2:55 PM EDT
Eni Faleomavaega, D-AS

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 86) recognizing the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War and reaffirming the United States-Korea alliance, as amended.

The Clerk read the title of the joint resolution.

The text of the joint resolution is as follows:

H.J. Res. 86

Whereas, on June 25, 1950, communist North Korea invaded the Republic of Korea with approximately 135,000 troops, thereby initiating the Korean War;

Whereas, on June 27, 1950, President Harry Truman ordered the United States Armed Forces to help the Republic of Korea defend itself against the North Korean invasion;

Whereas United States and Allied forces recaptured the capital city of Seoul on September 28, 1950, after a successful amphibious landing by the Marine Corps at Inchon on September 15, 1950;

Whereas the hostilities ended in a cease-fire marked by the signing of the armistice at Panmunjom on July 27, 1953, and the peninsula still technically remains in a state of war;

Whereas, during the Korean War, approximately 1,789,000 members of the United States Armed Forces served in-theater along with the forces of the Republic of Korea and 20 other members of the United Nations to defend freedom and democracy;

Whereas casualties of the United States during the Korean War included 54,246 dead (of whom 33,739 were battle deaths), more than 92,100 wounded, and approximately 8,176 listed as missing in action or prisoners of war;

Whereas approximately 6,800,000 American men and women served worldwide in the Armed Forces during the entire Korean War era of June 27, 1950, to January 31, 1955;

Whereas the Korean War Veterans Recognition Act (Public Law 111-41) was enacted on July 27, 2009, so that the honorable service and noble sacrifice by members of the United States Armed Forces in the Korean War will never be forgotten;

Whereas President Barack Obama issued a proclamation to designate July 27, 2009, as the National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day and called upon Americans to display flags at half-staff in memory of the Korean War veterans;

Whereas since 1975, the Republic of Korea has invited thousands of American Korean War veterans, including members of the Korean War Veterans Association, to revisit Korea in appreciation for their sacrifices;

Whereas in the 60 years since the outbreak of the Korean War, the Republic of Korea has emerged from a war-torn economy into one of the major economies in the world and one of the largest trading partners of the United States;

Whereas the Republic of Korea is among the closest allies of the United States, having contributed troops in support of United States operations during the Vietnam war, Gulf war, and operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, while also supporting numerous United Nations peacekeeping missions throughout the world;

Whereas since the end of the Korean War era, more than 28,500 members of the United States Armed Forces have served annually in the United States Forces Korea to defend the Republic of Korea against external aggression, and to promote regional peace;

Whereas North Korea's sinking of the South Korean naval ship, Cheonan, on March 26, 2010, which resulted in the killing of 46 sailors, necessitates a reaffirmation of the United States-Korea alliance in safeguarding the stability of the Korean Peninsula;

Whereas from the ashes of war and the sharing of spilled blood on the battlefield, the United States and the Republic of Korea have continuously stood shoulder-to-shoulder to promote and defend international peace and security, economic prosperity, human rights, and the rule of law both on the Korean Peninsula and beyond; and

Whereas beginning in June 2010, various ceremonies are being planned in the United [Page: H4560]

States and the Republic of Korea to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War and to honor all Korean War veterans: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That Congress--

(1) recognizes the historical importance of the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War, which began on June 25, 1950;

(2) honors the noble service and sacrifice of the United States Armed Forces and the armed forces of allied countries that served in Korea since 1950 to the present;

(3) encourages all Americans to participate in commemorative activities to pay solemn tribute to, and to never forget, the veterans of the Korean War; and

(4) reaffirms the commitment of the United States to its alliance with the Republic of Korea for the betterment of peace and prosperity on the Korean Peninsula.

2:55 PM EDT
Eni Faleomavaega, D-AS

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 86) recognizing the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War and reaffirming the United States-Korea alliance, as amended.

The Clerk read the title of the joint resolution.

