American History TV Schedule

Week of March 13 through March 20

All times and durations are subject to change

Saturday, March 17
7:59 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 8 min.Oral Histories Susan Rothmann West Point InterviewSusan Rothmann talked about her experiences as a U.S. Army spouse, dealing with anti-war sentiment ... Susan Rothmann talked about her experiences as a U.S. Army spouse, dealing with anti-war sentiment while her husband fought in Vietnam, leading the Fort Campbell Family Readiness Group, and taking care of families following the 1985 Gander tragedy, when 248 American soldiers, most of them from the same division, died in a plane crash in Gander, Newfoundland. The interview is held by The West Point Center for Oral History. 9:07 AM EDTApprox. 57 min.LIVE The Civil War Abraham Lincoln's Life & LegacyAmerican History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on ... American History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on Abraham Lincoln's life, career & legacy. The Abraham Lincoln Institute & Ford's Theatre Society co-hosted the event. 10:04 AM EDTApprox. 14 min.R.J. & Katharine Reynolds at ReynoldaKatharine Reynolds, the wife of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, envisioned and built Reynolda in ... Katharine Reynolds, the wife of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, envisioned and built Reynolda in 1917. Director of Program and Interpretation Phil Archer toured the home's most used rooms.
10:18 AM EDTApprox. 8 min.Preserving Happy HillDuring Reconstruction, African Americans in Winston settled in an area that became known as the ... During Reconstruction, African Americans in Winston settled in an area that became known as the Happy Hill neighborhood. Cheryl Harry, Organizer of the Happy Hill Shotgun House Project, explained her 30-year effort to preserve what's left of the community. 10:26 AM EDTApprox. 50 min.LIVE The Civil War Abraham Lincoln's Life & LegacyAmerican History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on ... American History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on Abraham Lincoln's life, career & legacy. The Abraham Lincoln Institute & Ford's Theatre Society co-hosted the event. 11:16 AM EDTApprox. 10 min.Hidden TownOld Salem was one of the first history sites in North America to begin interpreting the narrative ... Old Salem was one of the first history sites in North America to begin interpreting the narrative of enslaved African Americans. President Frank Vagnone explained how Old Salem is uncovering details about their lives through the Hidden Town Project.
11:36 AM EDTApprox. 52 min.LIVE The Civil War Abraham Lincoln's Life & LegacyAmerican History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on ... American History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on Abraham Lincoln's life, career & legacy. The Abraham Lincoln Institute & Ford's Theatre Society co-hosted the event. 12:28 PM EDTApprox. 25 min.American Artifacts The House Where Lincoln Died 12:53 PM EDTApprox. 25 min.American Artifacts Lincoln Assassination NewsCarrie Chistofferson talked about the Newseum exhibit of New York Herald special editions ... Carrie Chistofferson talked about the Newseum exhibit of New York Herald special editions published on April 14-15, 1865, which show how the news unfolded after President Lincoln was shot.
1:18 PM EDTApprox. 28 min.Old SalemOld Salem, a historic district in Winston-Salem, North Carolina features the history of the ... Old Salem, a historic district in Winston-Salem, North Carolina features the history of the Moravians, a Protestant sect who hailed from present day Czech Republic. Built starting in 1766, the town is a mix of original and restored buildings, as well as trade shops and gardens. Director of Research and Outreach, Martha Hartley, shared the history and explained how Salem changed from the colonial era through the Civil War as well as what visitors see today. 1:46 PM EDTApprox. 56 min.LIVE The Civil War Abraham Lincoln's Life & LegacyAmerican History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on ... American History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on Abraham Lincoln's life, career & legacy. The Abraham Lincoln Institute & Ford's Theatre Society co-hosted the event. 2:42 PM EDTApprox. 24 min.American Artifacts Museum of Early Southern Decorative ArtsThe Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts features furniture, paintings, textiles and ceramics ... The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts features furniture, paintings, textiles and ceramics made and used by people in the southern states. Curator Daniel Ackerman highlighted objects that help tell the history of the area from the colonial through the Antebellum era.
