American History TV Schedule

Week of May 16 through May 23

All times and durations are subject to change

Saturday, May 19
8:00 AM EDTApprox. 25 min.Reel America Nuclear Attack Preparedness Procedures, Survive to Fight - 1968This 1968 U.S. Air Force training film dramatizes activities at a military base following a ... This 1968 U.S. Air Force training film dramatizes activities at a military base following a nuclear attack. This Cold War film outlines procedures for assessing damage, stabilizing and securing the base and communications, and offering medical treatment for radiation exposure. 8:25 AM EDTApprox. 15 min.National Voting Rights MuseumThe National Voting Rights Museum and Institute addresses the struggle of African Americans and ... The National Voting Rights Museum and Institute addresses the struggle of African Americans and women to obtain the right to vote. Historian Sam Walker toured the museum and discussed how Selma was integral to voting rights in 1965. 8:40 AM EDTApprox. 52 min.The Civil War Speeches and Writings of Frederick DouglassYale University professor David Blight talked about the political -- and often religious -- ... Yale University professor David Blight talked about the political -- and often religious -- rhetoric that Frederick Douglass used when writing or speaking about abolition and the Civil War. This talk was part of a conference hosted by the University of Virginia's Center for Civil War History.
9:32 AM EDTApprox. 28 min.The Civil War Notable Civil War LivesHistorians responded to audience questions about notable figures during the Civil War era. ... Historians responded to audience questions about notable figures during the Civil War era. Highlighted people included Confederate Gen. James Longstreet, abolitionist and Republican Party activist Anna Dickinson, and African American leader Frederick Douglass. This discussion was part of a conference hosted by the University of Virginia's Center for Civil War History. 10:00 AM EDTApprox. 30 min.American Artifacts World War I Soldiers and Art in the TrenchesAmerican History TV visited the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum to learn about stone ... American History TV visited the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum to learn about stone carvings left behind in bunkers and trenches by World War I soldiers and only recently rediscovered. Our guide was Dr. Jeff Gusky, whose photographs of the carvings are featured in the exhibit titled "Soldier Artists: Self-Expression in the Trenches." 10:30 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 25 min.Protests for Black CitizenshipThe Massachusetts Historical Society hosted a panel of four historians discussing the ways blacks ... The Massachusetts Historical Society hosted a panel of four historians discussing the ways blacks have protested for citizenship since the early days of the American Republic. Topics included abolitionists and self-proclaimed "colored freeman" in mid-19th century Boston, orators Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth, anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells, and the experiences of African American soldiers during World War One.
11:55 AM EDTApprox. 10 min.Selma's First African American MayorSelma's first African American mayor, James Perkins, Jr., discussed his political career and the ... Selma's first African American mayor, James Perkins, Jr., discussed his political career and the impact the Civil Rights Movement had on the city. 12:05 PM EDTApprox. 45 min.The Presidency Betty Ford CentennialFormer First Lady Betty Ford is remembered on the centennial of her birth. Hillary Clinton joined ... Former First Lady Betty Ford is remembered on the centennial of her birth. Hillary Clinton joined Lynda Johnson Robb, the daughter of President Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson, to talk about Mrs. Ford's White House years and her contributions to the causes of the Equal Rights Amendment and breast cancer prevention. NBC's Andrea Mitchell moderated this discussion, which was hosted by the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation. 12:50 PM EDTApprox. 16 min.The Vietnam WarHistorian Mark Philip Bradley of the University of Chicago explained why teaching the Vietnam War ... Historian Mark Philip Bradley of the University of Chicago explained why teaching the Vietnam War has changed, and he reflected on U.S.-Vietnam relations today. The interview was recorded at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C.
