American Artifacts: AHTV- Henry Ford Museum American History TV visits The Henry Ford museum in Dearborn, Michigan to learn about Ford's life, tour the presidential vehicles collection, and look at changes to cars and trains in America.

Program Segments

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    6:00 PM EDT

    Cars in America

    American History TV toured the “Driving America” exhibit at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. Transportation curator Matt Anderson showed early vehicles made by Henry Ford, including the iconic Model T, and the sporty and stylized Mustang and heard how and why the brand changed over time.

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    5:59 PM EDT

    Cars in America From World War II to the 1980s

    In the second of a two-part program, American History TV toured the “Driving America” exhibit at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. Transportation curator Matt Anderson showed a 1931 Bugatti and described how auto manufacturing changed during World War II. He also explained how vehicles evolved based on customer preference and available technology.

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    6:00 PM EST

    Henry Ford's Garage and Childhood Home

    Historic structures curator Jim Johnson gave a tour of the garage where Henry Ford built his first car, the quadricycle, and Ford’s childhood home, where he was born in 1863. Both buildings were relocated to Greenfield Village, the living history section of The Henry Ford in Dearborn, Michigan.

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    6:00 PM EDT

    Presidential Vehicles

    Transportation curator Matt Anderson gave a tour of the presidential vehicles collection at the Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation in Dearborn, Michigan. He showed cars that transported Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Carter, and Reagan, and the Lincoln Continental that John F. Kennedy was riding in when he was assassinated.

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    6:00 PM EDT

    Railroads and Rail Cars

    Transportation curator Matt Anderson gave a tour of the railroad exhibit at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, and talked about the progression of American rail from the early 1800s through the 1950s. He showed an 1831 steam locomotive and a 125-foot Allegheny engine that weighs nearly 400 tons.