The text of the joint resolution is as follows:

H.J. Res. 86

Whereas, on June 25, 1950, communist North Korea invaded the Republic of Korea with approximately 135,000 troops, thereby initiating the Korean War;

Whereas, on June 27, 1950, President Harry Truman ordered the United States Armed Forces to help the Republic of Korea defend itself against the North Korean invasion;

Whereas United States and Allied forces recaptured the capital city of Seoul on September 28, 1950, after a successful amphibious landing by the Marine Corps at Inchon on September 15, 1950;

Whereas the hostilities ended in a cease-fire marked by the signing of the armistice at Panmunjom on July 27, 1953, and the peninsula still technically remains in a state of war;

Whereas, during the Korean War, approximately 1,789,000 members of the United States Armed Forces served in-theater along with the forces of the Republic of Korea and 20 other members of the United Nations to defend freedom and democracy;

Whereas casualties of the United States during the Korean War included 54,246 dead (of whom 33,739 were battle deaths), more than 92,100 wounded, and approximately 8,176 listed as missing in action or prisoners of war;

Whereas approximately 6,800,000 American men and women served worldwide in the Armed Forces during the entire Korean War era of June 27, 1950, to January 31, 1955;

Whereas the Korean War Veterans Recognition Act (Public Law 111-41) was enacted on July 27, 2009, so that the honorable service and noble sacrifice by members of the United States Armed Forces in the Korean War will never be forgotten;

Whereas President Barack Obama issued a proclamation to designate July 27, 2009, as the National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day and called upon Americans to display flags at half-staff in memory of the Korean War veterans;

Whereas since 1975, the Republic of Korea has invited thousands of American Korean War veterans, including members of the Korean War Veterans Association, to revisit Korea in appreciation for their sacrifices;

Whereas in the 60 years since the outbreak of the Korean War, the Republic of Korea has emerged from a war-torn economy into one of the major economies in the world and one of the largest trading partners of the United States;

Whereas the Republic of Korea is among the closest allies of the United States, having contributed troops in support of United States operations during the Vietnam war, Gulf war, and operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, while also supporting numerous United Nations peacekeeping missions throughout the world;

Whereas since the end of the Korean War era, more than 28,500 members of the United States Armed Forces have served annually in the United States Forces Korea to defend the Republic of Korea against external aggression, and to promote regional peace;

Whereas North Korea's sinking of the South Korean naval ship, Cheonan, on March 26, 2010, which resulted in the killing of 46 sailors, necessitates a reaffirmation of the United States-Korea alliance in safeguarding the stability of the Korean Peninsula;

Whereas from the ashes of war and the sharing of spilled blood on the battlefield, the United States and the Republic of Korea have continuously stood shoulder-to-shoulder to promote and defend international peace and security, economic prosperity, human rights, and the rule of law both on the Korean Peninsula and beyond; and

Whereas beginning in June 2010, various ceremonies are being planned in the United [Page: H4560]

States and the Republic of Korea to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War and to honor all Korean War veterans: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That Congress--

(1) recognizes the historical importance of the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War, which began on June 25, 1950;

(2) honors the noble service and sacrifice of the United States Armed Forces and the armed forces of allied countries that served in Korea since 1950 to the present;

(3) encourages all Americans to participate in commemorative activities to pay solemn tribute to, and to never forget, the veterans of the Korean War; and

(4) reaffirms the commitment of the United States to its alliance with the Republic of Korea for the betterment of peace and prosperity on the Korean Peninsula.

2:56 PM EDT
Eni Faleomavaega, D-AS

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the resolution under consideration.

2:56 PM EDT
Eni Faleomavaega, D-AS

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support of this joint resolution, and I yield myself such time as I may consume.

This resolution before us today, House Joint Resolution 86, recognizes the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War and reaffirms the strong United States-Republic of Korea alliance. This resolution will help ensure that the bonds we forged in blood during the Korean War will never be forgotten.

Today, the United States and Republic of Korea relationship is stronger than ever, encompassing social, cultural, economic, security and diplomatic relations. Last year's joint vision statement between our two nations provided an important reminder to the importance of the bilateral relationship between our two countries. Our two countries are working as closely as ever on the problems of North Korea, which is critically important since North Korea continues its provocations, including nuclear

and missile tests and just recently the sinking of the South Korean ship, the Cheonan, which resulted in the deaths of some 46 sailors from this tragedy.