3:06 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 46 min.LIVE The Civil War Abraham Lincoln's Life & LegacyAmerican History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on ... American History TV coverage from Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC of a day-long symposium on Abraham Lincoln's life, career & legacy. The Abraham Lincoln Institute & Ford's Theatre Society co-hosted the event. 4:52 PM EDTApprox. 59 min.History Bookshelf Gerard Magliocca, American Founding SonGerard Magliocca talked about his book, American Founding Son: John Bingham and the Invention of ... Gerard Magliocca talked about his book, American Founding Son: John Bingham and the Invention of the Fourteenth Amendment, in which he recounts the life of lawyer and Ohio Congressman John Bingham, responsible for drafting Section One of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution that guarantees equal treatment to all Americans. In his book, the author reports that Bingham, an antislavery lawyer, played a critical role in policy toward Confederate states following the Civil War and worked to impeach President Andrew Johnson. Mr. Magliocca spoke at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 6:00 PM EDTApprox. 49 min.The Civil War Children and the Civil WarUniversity of Richmond professor Lauranett Lee discussed how children were affected during the ... University of Richmond professor Lauranett Lee discussed how children were affected during the Civil War Era, and compared this history to the continuing twenty-first century problem of war, children, and refugees. This talk was part of the American Civil War Museum's annual symposium co-hosted by the Library of Virginia in Richmond, the American Civil War Museum and the University of Virginia Center for Civil War History.
6:49 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Educational Uses of Public BroadcastingA panel marked the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 by discussing the ... A panel marked the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 by discussing the educational uses of public broadcasting, including thoughts on the origins of Sesame Street and NOVA. They also explored how these programs can be viewed as historical artifacts of cultural and educational changes in the United States. 7:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 25 min.Lectures in History Physical Education & Health in Public SchoolsThe New School professor Natalia Mehlman Petrzela taught a class about the history of health and ... The New School professor Natalia Mehlman Petrzela taught a class about the history of health and physical education in the American school system. She described how progressives in the early 1900s used compulsory education to assimilate immigrant children and tackle a wide range of health issues. She outlined how the importance, funding, and understanding of health and physical activity have changed through different eras and under various presidential administrations. 9:24 PM EDTApprox. 20 min.American Artifacts Museum of Early Southern Decorative ArtsThe Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts features furniture, paintings, textiles and ceramics ... The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts features furniture, paintings, textiles and ceramics made and used by people in the southern states. Curator Daniel Ackerman highlighted objects that help tell the history of the area from the colonial through the Antebellum era.
9:44 PM EDTApprox. 16 min.Race and Baseball in AmericaUniversity of Illinois history professor Adrian Burgos talks about the history of race and ... University of Illinois history professor Adrian Burgos talks about the history of race and baseball in America in this interview recorded at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C. 10:00 PM EDTApprox. 24 min.Reel America Interviews with My Lai Veterans - 1970This 1970 Academy Award-winning short documentary recounts the events of March 16, 1968 in the ... This 1970 Academy Award-winning short documentary recounts the events of March 16, 1968 in the village of My Lai, Vietnam from the perspective of five Army veterans who were there. In graphic detail the men describe the situation before, during, and after the killing of between 347 (U.S. Army estimate) and 504 (Vietnamese government estimate) unarmed Vietnamese civilians. The veterans describe witnessing the killing of small children, elderly villagers, and the raping and killing of women, then reflect on how and why this and other massacres happened during the war. 10:24 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 36 min.Frederick Douglass BicentennialHistorian David Blight, director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance ... Historian David Blight, director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition presented a talk titled "Frederick Douglass at 200." Professor Blight discussed Douglass's life and work as an escaped slave, abolitionist, public speaker, and writer, as well as how we think about him now. The Maryland Historical Society hosted this event to mark the bicentennial of the birth of Frederick Douglass.
Sunday, March 18
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 25 min.Lectures in History Physical Education & Health in Public SchoolsThe New School professor Natalia Mehlman Petrzela taught a class about the history of health and ... The New School professor Natalia Mehlman Petrzela taught a class about the history of health and physical education in the American school system. She described how progressives in the early 1900s used compulsory education to assimilate immigrant children and tackle a wide range of health issues. She outlined how the importance, funding, and understanding of health and physical activity have changed through different eras and under various presidential administrations. 1:25 AM EDTApprox. 20 min.R.J. & Katharine Reynolds at ReynoldaKatharine Reynolds, the wife of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, envisioned and built Reynolda in ... Katharine Reynolds, the wife of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, envisioned and built Reynolda in 1917. Director of Program and Interpretation Phil Archer toured the home's most used rooms. 1:45 AM EDTApprox. 15 min.Race and Baseball in AmericaUniversity of Illinois history professor Adrian Burgos talks about the history of race and ... University of Illinois history professor Adrian Burgos talks about the history of race and baseball in America in this interview recorded at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C.
2:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.History Bookshelf Gerard Magliocca, American Founding SonGerard Magliocca talked about his book, American Founding Son: John Bingham and the Invention of ... Gerard Magliocca talked about his book, American Founding Son: John Bingham and the Invention of the Fourteenth Amendment, in which he recounts the life of lawyer and Ohio Congressman John Bingham, responsible for drafting Section One of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution that guarantees equal treatment to all Americans. In his book, the author reports that Bingham, an antislavery lawyer, played a critical role in policy toward Confederate states following the Civil War and worked to impeach President Andrew Johnson. Mr. Magliocca spoke at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 3:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Oral Histories Susan Rothmann West Point InterviewSusan Rothmann talked about her experiences as a U.S. Army spouse, dealing with anti-war sentiment ... Susan Rothmann talked about her experiences as a U.S. Army spouse, dealing with anti-war sentiment while her husband fought in Vietnam, leading the Fort Campbell Family Readiness Group, and taking care of families following the 1985 Gander tragedy, when 248 American soldiers, most of them from the same division, died in a plane crash in Gander, Newfoundland. The interview is held by The West Point Center for Oral History. 4:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 38 min.The Presidency Ulysses S. GrantCharles Calhoun reevaluated the 18th president. Mr. Calhoun is the author of "The Presidency of ... Charles Calhoun reevaluated the 18th president. Mr. Calhoun is the author of "The Presidency of Ulysses S. Grant." He explained why Grant was considered an unsuccessful chief executive by many early 20th century historians despite his domestic and foreign policy achievements. He argued that Grant was actually an influential president dogged by political enemies and scandal. The Smithsonian Associates hosted this program.
5:38 AM EDTApprox. 24 min.Old SalemOld Salem, a historic district in Winston-Salem, North Carolina features the history of the ... Old Salem, a historic district in Winston-Salem, North Carolina features the history of the Moravians, a Protestant sect who hailed from present day Czech Republic. Built starting in 1766, the town is a mix of original and restored buildings, as well as trade shops and gardens. Director of Research and Outreach, Martha Hartley, shared the history and explained how Salem changed from the colonial era through the Civil War as well as what visitors see today. 6:02 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 8 min.Educational Uses of Public BroadcastingA panel marked the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 by discussing the ... A panel marked the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 by discussing the educational uses of public broadcasting, including thoughts on the origins of Sesame Street and NOVA. They also explored how these programs can be viewed as historical artifacts of cultural and educational changes in the United States. 7:35 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.History Bookshelf John Barry, The Great InfluenzaMr. Barry talked about his book The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in ... Mr. Barry talked about his book The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History, published by Viking Press. The book discusses an influenza that spread across the globe in 1918, causing more deaths than both AIDS and SARS. Mr. Barry discussed the critical role doctors from the newly formed Johns Hopkins Medical School in Baltimore played in tracking the virus and the ways in which they were able to contain the outbreak. He claimed that another pandemic is not only possible, but also long overdue. He also discussed how governments do not always tell the truth involving public health concerns, such as in the 1918 influenza epidemic and the recent SARS outbreak. After his presentation, the author answered questions from members of the audience.
8:30 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.LIVE 1968 - America in Turmoil Vietnam WarVietnam War veteran & former Navy secretary Jim Webb and author David Maraniss discuss the major ... Vietnam War veteran & former Navy secretary Jim Webb and author David Maraniss discuss the major military, political and diplomatic developments in the Vietnam War during 1968 from the January Tet Offensive to the undoing of LBJ's presidency. 10:00 AM EDTApprox. 25 min.Reel America Interviews with My Lai Veterans - 1970This 1970 Academy Award-winning short documentary recounts the events of March 16, 1968 in the ... This 1970 Academy Award-winning short documentary recounts the events of March 16, 1968 in the village of My Lai, Vietnam from the perspective of five Army veterans who were there. In graphic detail the men describe the situation before, during, and after the killing of between 347 (U.S. Army estimate) and 504 (Vietnamese government estimate) unarmed Vietnamese civilians. The veterans describe witnessing the killing of small children, elderly villagers, and the raping and killing of women, then reflect on how and why this and other massacres happened during the war. 10:25 AM EDTApprox. 16 min.R.J. & Katharine Reynolds at ReynoldaKatharine Reynolds, the wife of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, envisioned and built Reynolda in ... Katharine Reynolds, the wife of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, envisioned and built Reynolda in 1917. Director of Program and Interpretation Phil Archer toured the home's most used rooms.