1:06 PM EDTApprox. 18 min.Old Cahawba Archaeological ParkCahawba, located just outside of Selma, was Alabama's first capital after achieving statehood in ... Cahawba, located just outside of Selma, was Alabama's first capital after achieving statehood in 1819. It became a thriving antebellum river town, until many of its wealthy residents left after the Civil War. Linda Derry, Site Director, toured Old Cahawba, which has become a ghost town, and visited what remains of several buildings original to the town. 1:24 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 16 min.Philadelphia and the Vietnam War in 1968A panel of historians looked back 50 years to 1968 and how Philadelphia and its citizens were ... A panel of historians looked back 50 years to 1968 and how Philadelphia and its citizens were impacted by the Vietnam War. This discussion was part of a conference co-hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova University. 2:40 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 20 min.1968 - Protests in Philadelphia, Germany & MexicoThree historians and a professor of Latin American studies talked about 1968 protests for civil ... Three historians and a professor of Latin American studies talked about 1968 protests for civil rights and social change in Philadelphia, Germany and Mexico. This program was a session from a day-long symposium titled: "1968: Philly and the World."
4:00 PM EDTApprox. 51 min.History Bookshelf Joseph Wheelan, Invading MexicoJoseph Wheelan explores the Mexican-American War of 1846 to 1848. The author chronicles President ... Joseph Wheelan explores the Mexican-American War of 1846 to 1848. The author chronicles President James Polk's desire to acquire California via war and the popular dissent that followed the start of the war by the likes of John Quincy Adams, Henry David Thoreau, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. The United States declared war on Mexico on May 13, 1846. What became known as "Mr. Polk's War" resulted in more than 500,000 square miles of new U.S. territory. Mr. Wheelan responded to questions from members of the audience. 4:51 PM EDTApprox. 18 min.Oral History with Selma Native Joyce Parrish O'NealSelma native Joyce Parrish O'Neal joined the final leg of the Selma to Montgomery March with her ... Selma native Joyce Parrish O'Neal joined the final leg of the Selma to Montgomery March with her mother and sister. She shared her stories of growing up as an African American in Selma prior to the 1965 Voting Rights Act. 5:09 PM EDTApprox. 18 min.Henry Kissinger's Foreign PolicyHenry Kissinger was secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. American History TV was at ... Henry Kissinger was secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. American History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California, where we spoke with professor Daniel Sargent of the University of California Berkeley about Kissinger's influence on U.S. foreign policy.
5:27 PM EDTApprox. 32 min.Voting Rights March in SelmaIn March of 1965, civil rights activists and religious leaders marched from Selma to Montgomery to ... In March of 1965, civil rights activists and religious leaders marched from Selma to Montgomery to demand African Americans be given the right to vote. National Park Service Guide April Baldwin visited several sites in Selma that were integral to the movement including the Dallas County Courthouse, Brown Chapel AME Church and the Edmund Pettus Bridge. 5:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 16 min.The Civil War Slavery and Reconstruction in the WestUniversity of Washington historian Quintard Taylor explored slavery, the abolition movement, and ... University of Washington historian Quintard Taylor explored slavery, the abolition movement, and Reconstruction in the West, focusing on Kansas and Missouri before and after the Civil War. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this talk. 7:15 PM EDTApprox. 20 min.Battle of SelmaDuring the Civil War, Selma served as one of the South's main military manufacturing centers. ... During the Civil War, Selma served as one of the South's main military manufacturing centers. Selma-Dallas County Museum of History & Archives, Immediate Past President Benny Austin shared the reasons why Union troops targeted Selma, which fell just days before the end of the Civil War.
7:35 PM EDTApprox. 24 min.Frank Rizzo and White Working-Class VotersIn this interview recorded at the Organization of American Historians annual meeting in ... In this interview recorded at the Organization of American Historians annual meeting in Sacramento, California, professor Timothy Lombardo of the University of South Alabama discussed former Philadelphia mayor Frank Rizzo, the concerns of white working-class voters in the 1970s, and made comparisons to today's political climate. 7:59 PM EDTApprox. 50 min.Lectures in History The South and National Culture in the 1970sEast Tennessee State University professor Tom Lee taught a class about the South's influence on ... East Tennessee State University professor Tom Lee taught a class about the South's influence on national culture in the 1970s. He highlighted the political importance of the region during Jimmy Carter's presidential campaign, noted the shift in migration to the South, and the rise of such things as NASCAR, country music and Southern Living magazine. 8:49 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 11 min.Philadelphia's Influence on Music in 1968A discussion on Philadelphia's influence on music in 1968. Panelists talk about the opening of the ... A discussion on Philadelphia's influence on music in 1968. Panelists talk about the opening of the Electric Factory, a concert venue that introduced rock 'n' roll to the city, bringing in artists such as Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova University co-hosted this event.