With President Lee chairing the G-20 meeting this year in South Korea, this is certainly indicative of South Korea's prominence in international trade and economic development. For our part, Madam Speaker, I have long supported the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement to further such growth. I continue to hope that the Congress will also pass this free trade agreement as soon as possible because it will reinforce U.S.-Korean ties and create American jobs. And for the benefit of my colleagues, I want

to note that this free trade agreement with South Korea will provide somewhere between $11 billion and $20 billion in export trade between our two countries which will be of tremendous benefit to both our countries.

I also want to thank my dear friend, the gentleman from New York, Congressman CHARLES RANGEL, for his service to our country during the Korean War, for his long and able service in the House of Representatives, and for his authorship of this important resolution. I also want to note our other colleagues who are also veterans of the Korean War, Congressman JOHN CONYERS of Michigan, Congressman SAMUEL JOHNSON of Texas, and Congressman HOWARD COBLE of North Carolina.

My apologies if I may have left out other Members. It was certainly not intentional, Madam Speaker, but I also want to thank them as well.

Congressman Rangel fought in the Korean War from 1950 to 1952 as a member of the 503rd Battalion, an all-black artillery unit, in the 2nd Infantry Division. In late November 1950, his unit was engaged in heavy fighting in North Korea; and at the Battle of Kunu-ri, Congressman Rangel was part of a vehicle column that was trapped and attacked by the Chinese Army.

[Time: 15:00]

During that attack, he was injured in the back by shrapnel from a Chinese bomb shell. In subzero weather, members of the 503rd Battalion looked to RANGEL, then just a private first class, for his leadership. During 3 days of freezing weather, he led approximately 40 men from his unit out of the Chinese encirclement.

When asked about his experience in battle, Congressman Rangel commented, ``That was the coldest place, ever, in the whole world. We lost a lot of guys who froze to death in their sleeping bags.'' Nearly half of the 503rd Battalion were killed in the overall battle. And might I mention, a battalion is composed of about 600 soldiers. So you can imagine if 50 percent of the 503rd Battalion were killed in the Korean War.

Congressman Rangel was later recognized for his courage and awarded a Purple Heart for his wounds and the Bronze Star for Valor for his heroic efforts. In addition, he was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation, the Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation and three battle stars.

In summing up his experience, Congressman Rangel once said, ``Since Kunu-Ri--and I mean it with all my heart--I have never, never had a bad day.''

I might also note, Congressman JOHN CONYERS from Michigan served for 2 years in the Michigan National Guard starting in 1950. With the onset of the Korean War, he joined the U.S. Army and fought for 1 year as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For his service, he was awarded both combat and merit citations.

Congressman Sam Johnson began his 29-year career in the U.S. Air Force at the early age of 20. During the Korean War, he was stationed just 25 miles away from the front lines and flew 62 combat missions in his F-86 Saber jet fighter. In his plane, Shirley's Texas Tornado, named after his dear wife, Congressman Johnson scored one MiG fighter kill, one probable kill and one damaged. He flew on combat missions with Buzz Aldrin and John Glenn, and when he shot down the Russian MiG,

he was so low on fuel that he actually had to glide back to Seoul. He went on to continue his outstanding military career through the Vietnam War as director of the Air Force Fighter Weapons School, known as Top Gun, and was one of the two authors of the air tactics manual revolutionizing military air dominance by incorporating three-dimensional flight.

Our good friend, Congressman HOWARD COBLE, meanwhile, served in the Coast Guard from September 1952 until September 1956, and was deployed to Korean waters during the war.

I ask all of my colleagues to join me in honoring the sacrifices of these gentlemen, our colleagues, Congressman Rangel, Congressman Conyers, Congressman Johnson, and Congressman Coble, and the sacrifices of all of the other 1.8 million Americans who fought in the Korean War, as well as in recognizing the vital importance of the U.S.-Korean alliance by supporting this resolution; and also noting as a matter of history that over 30,000 of our soldiers died from

that terrible conflict in South Korea.

COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES,

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, DC, June 15, 2010.

Hon. Howard Berman,

Chairman, Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC.

Dear Chairman Berman: I am writing to you concerning H.J. Res. 86, recognizing the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War and reaffirming the United States-Korea alliance. This measure was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and in addition to the Committee on Armed Services, and Veterans' Affairs, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.

Our Committee recognizes the importance of H.J. Res 86, and the need for the legislation to move expeditiously. Therefore, while we have a valid claim to jurisdiction over this legislation, the Committee on Armed Services will waive further consideration of H.J. Res 86. I do so with the understanding that by waiving consideration of the resolution, the Committee on Armed Services does not waive any future jurisdictional claim over the subject matters contained in the resolution which fall within

its Rule X jurisdiction.

Please place this letter and a copy of your response into the Congressional Record during consideration of the measure on the [Page: H4561]

House floor. Thank you for the cooperative spirit in which you have worked regarding this matter and others between our respective committees.

Very truly yours,

Ike Skelton,

Chairman.

--

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS,

U.S.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

,

Washington, DC, June 14, 2010.

Hon. Ike Skelton,

Chairman, Committee on Armed Services, House Office Building, Washington, DC.

Dear Mr. Chairman: Thank you for your letter regarding House Joint Resolution 86, recognizing the 60th Anniversary of the Korean War and affirming the United States-Korea alliance. This measure was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, in addition to the Committee on Armed Services, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.

I agree that the Committee on Armed Services has certain valid jurisdictional claims to this resolution, and I appreciate your decision to waive further consideration of H.J. Res. 86 in the interest of expediting consideration of this important measure. I understand that by agreeing to waive further consideration, the Committee on Armed Services is not waiving its jurisdictional claims over similar measures in the future.

During consideration of this measure on the House floor, I will ask that this exchange of letters be included in the Congressional Record.

Sincerely,

Howard L. Berman,

Chairman.

--

COMMITTEE ON VETERANS' AFFAIRS,

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, DC, June 10, 2010.

Hon. HOWARD L. BERMAN,

Chairman, Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC.

Dear Chairman Berman: On May 25, 2010, H.J. Res. 86, recognizing the 60th anniversary of the Korean War and reaffirming the United States-Korea alliance, was introduced in the House of Representatives. This measure was sequentially referred to the Committee on Veterans' Affairs.

The Committee on Veterans' Affairs recognizes the importance of H.J. Res. 86 and the need to move this resolution expeditiously to recognize the 60th anniversary of the Korean War and to reaffirm our alliance with Korea. Therefore, while we have certain valid jurisdictional claims to this resolution, the Committee on Veterans' Affairs will waive further consideration of H.J. Res. 86. The Committee does so with the understanding that by waiving further consideration of this resolution, it does

not waive any future jurisdictional claims over similar measures.

I would appreciate the inclusion of this letter and a copy of your response in the Congressional Record during consideration of H.J. Res. 86 on the House floor.

Sincerely,

Bob Filner,

Chairman.

--

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS,

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, DC, June 14, 2010.

Hon. Bob Filner,

Chairman,

Committee on Veterans' Affairs, Cannon House Office Building, Washington, DC.

Dear Chairman Filner: Thank you for your letter concerning H.J. Res. 86, recognizing the 60th Anniversary of the Korean War and affirming the United States-Korea alliance. I acknowledge that the Committee on Veterans Affairs has a valid jurisdictional claim in this resolution, and I appreciate your willingness to waive jurisdiction so we may proceed to suspension.

I agree to submit this exchange of letters in the Congressional Record, and I thank you again for your expeditious review of this legislation.

Sincerely,

Howard L. Berman,

Chairman.

Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

3:03 PM EDT
John Boozman, R-AR 3rd

Mr. BOOZMAN. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

I rise in support of this measure and would like to thank the gentleman from New York (Mr. Rangel), a distinguished veteran of the Korean War for introducing it. We truly do appreciate your service to our country.

Next week, on June 25, represents the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War. The lesson of Korea is the need for constant vigilance in the face of external aggression.

