PM EDT

Joyce Beatty, D-OH 3rd

Mrs. BEATTY. Mr. Speaker, let me end by asking and encouraging all people, when they see something, say something.

Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues today to support this legislation so we may send it to the President's desk for signature, finally bringing justice to the tens of thousands of human trafficking victims.

5:38 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:38 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:38 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:39 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, so many important points have been made, and I would just like to quickly summarize by adding my appreciation, again, to the sponsors and to the speakers today, Congresswoman Maloney and Congresswoman Beatty, and, of course, the speakers of our friends on the other side of the aisle.

I want to emphasize something that I think should pierce our hearts, which is that children should be protected. There are several elements that I think are important to make mention of regarding these children being protected.

One, I would like to acknowledge the responsibilities of the Attorney General to create a system to monitor the issuance and enforcement of mandatory restitution. Remember, these children have been victimized over the years and really have been thrown to foster care or other agencies where moneys were not available. These restitution orders will compensate victims not only of human trafficking but also related immigration and child pornography cases. The establishment of a domestic victims fund

will also improve the conditions for our children.

We worked on a cybersecurity bill, an important part of this bill that establishes a national cyber crimes center to manage and provide data essential for this effort. It authorizes the U.S. Marshals Service to provide assistance to State, local, and other Federal law enforcement agencies. It has placed the U.S. Marshals in a very effective manner.

Let me note the fact that there are mandatory minimums. In a very small way in this bill, we will be looking at sentencing reformation and reform in the following months.

What I would say is that our children are enormously important. This is a very important bill. And I think it is very important that we move this legislation and view it as an embracing of our children and protecting of our women, standing as a country against the violence of sex trafficking and child trafficking.

Might I also say that this bill encourages and forces training for our law enforcement, something that we view as very important as we are going forward, to investigate human trafficking as well as training for those essential to our criminal justice system.

I might, as I close, indicate that we have finally come full circle to be able to stand again on the floor of the House and acknowledge that if you engage in these activities, we will find you wherever you are, and we will prosecute you. And the idea that you can hide as a pimp or a john is no more, and the idea that children are left to their own devices after they have been victimized is no more.

We look to reunite families, to strengthen families, to provide for these children, and, as my colleague has just said, not to criminalize the children but, tragically, first to restore the victims' lives.

I ask my colleagues to support the Senate bill, the underlying bill, the bill on the floor of the House. I thank the members of the Judiciary Committee of the Senate, the members of the Judiciary Committee here in the House, both the chairman and ranking member, and the members of our committee as we work through this process, and all the Members who put forward outstanding initiatives that are now a part of this legislation.

5:39 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, so many important points have been made, and I would just like to quickly summarize by adding my appreciation, again, to the sponsors and to the speakers today, Congresswoman Maloney and Congresswoman Beatty, and, of course, the speakers of our friends on the other side of the aisle.

I want to emphasize something that I think should pierce our hearts, which is that children should be protected. There are several elements that I think are important to make mention of regarding these children being protected.

One, I would like to acknowledge the responsibilities of the Attorney General to create a system to monitor the issuance and enforcement of mandatory restitution. Remember, these children have been victimized over the years and really have been thrown to foster care or other agencies where moneys were not available. These restitution orders will compensate victims not only of human trafficking but also related immigration and child pornography cases. The establishment of a domestic victims fund

will also improve the conditions for our children.

We worked on a cybersecurity bill, an important part of this bill that establishes a national cyber crimes center to manage and provide data essential for this effort. It authorizes the U.S. Marshals Service to provide assistance to State, local, and other Federal law enforcement agencies. It has placed the U.S. Marshals in a very effective manner.

Let me note the fact that there are mandatory minimums. In a very small way in this bill, we will be looking at sentencing reformation and reform in the following months.

What I would say is that our children are enormously important. This is a very important bill. And I think it is very important that we move this legislation and view it as an embracing of our children and protecting of our women, standing as a country against the violence of sex trafficking and child trafficking.

Might I also say that this bill encourages and forces training for our law enforcement, something that we view as very important as we are going forward, to investigate human trafficking as well as training for those essential to our criminal justice system.

I might, as I close, indicate that we have finally come full circle to be able to stand again on the floor of the House and acknowledge that if you engage in these activities, we will find you wherever you are, and we will prosecute you. And the idea that you can hide as a pimp or a john is no more, and the idea that children are left to their own devices after they have been victimized is no more.

We look to reunite families, to strengthen families, to provide for these children, and, as my colleague has just said, not to criminalize the children but, tragically, first to restore the victims' lives.