10:00 PM EDTApprox. 50 min.Reel America Columbia Revolt - 1968On April 23, 1968, several hundred Columbia University students gathered to protest the Vietnam ... On April 23, 1968, several hundred Columbia University students gathered to protest the Vietnam War and the university's plan to build a gym on a public park. After tearing down a construction fence and battling with police, the group occupied several campus buildings. Negotiations between the university and the students failed and, six days later, New York City police were called in. Protesters and bystanders were beaten and seven hundred were arrested. The New York Newsreel film collective documented these events from the student protesters' point of view, including scenes with access inside the occupied buildings, shots of police beating students, and negotiations with campus authorities. 10:50 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Philadelphia, Sports and Social Change in 1968This program was from a symposium titled "1968: Philly and The World." The discussion focused on ... This program was from a symposium titled "1968: Philly and The World." The discussion focused on the impact of local and international sports on social change and civil rights in 1968. Panelists talked about how collegiate and professional athletes used their platforms to advocate for equal treatment for all, especially women and African Americans. The Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova University and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania co-hosted this event.
Sunday, May 20
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 50 min.Lectures in History The South and National Culture in the 1970sEast Tennessee State University professor Tom Lee taught a class about the South's influence on ... East Tennessee State University professor Tom Lee taught a class about the South's influence on national culture in the 1970s. He highlighted the political importance of the region during Jimmy Carter's presidential campaign, noted the shift in migration to the South, and the rise of such things as NASCAR, country music and Southern Living magazine. 12:50 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Philadelphia's Influence on Music in 1968A discussion on Philadelphia's influence on music in 1968. Panelists talk about the opening of the ... A discussion on Philadelphia's influence on music in 1968. Panelists talk about the opening of the Electric Factory, a concert venue that introduced rock 'n' roll to the city, bringing in artists such as Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova University co-hosted this event. 2:00 AM EDTApprox. 51 min.History Bookshelf Joseph Wheelan, Invading MexicoJoseph Wheelan explores the Mexican-American War of 1846 to 1848. The author chronicles President ... Joseph Wheelan explores the Mexican-American War of 1846 to 1848. The author chronicles President James Polk's desire to acquire California via war and the popular dissent that followed the start of the war by the likes of John Quincy Adams, Henry David Thoreau, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. The United States declared war on Mexico on May 13, 1846. What became known as "Mr. Polk's War" resulted in more than 500,000 square miles of new U.S. territory. Mr. Wheelan responded to questions from members of the audience.
2:51 AM EDTApprox. 14 min.Edmund Pettus BridgeGen. Edmund Pettus, the namesake for the bridge at the beginning of the route from Selma to ... Gen. Edmund Pettus, the namesake for the bridge at the beginning of the route from Selma to Montgomery, was a Civil War General and two-term U.S. Senator from Alabama. John Giggie, University of Alabama professor, talked about the role the bridge played in Selma before and after the battle for civil rights. 3:05 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 34 min.Impact of Nuremberg and Tokyo War Crimes TrialsU.S. Court of Appeals Judge Evan Wallach talked about the history of the Nuremberg and Tokyo war ... U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Evan Wallach talked about the history of the Nuremberg and Tokyo war crime trials after World War II. He argued that these hearings impacted how evidence is used to determine and punish crimes of war. The Smithsonian Associates hosted this event. 4:39 AM EDTApprox. 44 min.Medal of Honor RecipientsThe Medal of Honor is the highest military award for valor during combat. Three recipients -- two ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military award for valor during combat. Three recipients -- two who received their medals for actions in the Vietnam War, and a third for his service in the Korean War -- reflected on their service at a conference hosted by the American Veterans Center.