Many link Kim Il Sung's decision to suddenly and deliberately attack the Republic of Korea in the early morning hours of a rainy Sunday morning to mixed signals coming from Washington, for then-Secretary of State Dean Acheson had declared only a few months before that South Korea lay outside the defense perimeter of the United States.

North Korean dictator Kim Il Sung reportedly took that as a green light to move forward with his invasion plans. This invasion resulted in between 1 and 2 million Korean dead, and over 50,000 dead and more than 90,000 wounded members of the U.S. military.

The lesson of June 25 is clear: do not equivocate with aggressors, do not pander to dictators.

Harry Truman, in notifying the American people of his decision to deploy U.S. forces to Korea, stated that North Korea, in solidarity with its Communist allies ``has passed beyond the use of subversion to conquer independent nations.''

Sixty years later, as North Korea engages in further armed aggression by deliberately torpedoing a South Korean naval vessel and murdering 46 South Korean sailors, it is clear that the United States and its allies must act with firm resolve to prevent an escalation of violence in and around the Korean peninsula.

As we honor the valiant dead who fell in Korea, let us resolve to preserve that peace and prosperity for which they gave the last full measure of devotion. The events of the last six decades remind us all that the sacrifices of our soldiers and our United Nations allies were worthwhile.

One only has to compare the thriving, democratic vitality of the Republic of Korea with the impoverished and repressed hell that is North Korea to recognize the value and the purpose of that valiant sacrifice.

I reserve the balance of my time.

3:06 PM EDT
Eni Faleomavaega, D-AS

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Madam Speaker, as a veteran of the Vietnam War, I am deeply honored to yield all the time he needs to the gentleman from New York (Mr. Rangel), the author of this resolution.

3:06 PM EDT
Charles B. Rangel, D-NY 15th

Mr. RANGEL. Madam Speaker, I thank the chairman for his gracious remarks and the work he has done to facilitate the bringing to this floor this resolution. I want to thank the other side of the aisle. I have never seen anything move so fast, and I am so deeply grateful that this happened.

Some of you don't know, but the Korean Government invited JOHN CONYERS, SAM JOHNSON, HOWARD COBLE and me to go to Korea on June 24 and 25, but the legislative calendar prevented this from happening. But because of their enthusiastic support, as well as mine, next week the Speaker and the minority leader have agreed not to forget those people who served our country; and, indeed, served the international freedom community.

I want to thank also from my office Emile Milne and Hannah Kim for working with all of the committees that had jurisdiction to expedite the fact that this will be done before June 25.

I am reminded when you gave the facts that led up to the North Koreans invading South Korea, I was a 20-year-old kid in the barracks in Fort Lewis, Washington, when a sergeant screamed that the North Koreans had invading South Korea and the Second Infantry Division was slated to go to defend them. I was so anxious to leave Fort Lewis, I said: Hurrah. Where the heck is Korea?

I had no idea that a police action involved putting yourself in harm's way. But away we did go. There was some question at that time whether we could even land in Pusan because the North Korean Communists had been so successful that they drove the 25th Division and Japan and the People's Republic of South Korea to the Pusan peninsula, but we were able to push them back. The marines landed in Inchon and the Chinese came, and you know the rest of that story.

But how grateful I am to be not just alive, but to know we all participated once again in defending a democracy even in countries where we don't know the people and don't know the country. And as a result of that, one of America's strongest allies is the government of Korea. The truth of the matter is with China there and North Korea there, and especially the threat of Iran, South Korea has represented a symbol not only of democratic principles but a symbol of what can happen economically when

freedom and democracy is the atmosphere in which we are working.

Those of us who served, especially the 50,000 who did not come back home, the close to 100,000 that were wounded, the 8,000 that were prisoners of war, we had no idea that our sacrifice would rebuild a nation from ashes to the great [Page: H4562]

economic power it is today, and the great contributions Korean-Americans make each and every day in all parts of every town, city and every state that we have.