10:41 AM EDTApprox. 58 min.The Civil War The Civil War's Impact on Ordinary AmericansVirginia Tech History Professor Emeritus James Robertson talked about the Civil War's impact on ... Virginia Tech History Professor Emeritus James Robertson talked about the Civil War's impact on ordinary civilians and soldiers. He is the author of "Civil War Echoes: Voices from Virginia, 1860-1891" and many other award winning Civil War books. The Library of Virginia in Richmond, the American Civil War Museum and the University of Virginia Center for Civil War History co-hosted this talk as part of their annual Civil War symposium. 11:39 AM EDTApprox. 11 min.Hidden TownOld Salem was one of the first history sites in North America to begin interpreting the narrative ... Old Salem was one of the first history sites in North America to begin interpreting the narrative of enslaved African Americans. President Frank Vagnone explained how Old Salem is uncovering details about their lives through the Hidden Town Project. 11:50 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 12 min.Lectures in History Political Right Since the 1960sEmory University professor Joseph Crespino taught a class on the political right since the 1960s ... Emory University professor Joseph Crespino taught a class on the political right since the 1960s and explored how the Democratic South became solidly Republican. He focused on the "Southern Strategy," efforts by the Republican Party to appeal to conservative whites. He also talked about the economic growth of the Sun Belt region, states in the South and Southwest, and its impact on this political shift.
1:02 PM EDTApprox. 8 min.Origins of Salem CollegeSalem College is the oldest educational institution for girls in the United States. Michelle ... Salem College is the oldest educational institution for girls in the United States. Michelle Hopkins Lawrence, History Committee Co-Chair at Salem Academy & College, talked about the school's origins and 250 year history. 1:10 PM EDTApprox. 50 min.George Washington and the Early PresidencyPresidential historian Richard Norton Smith discussed how George Washington's vision for the ... Presidential historian Richard Norton Smith discussed how George Washington's vision for the American Republic shaped the role of president. Mr. Smith then talked about Founding Fathers John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe and their legacies as presidents. This talk was part of a series on the Founders hosted by the Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach, Florida. 2:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 58 min.American History in Winston-Salem, NC
3:58 PM EDTApprox. 24 min.Reel America Interviews with My Lai Veterans - 1970This 1970 Academy Award-winning short documentary recounts the events of March 16, 1968 in the ... This 1970 Academy Award-winning short documentary recounts the events of March 16, 1968 in the village of My Lai, Vietnam from the perspective of five Army veterans who were there. In graphic detail the men describe the situation before, during, and after the killing of between 347 (U.S. Army estimate) and 504 (Vietnamese government estimate) unarmed Vietnamese civilians. The veterans describe witnessing the killing of small children, elderly villagers, and the raping and killing of women, then reflect on how and why this and other massacres happened during the war. 4:22 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 38 min.Frederick Douglass BicentennialHistorian David Blight, director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance ... Historian David Blight, director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition presented a talk titled "Frederick Douglass at 200." Professor Blight discussed Douglass's life and work as an escaped slave, abolitionist, public speaker, and writer, as well as how we think about him now. The Maryland Historical Society hosted this event to mark the bicentennial of the birth of Frederick Douglass. 6:00 PM EDTApprox. 29 min.American Artifacts The Bible in America, 1492 -1776Museum of the Bible president Cary Summers and education presentation manager Norm Conrad gave a ... Museum of the Bible president Cary Summers and education presentation manager Norm Conrad gave a tour of the exhibit "The Impact of the Bible in America." In the first of a two-part program, they told the story of the bible's influence on America from 1492 through the beginning of the Revolutionary War.
6:29 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.1968 - America in Turmoil Vietnam WarThe major military, political and diplomatic developments in the Vietnam War during 1968 from the ... The major military, political and diplomatic developments in the Vietnam War during 1968 from the January Tet Offensive to the escalating body count and the undoing of Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency. Guests were Vietnam War veteran and former Navy secretary Jim Webb and David Maraniss, author of "They Marched Into Sunlight: War and Peace, Vietnam and America, October 1967." 7:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr.The Presidency George Washington's Literary LifeAuthor Kevin Hayes discussed George Washington's love of reading and how it influenced his ... Author Kevin Hayes discussed George Washington's love of reading and how it influenced his thinking on everything from military matters to gardening and religion. Washington was considered by many of his peers to be unrefined because he lacked a formal education. But Mr. Hayes argued that this view of the nation's first president was incorrect and that Washington engaged in a lifelong journey of self-education and improvement. This event took place at George Washington's Mount Vernon estate. 8:59 PM EDTApprox. 58 min.Oral Histories Susan Rothmann West Point InterviewSusan Rothmann talked about her experiences as a U.S. Army spouse, dealing with anti-war sentiment ... Susan Rothmann talked about her experiences as a U.S. Army spouse, dealing with anti-war sentiment while her husband fought in Vietnam, leading the Fort Campbell Family Readiness Group, and taking care of families following the 1985 Gander tragedy, when 248 American soldiers, most of them from the same division, died in a plane crash in Gander, Newfoundland. The interview is held by The West Point Center for Oral History.