5:23 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 16 min.Philadelphia and the Vietnam War in 1968A panel of historians looked back 50 years to 1968 and how Philadelphia and its citizens were ... A panel of historians looked back 50 years to 1968 and how Philadelphia and its citizens were impacted by the Vietnam War. This discussion was part of a conference co-hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova University. 6:39 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 19 min.1968 - Protests in Philadelphia, Germany & MexicoThree historians and a professor of Latin American studies talked about 1968 protests for civil ... Three historians and a professor of Latin American studies talked about 1968 protests for civil rights and social change in Philadelphia, Germany and Mexico. This program was a session from a day-long symposium titled: "1968: Philly and the World." 7:58 AM EDTApprox. 58 min.History Bookshelf S.C. Gwynne, Rebel YellS.C. Gwynne talked about his book, Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall ... S.C. Gwynne talked about his book, Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson, in which he recounts the life and military career of Confederate general Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson. In his book, the author reports that Jackson, a former physics professor, employed innovative military tactics that propelled him to fame during his two years in battle. S.C. Gwynne spoke at the Atlanta History Center.
8:56 AM EDTApprox. 7 min.Selma's First African American MayorSelma's first African American mayor, James Perkins, Jr., discussed his political career and the ... Selma's first African American mayor, James Perkins, Jr., discussed his political career and the impact the Civil Rights Movement had on the city. 9:03 AM EDTApprox. 57 min.Women Commanders and Trailblazers in the U.S. MilitaryTwo U.S. Marine Corps officers and a U.S. Coast Guard captain talked about their personal ... Two U.S. Marine Corps officers and a U.S. Coast Guard captain talked about their personal experiences as women in the armed services in a panel discussion titled, "Leading Military Women: Commanders and Trailblazers in the U.S. Military." All three of the women are combat veterans. The discussion was moderated by retired U.S. Army Brigadier General Anne Macdonald. 10:00 AM EDTApprox. 13 min.Oral Histories Witness to War Interviews on VietnamFounder and managing director of the Witness to War Foundation, Tom Beaty, described the combat ... Founder and managing director of the Witness to War Foundation, Tom Beaty, described the combat veteran interviews in their Vietnam War collection. He also discussed the foundation's mission and origins.
10:13 AM EDTApprox. 46 min.Oral Histories Charlie McMahon Interview on the Vietnam WarVietnam War veteran Charlie McMahon talked about his Marine Corps service, his chance meeting in ... Vietnam War veteran Charlie McMahon talked about his Marine Corps service, his chance meeting in Vietnam with journalist Catherine LeRoy, and his time with "CAP," the Combined Action Program which placed him in a village to live and work with the local Vietnamese. The Witness to War Foundation conducted the interview. 10:59 AM EDTApprox. 12 min.Old Live Oak CemeteryThe Old Live Oak Cemetery, founded in 1829, is the final resting place of many well-known ... The Old Live Oak Cemetery, founded in 1829, is the final resting place of many well-known Alabamians including the state's only Vice President William Rufus King, who also named the city of Selma. Historian Gery Anderson visited the final resting places of three members of Congress, including the first African American from Alabama, and the first woman elected to the state's legislature. 11:11 AM EDTApprox. 49 min.Lectures in History Agricultural Labor Since 1930 and Organic FarmingTulane University professor Jana Lipman taught a class on agricultural labor in the United States ... Tulane University professor Jana Lipman taught a class on agricultural labor in the United States since 1930 and the rise of organic farming. She described the "bracero" program which brought temporary workers from Mexico in the 1940s and 50s, as well as farm workers strikes under leaders such as César Chávez. She argued that despite the rise in consumer awareness relating to organic food, worker conditions are not always considered a factor in what people buy.