But I want to particularly thank JOHN CONYERS who is the next highest senior member here in the House of Representatives. I want to thank HOWARD COBLE. He is a veterans' veteran. There is not a day I see him that he does not remind me and others that we should never forget the sacrifices that are made for all of us and our children and our children's children. And, of course, SAM JOHNSON who I serve with on the Ways and Means Committee, is truly a hero. Very few Americans

are living who have made the type of sacrifices that he has made for his country.

So collectively and on behalf of all of the veterans who have served, and particularly for this war that they call the Forgotten War, we were sandwiched between the World War II and the Vietnam War. So many people asked when we came back home: Where were you? They had no idea America had been involved. But we were involved.

The 21 nations will have representatives here next week to thank America, as we thank them, for allowing this great country to be involved in what appeared to be a very unimportant crisis. But at the end of the day, this country has risen to be one of our best trading partners, one of our best political partners, and certainly has made an outstanding contribution to the entire world of free countries and free people.

And so, Chairman FALEOMAVAEGa, I thank you for giving us the opportunity to celebrate this occasion and never to forget those who made it possible for us to be free men and free women.

3:12 PM EDT
John Boozman, R-AR 3rd

Mr. BOOZMAN. Madam Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Coble), ranking member of the Judiciary Subcommittee on the Courts and a distinguished veteran of the Korean War.

3:12 PM EDT
Howard Coble, R-NC 6th

Mr. COBLE. Madam Speaker, I too want to express thanks to the gentleman from American Samoa and the gentleman from Arkansas for having very ably managed this resolution, and I am pleased indeed today to be on the House floor with my friend from New York and my friend from Texas, Mr. Rangel and Mr. Johnson.

I rise in support of H.J. Res. 86, and while there is little I can add to enhance the merit of this resolution, I want to remind everyone that technically speaking the Korean conflict has not ended. The recent actions by North Korea against South Korea and the Chinese should not be taken lightly. South Korea is our true ally on the Korean peninsula. Although I have no solution for the growing threat of North Korea, at this point it seems to me the immediate course of action should be for America

to continue to embrace and support South Korea.

This resolution correctly states that we have successfully partnered with the Republic of Korea to promote international peace and security, economic prosperity, human rights, and the rule of law on the Korean peninsula and beyond.

To that end, I encourage my colleagues to support H.J. Res. 86.

[Time: 15:15]

3:14 PM EDT
John Boozman, R-AR 3rd

Mr. BOOZMAN. Madam Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Sam Johnson), ranking member of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Social Security and a distinguished veteran of the Korean War.

3:14 PM EDT
Sam Johnson, R-TX 3rd

Mr. SAM JOHNSON of Texas. Thank you, both of you over there on the Democrat side, for getting this bill out.

Today marks a new milestone for those who fought in the forgotten war, which was Korea. And today the United States Congress recognizes the importance of their service and reaffirms our longstanding commitment to freedom and the future of Korea.

As many know, it was June 25, 1950, when Communist North Korea invaded the Republic of Korea with 135,000 troops, and that sparked the start of the Korean War. And what people don't realize about Charlie Rangel is he could be dead because he was up on the Yalu River when the Chinese decided to come across. So he saved a lot of lives and buried a lot of guys. I thank you, Charlie, for that service. And Howard, I thank you as well for serving over there.

On June 27, 1950, President Truman ordered the United States Armed Forces to help the Republic of Korea defend itself against the North Korean invasion. While it ended in an armistice, the bitter conflict between Korea and North Korea still lingers on. We all know that. Korea is a strong ally, and America remains committed to Korea's safety, survival, and success.

By commemorating the 60th anniversary of the start of the Korean War, the United States Congress and the country rededicate our promise to thank those who wore the uniform during that time. An estimated 5 million valiant men and women served in the Korean War.

As a Korean War veteran who flew 62 combat missions, it brings me great pleasure to remind Americans of the sacrifice and service of those who fought in Korea. To the esteemed Korean War veterans, you are not forgotten. We honor you, we appreciate you, God bless you. And I salute each and every one of you.

3:17 PM EDT
Eni Faleomavaega, D-AS

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Madam Speaker, I would like to certainly compliment and thank our distinguished veterans of the Korean War, now Members, our colleagues here in this institution, for not only sharing with us their experiences, but the fact that this close relationship that we have with the Republic of Korea should never be lessened in any way.