9:57 PM EDTApprox. 33 min.American Artifacts The Bible in America, 1492 -1776Museum of the Bible president Cary Summers and education presentation manager Norm Conrad gave a ... Museum of the Bible president Cary Summers and education presentation manager Norm Conrad gave a tour of the exhibit "The Impact of the Bible in America." In the first of a two-part program, they told the story of the bible's influence on America from 1492 through the beginning of the Revolutionary War. 10:30 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.1968 - America in Turmoil Vietnam WarThe major military, political and diplomatic developments in the Vietnam War during 1968 from the ... The major military, political and diplomatic developments in the Vietnam War during 1968 from the January Tet Offensive to the escalating body count and the undoing of Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency. Guests were Vietnam War veteran and former Navy secretary Jim Webb and David Maraniss, author of "They Marched Into Sunlight: War and Peace, Vietnam and America, October 1967."
Monday, March 19
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 59 min.The Presidency George Washington's Literary LifeAuthor Kevin Hayes discussed George Washington's love of reading and how it influenced his ... Author Kevin Hayes discussed George Washington's love of reading and how it influenced his thinking on everything from military matters to gardening and religion. Washington was considered by many of his peers to be unrefined because he lacked a formal education. But Mr. Hayes argued that this view of the nation's first president was incorrect and that Washington engaged in a lifelong journey of self-education and improvement. This event took place at George Washington's Mount Vernon estate. 12:59 AM EDTApprox. 7 min.Preserving Happy HillDuring Reconstruction, African Americans in Winston settled in an area that became known as the ... During Reconstruction, African Americans in Winston settled in an area that became known as the Happy Hill neighborhood. Cheryl Harry, Organizer of the Happy Hill Shotgun House Project, explained her 30-year effort to preserve what's left of the community. 1:06 AM EDTApprox. 59 min.The Civil War The Civil War's Impact on Ordinary AmericansVirginia Tech History Professor Emeritus James Robertson talked about the Civil War's impact on ... Virginia Tech History Professor Emeritus James Robertson talked about the Civil War's impact on ordinary civilians and soldiers. He is the author of "Civil War Echoes: Voices from Virginia, 1860-1891" and many other award winning Civil War books. The Library of Virginia in Richmond, the American Civil War Museum and the University of Virginia Center for Civil War History co-hosted this talk as part of their annual Civil War symposium.
2:05 AM EDTApprox. 20 min.American Artifacts Museum of Early Southern Decorative ArtsThe Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts features furniture, paintings, textiles and ceramics ... The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts features furniture, paintings, textiles and ceramics made and used by people in the southern states. Curator Daniel Ackerman highlighted objects that help tell the history of the area from the colonial through the Antebellum era. 2:25 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Lectures in History Political Right Since the 1960sEmory University professor Joseph Crespino taught a class on the political right since the 1960s ... Emory University professor Joseph Crespino taught a class on the political right since the 1960s and explored how the Democratic South became solidly Republican. He focused on the "Southern Strategy," efforts by the Republican Party to appeal to conservative whites. He also talked about the economic growth of the Sun Belt region, states in the South and Southwest, and its impact on this political shift. 3:40 AM EDTApprox. 19 min.Why Is History Important?James Grossman, executive director of the American Historical Association, explained how the ... James Grossman, executive director of the American Historical Association, explained how the history field has changed in the past decade, and why he feels the study of history is important, especially in a polarized political environment. The interview was recorded at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C.
3:59 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 56 min.American History in Winston-Salem, NC 5:55 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 38 min.The Presidency Ulysses S. GrantCharles Calhoun reevaluated the 18th president. Mr. Calhoun is the author of "The Presidency of ... Charles Calhoun reevaluated the 18th president. Mr. Calhoun is the author of "The Presidency of Ulysses S. Grant." He explained why Grant was considered an unsuccessful chief executive by many early 20th century historians despite his domestic and foreign policy achievements. He argued that Grant was actually an influential president dogged by political enemies and scandal. The Smithsonian Associates hosted this program.