12:00 PM EDTApprox. 25 min.Voting Rights March in SelmaIn March of 1965, civil rights activists and religious leaders marched from Selma to Montgomery to ... In March of 1965, civil rights activists and religious leaders marched from Selma to Montgomery to demand African Americans be given the right to vote. National Park Service Guide April Baldwin visited several sites in Selma that were integral to the movement including the Dallas County Courthouse, Brown Chapel AME Church and the Edmund Pettus Bridge. 12:25 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.1st Infantry & Operation Desert StormArmy veteran Colonel Gregory Fontenot discussed his book, "The 1st Infantry Division and the U.S. ... Army veteran Colonel Gregory Fontenot discussed his book, "The 1st Infantry Division and the U.S. Army Transformed: Road to Victory in Desert Storm, 1970-1991." Colonel Fontenot focuses on the changes the division went through after the Vietnam War and how these innovations helped them engage and defeat at least a dozen Iraqi divisions, taking more than 14,000 prisoners during Operation Desert Storm in 1991. 1:30 PM EDTApprox. 2 hr. 5 min.American History TV Visits Selma, ALThe C-SPAN Citiies Tour visited Selma, Alabama to learn about the history of the city from local ... The C-SPAN Citiies Tour visited Selma, Alabama to learn about the history of the city from local experts and historians.
3:35 PM EDTApprox. 24 min.Why Is History Important?James Grossman, executive director of the American Historical Association, explained how the ... James Grossman, executive director of the American Historical Association, explained how the history field has changed in the past decade, and why he feels the study of history is important, especially in a polarized political environment. The interview was recorded at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C. 3:59 PM EDTApprox. 50 min.Reel America Columbia Revolt - 1968On April 23, 1968, several hundred Columbia University students gathered to protest the Vietnam ... On April 23, 1968, several hundred Columbia University students gathered to protest the Vietnam War and the university's plan to build a gym on a public park. After tearing down a construction fence and battling with police, the group occupied several campus buildings. Negotiations between the university and the students failed and, six days later, New York City police were called in. Protesters and bystanders were beaten and seven hundred were arrested. The New York Newsreel film collective documented these events from the student protesters' point of view, including scenes with access inside the occupied buildings, shots of police beating students, and negotiations with campus authorities. 4:49 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Philadelphia, Sports and Social Change in 1968This program was from a symposium titled "1968: Philly and The World." The discussion focused on ... This program was from a symposium titled "1968: Philly and The World." The discussion focused on the impact of local and international sports on social change and civil rights in 1968. Panelists talked about how collegiate and professional athletes used their platforms to advocate for equal treatment for all, especially women and African Americans. The Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova University and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania co-hosted this event.
5:59 PM EDTApprox. 22 min.Thomas Jefferson's Poplar ForestThomas Jefferson built Poplar Forest as a secluded retreat from public life. Travis McDonald, ... Thomas Jefferson built Poplar Forest as a secluded retreat from public life. Travis McDonald, Director of Architectural Restoration,talked about the site's history and goes behind the scenes of the current renovation project to show the historic trades of plastering and joinery. 6:21 PM EDTApprox. 17 min.Henry Kissinger's Foreign PolicyHenry Kissinger was secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. American History TV was at ... Henry Kissinger was secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. American History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California, where we spoke with professor Daniel Sargent of the University of California Berkeley about Kissinger's influence on U.S. foreign policy. 6:38 PM EDTApprox. 22 min.Oral History with Selma Native Joyce Parrish O'NealSelma native Joyce Parrish O'Neal joined the final leg of the Selma to Montgomery March with her ... Selma native Joyce Parrish O'Neal joined the final leg of the Selma to Montgomery March with her mother and sister. She shared her stories of growing up as an African American in Selma prior to the 1965 Voting Rights Act.