It's been my privilege over the years to have visited the Republic of Korea, visited with their leaders. And the outstanding results of now South Korea becoming one of the great economic powers of Southeast Asia, I might say, is mainly because of our close economic ties. I also want to note the fact that the number one electronic company in the world is in South Korea. Also, the number one shipbuilding company is in South Korea.

I sincerely hope that in the coming months we will be able to continue to negotiate successfully the proposed free trade agreement that was done previously by the previous administration and negotiators. It's my understanding that as a result of this proposed free trade agreement we stand to gain at least somewhere between $11 to $20 billion in exports of our products to South Korea if we get an approval of this proposed agreement.

I also want to note, as a matter of a little history, and complement what my friend from New York has stated about the people and the good leaders of South Korea. My own personal experience while serving in Vietnam, I tell you, you really know who your real friends are. The fact that there were 50,000 South Korean soldiers fighting alongside American soldiers in Vietnam, now that is where you really know who your real friends are. The leaders and the people of South Korea came and joined us in

that terrible conflict that our Nation was confronted with in fighting communism.

It's also my understanding that in the coming months, the President of Korea will be presiding over the G-20 meeting of 20 of the most prominent countries economically, and hopefully there will be better solutions given to the economic demise that not only the world is faced with now, especially the contributions that the 20 countries can offer in solving some of the serious economic problems that we are confronted with today.

3:20 PM EDT
Charles B. Rangel, D-NY 15th

Mr. RANGEL. And I want you to know this is just the beginning of the United States of America's involvement. In September of this year, in commemoration of the lives that were lost by Koreans and Americans and the other 20 countries that fought against communism, there will be a commemorative ceremony in Seoul, which our State Department will be participating in. And again, my colleagues have been invited to join, but the situation here in Congress didn't allow us to accept. [Page:

H4563]

But Mr. Boehner, the minority leader, as well as our distinguished Speaker had thought that since we could not be represented over in Seoul next week, that a reception will be held right here and a ceremony in Statuary Hall, where the participants from the free countries that joined with us will be there with their representatives. And we have invited veterans that have served in Korea to come join us.

The reason I constantly say I haven't had a bad day since, and to say how good God is, is because it's been 60 years ago. And recently, that is last week at the Kennedy Center, the Korean Angels, a young group that's trained to go around the world talking about peace and harmony to the world, celebrated and they lauded the Korean veterans. And my colleagues here on the House floor would know they came with crutches and wheelchairs and canes, but they did come.

And what this House and Senate will be doing for them, even if they are not able to come to Washington, they will be able to tell their kids and their grandkids and their neighbors and friends that their sacrifice has not been forgotten. And I do hope that you and the chairman and subcommittee chairman that expedited this, and the Members that hopefully will be supporting this in the House and Senate, would realize how many lives they are making more bright by reminding their loved ones of those

that were left behind, that what they lost, the pain that they felt is not forgotten by the United States.

And it gives us a time once again to talk about the brave men and women that are in the Middle East, that are in Afghanistan. Each and every day that we are allowed to breathe the breath of democracy, to get up and to do and say what we want is only because they are willing to put their lives in harm's way for our flag and for our country and for the freedom that's here.

So all of us, in a sense, whether it was in World War II, whether it was Korea, whether it was the Persian Gulf where my son served as a Marine, or whether or not it's the present crisis that we face in the Middle East, we have so much to be fortunate that in this country there is a spirit that we defend what is right, what is moral, and at the end of the day we are better people, we are better legislators, and we are a better country for it. And so everyone who votes today, I think it's our

way of saying ``thank you'' for those who made the sacrifice and also ``thank you'' for those who continue to do it as we speak today.

3:23 PM EDT
Eni Faleomavaega, D-AS

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. I thank the gentleman for his comments.

I might also note, Madam Speaker, that out of some 15 million Asian Pacific Americans, we have well over 2 million Korean Americans as part of the fiber of our great democracy that have made tremendous contributions to our country. I wanted to just note that for the record.

I reserve the balance of my time.