I ask my colleagues to support the Senate bill, the underlying bill, the bill on the floor of the House. I thank the members of the Judiciary Committee of the Senate, the members of the Judiciary Committee here in the House, both the chairman and ranking member, and the members of our committee as we work through this process, and all the Members who put forward outstanding initiatives that are now a part of this legislation.

5:39 PM EDT

Sheila Jackson Lee, D-TX 18th

Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, so many important points have been made, and I would just like to quickly summarize by adding my appreciation, again, to the sponsors and to the speakers today, Congresswoman Maloney and Congresswoman Beatty, and, of course, the speakers of our friends on the other side of the aisle.

I want to emphasize something that I think should pierce our hearts, which is that children should be protected. There are several elements that I think are important to make mention of regarding these children being protected.

One, I would like to acknowledge the responsibilities of the Attorney General to create a system to monitor the issuance and enforcement of mandatory restitution. Remember, these children have been victimized over the years and really have been thrown to foster care or other agencies where moneys were not available. These restitution orders will compensate victims not only of human trafficking but also related immigration and child pornography cases. The establishment of a domestic victims fund

will also improve the conditions for our children.

We worked on a cybersecurity bill, an important part of this bill that establishes a national cyber crimes center to manage and provide data essential for this effort. It authorizes the U.S. Marshals Service to provide assistance to State, local, and other Federal law enforcement agencies. It has placed the U.S. Marshals in a very effective manner.

Let me note the fact that there are mandatory minimums. In a very small way in this bill, we will be looking at sentencing reformation and reform in the following months.

What I would say is that our children are enormously important. This is a very important bill. And I think it is very important that we move this legislation and view it as an embracing of our children and protecting of our women, standing as a country against the violence of sex trafficking and child trafficking.

Might I also say that this bill encourages and forces training for our law enforcement, something that we view as very important as we are going forward, to investigate human trafficking as well as training for those essential to our criminal justice system.

I might, as I close, indicate that we have finally come full circle to be able to stand again on the floor of the House and acknowledge that if you engage in these activities, we will find you wherever you are, and we will prosecute you. And the idea that you can hide as a pimp or a john is no more, and the idea that children are left to their own devices after they have been victimized is no more.

We look to reunite families, to strengthen families, to provide for these children, and, as my colleague has just said, not to criminalize the children but, tragically, first to restore the victims' lives.

I ask my colleagues to support the Senate bill, the underlying bill, the bill on the floor of the House. I thank the members of the Judiciary Committee of the Senate, the members of the Judiciary Committee here in the House, both the chairman and ranking member, and the members of our committee as we work through this process, and all the Members who put forward outstanding initiatives that are now a part of this legislation.

5:42 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:42 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.

5:42 PM EDT

Kristi Lynn Noem, R-SD

Mrs. NOEM. I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, human trafficking is an issue that I believe many people see as far removed from them and their families, but the reality is that it is happening all around us: in our schools, near our homes, on Web sites that our kids visit and frequent.

My words are not intended to alarm people today but to bring into perspective that it isn't just happening overseas or in communities far away from our homes. It is happening across this country, even in my home State of South Dakota.

In my State, there are three main ways that people are trafficked, according to Kimberly LaPlante, who works at an organization called Call to Freedom in Sioux Falls. One, trafficking victims are brought from bigger cities or from our Native American reservations and sent to the North Dakota oil fields. Two, they are sold at large events, like the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Or three, it is homegrown trafficking, meaning this demand originates in my State, and that, by the way, is the most

common problem across this country.

In 2013, the South Dakota Attorney General's Office held a 6-day undercover operation at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in western South Dakota. They put up an online ad and, over the 6 days, received more than 180 responses.

Local law enforcement did the same thing in a community not far from my home. Over the course of 2 days, they received 110 responses.

This form of slavery is happening almost every single day, and it is time we do something about it. This bill is our opportunity to do something about it. It is an opportunity for both Chambers of Congress to stand together and support legislation that protects our children and our communities.

One of the components of this legislation is a provision that I wrote to help combat many of the problems that we are facing in South Dakota but also other places in the country.

[Time: 17:45]

Today there are only about 200 beds for underage victims in the United States. The language that I wrote included in this bill ensures that shelters can get access to more resources to build safe housing for those trying to escape and recover from trafficking.

There is also a severe lack of information about trafficking and its victims. To help prevent it and to intervene when it does occur, my language [Page: H3284]

aims to make sure that the information on the state of trafficking in this country is analyzed and used to decide how those Federal resources should be used to combat it.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to see this package coming to the floor today. I urge the President to sign it quickly so that we can all join hands and act to prevent this human trafficking from continuing across our country and protect as many children and help them heal as we possibly can.