7:00 PM EDTApprox. 12 min.Oral Histories Witness to War Interviews on VietnamFounder and managing director of the Witness to War Foundation, Tom Beaty, described the combat ... Founder and managing director of the Witness to War Foundation, Tom Beaty, described the combat veteran interviews in their Vietnam War collection. He also discussed the foundation's mission and origins. 7:12 PM EDTApprox. 49 min.Oral Histories Charlie McMahon Interview on the Vietnam WarVietnam War veteran Charlie McMahon talked about his Marine Corps service, his chance meeting in ... Vietnam War veteran Charlie McMahon talked about his Marine Corps service, his chance meeting in Vietnam with journalist Catherine LeRoy, and his time with "CAP," the Combined Action Program which placed him in a village to live and work with the local Vietnamese. The Witness to War Foundation conducted the interview. 8:01 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 24 min.The Presidency Mary Ball Washington & Jane SpurginGeorge Washington's Mount Vernon hosted the annual Martha Washington Lecture, which highlights new ... George Washington's Mount Vernon hosted the annual Martha Washington Lecture, which highlights new thinking about her life and times. This year, the focus was on two 18th century women. Amherst College history professor Martha Saxton talked about George Washington's mother, Mary Ball Washington, and their complicated relationship. And then George Mason University history professor Cynthia Kierner discussed Jane Spurgin, who challenged the laws of the day regarding women's rights.
9:25 PM EDTApprox. 16 min.The Vietnam WarHistorian Mark Philip Bradley of the University of Chicago explained why teaching the Vietnam War ... Historian Mark Philip Bradley of the University of Chicago explained why teaching the Vietnam War has changed, and he reflected on U.S.-Vietnam relations today. The interview was recorded at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C. 9:41 PM EDTApprox. 14 min.Battle of SelmaDuring the Civil War, Selma served as one of the South's main military manufacturing centers. ... During the Civil War, Selma served as one of the South's main military manufacturing centers. Selma-Dallas County Museum of History & Archives, Immediate Past President Benny Austin shared the reasons why Union troops targeted Selma, which fell just days before the end of the Civil War. 9:55 PM EDTApprox. 24 min.Thomas Jefferson's Poplar ForestThomas Jefferson built Poplar Forest as a secluded retreat from public life. Travis McDonald, ... Thomas Jefferson built Poplar Forest as a secluded retreat from public life. Travis McDonald, Director of Architectural Restoration,talked about the site's history and goes behind the scenes of the current renovation project to show the historic trades of plastering and joinery.
10:19 PM EDTApprox. 17 min.Henry Kissinger's Foreign PolicyHenry Kissinger was secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. American History TV was at ... Henry Kissinger was secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. American History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California, where we spoke with professor Daniel Sargent of the University of California Berkeley about Kissinger's influence on U.S. foreign policy. 10:36 PM EDTApprox. 18 min.Old Cahawba Archaeological ParkCahawba, located just outside of Selma, was Alabama's first capital after achieving statehood in ... Cahawba, located just outside of Selma, was Alabama's first capital after achieving statehood in 1819. It became a thriving antebellum river town, until many of its wealthy residents left after the Civil War. Linda Derry, Site Director, toured Old Cahawba, which has become a ghost town, and visited what remains of several buildings original to the town. 10:54 PM EDTApprox. 13 min.Oral Histories Witness to War Interviews on VietnamFounder and managing director of the Witness to War Foundation, Tom Beaty, described the combat ... Founder and managing director of the Witness to War Foundation, Tom Beaty, described the combat veteran interviews in their Vietnam War collection. He also discussed the foundation's mission and origins.
11:07 PM EDTApprox. 53 min.Oral Histories Charlie McMahon Interview on the Vietnam WarVietnam War veteran Charlie McMahon talked about his Marine Corps service, his chance meeting in ... Vietnam War veteran Charlie McMahon talked about his Marine Corps service, his chance meeting in Vietnam with journalist Catherine LeRoy, and his time with "CAP," the Combined Action Program which placed him in a village to live and work with the local Vietnamese. The Witness to War Foundation conducted the interview.
