5:32 PM EDT

Don Beyer Jr., D-VA 8th

Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, I am proud to speak in support of our amendment, which would restore the ARPA-E goal of developing energy technologies that result in reductions in energy-related emissions, including greenhouse gases. I believe this is an important and urgent area of research and that it should remain explicitly stated in the statute as a goal for ARPA-E.

When I look at the existing statute, it says:

The goals of ARPA-E shall be reductions of imports of energy from foreign sources; reductions of energy-related emissions, including greenhouses gases; and improvement in the energy efficiency of all economic sectors.

These are the three goals which have been removed from the current bill. Global carbon dioxide concentrations have risen more than 120 parts per million since preindustrial times, half of that arrived just since 1980. The burning of coal, oil, and natural gas is driving the acceleration of greenhouse gas concentrations in our atmosphere. Just 2 weeks ago, NOAA reported that the monthly global average of concentration of carbon dioxide has surpassed 400 parts per million. The last time this happened

was over 1 million years ago.

We must look to develop alternative energy sources that will reduce manmade emissions. ARPA-E is a unique agency that can help us with this mission. Since 2009, it has funded over 400 potentially transformational energy technology projects. A number of these projects have spurred follow-on private sector funding, and a number of ARPA-E awardees have formed startup companies or partnered with other parts of the government and industry to advance their technologies.

Reducing energy-related emissions, including greenhouse gases, is an important component to our Nation's economic and energy security. Therefore, Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support our amendment to reinstate these three goals for ARPA-E, and I reserve the balance of my time.

5:34 PM EDT

Barry Loudermilk, R-GA 11th

Mr. LOUDERMILK. Mr. Chairman, I rise to oppose this amendment to H.R. 1806 because I support research that will enhance both the economic security and the energy security of the United States.

The original America COMPETES Act, which established the Advanced Research Projects Agency within the Department of Energy, ARPA-E, required the agency to only pursue projects that reduce greenhouse gases. The bill before us today, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act, allows any advanced energy technology that could enhance U.S. economic and energy security to compete for ARPA-E funding. This levels the playing field and ensures that ARPA-E funds research with the greatest potential to have

a positive impact on the American economy.

The COMPETES Act provides a balanced approach to ARPA-E by reprioritizing funding towards innovative projects that are truly in need of Federal research dollars. The bill also removes restrictions that allow the administration to play favorites in the energy sector. However, this amendment would strike the language which expands the ARPA-E project eligibility. As a result, this amendment would then limit innovative research and development.

With all of the national security challenges we face today, from terrorism, to cybersecurity breaches, to our skyrocketing national debt, we should focus our attention on broadening our energy base and achieving energy independence, not limiting ourselves to one small area of environmental science. I believe we must adopt an all-of-the-above energy strategy that improves our energy security and emphasizes all energy opportunities, including those which reduce greenhouse gases.

Congress should not put in place arbitrary limits on innovation that will prevent groundbreaking technologies from across the energy sector from participating in ARPA-E programs. I urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment.

5:34 PM EDT

Barry Loudermilk, R-GA 11th

Mr. LOUDERMILK. Mr. Chairman, I rise to oppose this amendment to H.R. 1806 because I support research that will enhance both the economic security and the energy security of the United States.

The original America COMPETES Act, which established the Advanced Research Projects Agency within the Department of Energy, ARPA-E, required the agency to only pursue projects that reduce greenhouse gases. The bill before us today, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act, allows any advanced energy technology that could enhance U.S. economic and energy security to compete for ARPA-E funding. This levels the playing field and ensures that ARPA-E funds research with the greatest potential to have

a positive impact on the American economy.

The COMPETES Act provides a balanced approach to ARPA-E by reprioritizing funding towards innovative projects that are truly in need of Federal research dollars. The bill also removes restrictions that allow the administration to play favorites in the energy sector. However, this amendment would strike the language which expands the ARPA-E project eligibility. As a result, this amendment would then limit innovative research and development.

With all of the national security challenges we face today, from terrorism, to cybersecurity breaches, to our skyrocketing national debt, we should focus our attention on broadening our energy base and achieving energy independence, not limiting ourselves to one small area of environmental science. I believe we must adopt an all-of-the-above energy strategy that improves our energy security and emphasizes all energy opportunities, including those which reduce greenhouse gases.

