1:16 PM EDT

Patrick J. Leahy, D-VT

Mr. LEAHY. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the committee amendments be withdrawn; that a Leahy substitute amendment, which is at the desk, be agreed to; the bill, as amended, be read a third time and passed; the motions to reconsider be laid upon the table, with no intervening action or debate; and any statements related to the bill be printed in the Record.

1:16 PM EDT

Patrick J. Leahy, D-VT

Mr. LEAHY. Mr. President, we are a nation in the midst of an unprecedented financial crisis. It is not just our financial enterprises that are shaken but our confidence in our own economic strength. The Members of this Congress and the people of this Nation are being asked to take extraordinary steps to contain the explosions on Wall Street.

We must not, as we try to repair the structure of our financial institutions, neglect the very sources of our economic power. Intellectual property--copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets--is an ever-growing sector of our economy. We are the envy of the world for the quality and the quantity of our innovative and creative goods and services. If we want to continue to lead the world in producing intellectual property, we need to protect Americans' rights in that property.

This bill is among the most important I have championed. I drew on the experiences of thousands of intellectual property owners, hundreds of law enforcement officials, and all the legislators on both sides of the aisle in Congress, and we have a bill that provides a focused and honed set of improvements to the intellectual property law, targeted increases in resources for significant enforcement efforts, streamlined interagency efforts to coordinate governmental intellectual property policies

but also vigorous oversight of the Justice Department's programs.

I thank all those who cosponsored it. Our bill is going to improve the enforcement of our Nation's intellectual property laws, they will bolster our intellectual property-based economy, and it will protect American jobs.

Mr. President, we are a Nation in the midst of an unprecedented financial crisis. It is not just our financial enterprises that are shaken, but our confidence in our own economic strength. The Members of this Congress, and the people of this Nation, are being asked to take extraordinary steps to contain the explosions on Wall Street. We must not, as we try to repair the structure of our financial institutions, neglect the very sources of our economic power. Intellectual property--copyrights,

patents, trademarks, and trade secrets--is an ever-growing sector of our economy. We are the envy of the world for the quality, and the quantity, of our innovative and creative goods and services. If we want to continue to lead the world in producing intellectual property, we need to protect our citizens' rights in that property.

Long ago, I was the Chittenden County State's Attorney in Vermont. There is crime everywhere, even in Vermont, and I prosecuted every kind of case. I will never forget how much successful prosecutions depend on whether the investigators and lawyers charged with protecting the public from crime have the right tools to do so. No matter how dedicated the prosecutor, and no matter how outrageous the crime, if the laws are not clearly and sensibly drafted, or if the resources are simply inadequate,

no justice will be done.

The intellectual property enforcement bill we consider today is designed solely and specifically to ensure that law enforcement has the tools it needs to protect our Nation's impressive array of intellectual property. The revisions to the civil and criminal statutes, the provision of directed resources to Government at all levels, the coordination across the Federal Government of efforts in creating policies and enforcement efforts, and the requirements for reporting to the Congress--all of these

provisions are focused on strengthening the protection of our intellectual property.

Vermont is special to me, and the goods from Vermont that embody intellectual property are prized by consumers around the world. But every State in the Union is home to industries based on intellectual property. The creative and innovative Vermonters that I am proud to call friends and constituents have counterparts in every other State. These individuals and industries are essential to restoring and building our fiscal health. In a time of such frightening economic malaise, we should redouble

our efforts to make sure that the productive and valuable sectors of our economy are freed from the debilitating effects of theft and misappropriation.

Intellectual property is just as vulnerable as it is valuable. The Internet has brought great and positive change to all our lives, but it is also an unparalleled tool for piracy. The increasing inter-connectedness of the globe, and the efficiencies of sharing information quickly and accurately between continents, has made foreign piracy and counterfeiting operations profitable in numerous countries. Americans suffer when their intellectual property is stolen, they suffer when those counterfeit

goods displace sales of the legitimate products, and they suffer when counterfeit products actually harm them, as is sometimes the case with fake pharmaceuticals and faulty electrical products.

This bill is among the most important I have championed. Drawing on the experiences of thousands of intellectual property owners, hundreds of law enforcement officials, and all of the legislators in Congress, it provides a focused and honed set of improvements to the intellectual property law, targeted increases in resources for significant enforcement efforts, streamlined inter-agency efforts to coordinate governmental intellectual property policies, and vigorous oversight of the Justice Department's

programs. I thank all the cosponsors of this legislation for their efforts and support. Our bill will improve the enforcement of our Nation's intellectual property laws, bolster our intellectual property-based economy, and protect American jobs.

END

7:49 PM EDT

Sheldon Whitehouse, D-RI

Mr. WHITEHOUSE. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the committee-reported amendments be withdrawn, that an Inouye substitute amendment, which is at the desk, be agreed to, the bill, as amended, be read a third time and passed, the motions to reconsider be laid upon the table, with no intervening action or debate, and any statements relating to the bill be printed in the Record.