Monday, May 21
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 29 min.The Presidency Mary Ball Washington & Jane SpurginGeorge Washington's Mount Vernon hosted the annual Martha Washington Lecture, which highlights new ... George Washington's Mount Vernon hosted the annual Martha Washington Lecture, which highlights new thinking about her life and times. This year, the focus was on two 18th century women. Amherst College history professor Martha Saxton talked about George Washington's mother, Mary Ball Washington, and their complicated relationship. And then George Mason University history professor Cynthia Kierner discussed Jane Spurgin, who challenged the laws of the day regarding women's rights. 1:29 AM EDTApprox. 16 min.The Vietnam WarHistorian Mark Philip Bradley of the University of Chicago explained why teaching the Vietnam War ... Historian Mark Philip Bradley of the University of Chicago explained why teaching the Vietnam War has changed, and he reflected on U.S.-Vietnam relations today. The interview was recorded at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C. 1:45 AM EDTApprox. 14 min.Selma's First African American MayorSelma's first African American mayor, James Perkins, Jr., discussed his political career and the ... Selma's first African American mayor, James Perkins, Jr., discussed his political career and the impact the Civil Rights Movement had on the city.
1:59 AM EDTApprox. 50 min.Reel America Columbia Revolt - 1968On April 23, 1968, several hundred Columbia University students gathered to protest the Vietnam ... On April 23, 1968, several hundred Columbia University students gathered to protest the Vietnam War and the university's plan to build a gym on a public park. After tearing down a construction fence and battling with police, the group occupied several campus buildings. Negotiations between the university and the students failed and, six days later, New York City police were called in. Protesters and bystanders were beaten and seven hundred were arrested. The New York Newsreel film collective documented these events from the student protesters' point of view, including scenes with access inside the occupied buildings, shots of police beating students, and negotiations with campus authorities. 2:49 AM EDTApprox. 20 min.Voting Rights March in SelmaIn March of 1965, civil rights activists and religious leaders marched from Selma to Montgomery to ... In March of 1965, civil rights activists and religious leaders marched from Selma to Montgomery to demand African Americans be given the right to vote. National Park Service Guide April Baldwin visited several sites in Selma that were integral to the movement including the Dallas County Courthouse, Brown Chapel AME Church and the Edmund Pettus Bridge. 3:09 AM EDTApprox. 20 min.Henry Kissinger's Foreign PolicyHenry Kissinger was secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. American History TV was at ... Henry Kissinger was secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. American History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California, where we spoke with professor Daniel Sargent of the University of California Berkeley about Kissinger's influence on U.S. foreign policy.
3:29 AM EDTApprox. 2 hr. 4 min.American History TV Visits Selma, ALThe C-SPAN Citiies Tour visited Selma, Alabama to learn about the history of the city from local ... The C-SPAN Citiies Tour visited Selma, Alabama to learn about the history of the city from local experts and historians. 5:33 AM EDTApprox. 20 min.Why Is History Important?James Grossman, executive director of the American Historical Association, explained how the ... James Grossman, executive director of the American Historical Association, explained how the history field has changed in the past decade, and why he feels the study of history is important, especially in a polarized political environment. The interview was recorded at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C. 5:53 AM EDTApprox. 4 min.Representative Terri Sewell on Selma History & EconomyRepresentative Terri Sewell (D-AL) discussed how Selma's history shaped her political career. Representative Terri Sewell (D-AL) discussed how Selma's history shaped her political career.
5:57 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell Satire CaseIn 1988, the Supreme Court announced its decision in Hustler Magazine v. Falwell. The court ruled ... In 1988, the Supreme Court announced its decision in Hustler Magazine v. Falwell. The court ruled unanimously for Hustler, which had published a cartoon parody of religious leader Jerry Falwell, who had sued to recover damages for libel, invasion of privacy, and emotional distress. This discussion of the landmark first amendment case included editorial cartoonists and a legal expert. It was part of a symposium on satire held at the University of Minnesota. 6:57 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 3 min.Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell Arguments & ImpactIn 1988, the Supreme Court announced its decision in Hustler Magazine v. Falwell. The court ruled ... In 1988, the Supreme Court announced its decision in Hustler Magazine v. Falwell. The court ruled unanimously for Hustler, which had published a cartoon parody of religious leader Jerry Falwell, who had sued to recover damages for libel, invasion of privacy, and emotional distress. This discussion of the landmark case focused on its significance and impact on editorial cartoonists and other First Amendment cases. This event was part of a symposium on satire held at the University of Minnesota.