Congress should not put in place arbitrary limits on innovation that will prevent groundbreaking technologies from across the energy sector from participating in ARPA-E programs. I urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment.

5:36 PM EDT

Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-TX 30th

Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding.

Mr. Chairman, it is deeply troubling to me that this amendment had to be offered. This amendment fixes a provision in this bill that strips away a foundational component of the ARPA-E program.

As virtually every preeminent climatologist in the world agrees, greenhouse gas emissions are growing so rapidly and are a growing threat to our way of life. Why wouldn't we want one of the most innovative agencies to develop technologies that could address this critical issue?

ARPA-E has made good funding choices supporting valuable research, as proven by its impressive track record of successful projects since it was first authorized. I certainly see no value in changing something that no serious energy policy analyst believes is broken.

Mr. DeSaulnier's and Mr. Beyer's amendment sets this clearly misguided provision aside. I enthusiastically support it and urge my colleagues to do so as well.

5:38 PM EDT

Don Beyer Jr., D-VA 8th

Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, I listened with great interest to the rebuttal of the alternative argument from my friend, Mr. Loudermilk, and I found myself agreeing with almost everything that he said, but misunderstanding why retaining these three goals somehow played favorites, how they created arbitrary limits on innovation, and how they opposed efforts to find our economic and [Page: H3459]

energy security. The purpose of the amendment is to recognize that reducing dependence

on foreign oil, that trying to find ways to limit greenhouse gases, and improving the energy efficiency of all economic sectors are worthy goals.

Perhaps what we need to do is add a fourth one, which I would be happy to place first if the chairman would agree, that says the goals will be, first, to develop any breakthroughs in innovation that help the economic and energy security of the Nation so that there is no playing of favorites and there are no arbitrary limitations. If we could work that out, that would be great. Otherwise, Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support the amendment as offered, and I yield back the balance of my

time.

5:38 PM EDT

Don Beyer Jr., D-VA 8th

Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, I listened with great interest to the rebuttal of the alternative argument from my friend, Mr. Loudermilk, and I found myself agreeing with almost everything that he said, but misunderstanding why retaining these three goals somehow played favorites, how they created arbitrary limits on innovation, and how they opposed efforts to find our economic and [Page: H3459]

energy security. The purpose of the amendment is to recognize that reducing dependence

on foreign oil, that trying to find ways to limit greenhouse gases, and improving the energy efficiency of all economic sectors are worthy goals.

Perhaps what we need to do is add a fourth one, which I would be happy to place first if the chairman would agree, that says the goals will be, first, to develop any breakthroughs in innovation that help the economic and energy security of the Nation so that there is no playing of favorites and there are no arbitrary limitations. If we could work that out, that would be great. Otherwise, Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support the amendment as offered, and I yield back the balance of my

time.

5:38 PM EDT

Don Beyer Jr., D-VA 8th

Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Chairman, I listened with great interest to the rebuttal of the alternative argument from my friend, Mr. Loudermilk, and I found myself agreeing with almost everything that he said, but misunderstanding why retaining these three goals somehow played favorites, how they created arbitrary limits on innovation, and how they opposed efforts to find our economic and [Page: H3459]

energy security. The purpose of the amendment is to recognize that reducing dependence

on foreign oil, that trying to find ways to limit greenhouse gases, and improving the energy efficiency of all economic sectors are worthy goals.

Perhaps what we need to do is add a fourth one, which I would be happy to place first if the chairman would agree, that says the goals will be, first, to develop any breakthroughs in innovation that help the economic and energy security of the Nation so that there is no playing of favorites and there are no arbitrary limitations. If we could work that out, that would be great. Otherwise, Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support the amendment as offered, and I yield back the balance of my

time.

5:39 PM EDT

Lamar S. Smith, R-TX 21st

Mr. SMITH of Texas. Mr. Chairman, the gentleman's amendment would remove key policy reforms to ARPA-E from the COMPETES bill and instead place limitations on the research and development conducted at ARPA-E. Federally funded research should include innovative technologies for all forms of energy, not just the President's personal preferences. So I encourage Members to oppose the amendment.

I yield back the balance of my time.

The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Beyer).

The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes appeared to have it.