American History TV Schedule

Week of July 12 through July 19

All times and durations are subject to change

Saturday, July 14
8:00 AM EDTApprox. 29 min.Reel America Why NATO? - 19581958 U.S. Army "Big Picture" film documenting the reasons for the creation of the North Atlantic ... 1958 U.S. Army "Big Picture" film documenting the reasons for the creation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Narrated by Edward R. Murrow, the report shows events following World War II that led to Soviet occupation of Eastern Europe, and the efforts of leaders, including General Dwight Eisenhower to organize NATO to defend Western Europe. 8:29 AM EDTApprox. 16 min.Integrating Department Store WorkforcesAfro-American Studies professor Traci Parker of the University of Massachusetts Amherst described ... Afro-American Studies professor Traci Parker of the University of Massachusetts Amherst described the challenges African American department store workers and shoppers faced in the 1950s and '60s, and the efforts made to integrate the workforce. The interview was recorded at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California. 8:45 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 4 min.Habeas Corpus - From 17th Century England to TodayAuthor and Berkeley law professor Amanda Tyler discussed her book "Habeas Corpus in Wartime: From ... Author and Berkeley law professor Amanda Tyler discussed her book "Habeas Corpus in Wartime: From the Tower of London to Guantanamo Bay." Professor Tyler also explored how the English roots of Habeas Corpus connect to America today.
9:49 AM EDTApprox. 6 min.Tour of LubbockTour the city of Lubbock with Mayor Dan Pope, as he took our cameras through the city to highlight ... Tour the city of Lubbock with Mayor Dan Pope, as he took our cameras through the city to highlight some of its unique locations. 9:55 AM EDTApprox. 20 min.American Artifacts Cars in America - 1930s to 1980sIn the second of a two-part program, we toured the "Driving America" exhibit at The Henry Ford ... In the second of a two-part program, we toured the "Driving America" exhibit at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. Transportation curator Matt Anderson showed us a 1931 Bugatti and described how auto manufacturing changed during World War II. We also learned how vehicles evolved based on customer preference and available technology. 10:15 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 45 min.Photographing the PresidentsThree former White House photographers talked about their work with Presidents George W. Bush, ... Three former White House photographers talked about their work with Presidents George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. Sharon Farmer, Eric Draper and Lawrence Jackson shared photographs showing these presidents in their public and private moments. We also see first families and White House staff, and hear the stories behind each scene. The Annenberg Space for Photography hosted the event.
12:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.The Presidency White House History & DesignWe heard from a panel of experts about the design history of the White House -- and what changes, ... We heard from a panel of experts about the design history of the White House -- and what changes, if any, the future may hold. Panelists included architecture professors from the United Kingdom and Ireland as well as White House historians. This program was part of a day-long symposium hosted by the White House Historical Association and focused on the history of British and Irish connections with the White House. 1:05 PM EDTApprox. 54 min.House Energy & Commerce Committee TributeThe United States Capitol Historical Society hosted its annual tribute to an outstanding committee ... The United States Capitol Historical Society hosted its annual tribute to an outstanding committee of the House or Senate. This year, they honored the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Current and former committee chairs gathered in the U.S. Capitol's Statuary Hall and recalled their work on the the committee. 1:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 51 min.President Reagan's Cold War StrategyA panel discussion from the Heritage Foundation on President Ronald Reagan's Cold War strategy, ... A panel discussion from the Heritage Foundation on President Ronald Reagan's Cold War strategy, with a focus on how his "peace through strength" philosophy helped reduce strategic nuclear warheads in the United States and the Soviet Union. Due to technical difficulties, we join the program a few minutes after it started.
3:50 PM EDTApprox. 10 min.West Texas AgricultureLocated in Lubbock, the Bayer Museum of Agriculture highlights the importance of the cotton ... Located in Lubbock, the Bayer Museum of Agriculture highlights the importance of the cotton industry to the state of Texas. Dan Taylor, president, talked about how cotton farming has changed over the years. 4:00 PM EDTApprox. 50 min.History Bookshelf John Sedgwick, War of TwoJohn Sedgwick talked about his book War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that ... John Sedgwick talked about his book War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that Stunned the Nation, in which he examines the rivalry between Alexander Hamilton and Vice President Aaron Burr, which resulted in a duel that claimed Hamilton's life. 4:50 PM EDTApprox. 10 min.Windmills and Settlement of the WestThe American Windmill Museum tells visitors about the role the windmill played in the settlement ... The American Windmill Museum tells visitors about the role the windmill played in the settlement of the Western U.S. The museum and the surrounding grounds exhibit over 200 restored windmill structures. Tanya Meadow shared the history and highlighted some of the windmills that are on display.
5:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr.World War I in the Middle EastU.S. Army Command & General Staff College professor Brian Steed talked about the impact of World ... U.S. Army Command & General Staff College professor Brian Steed talked about the impact of World War I on the Middle East and how the outcome of the war continues to play a role in present-day conflicts. He explored the defeat and dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, which was the dominant power in the region, and how their former territories were allocated. The National World War I Museum & Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri hosted this event. 6:00 PM EDTApprox. 54 min.The Civil War Diary of LeRoy Wiley Gresham, 1860-65Janet Croon talked about the book "The War Outside My Window: The Civil War Diary of LeRoy Wiley ... Janet Croon talked about the book "The War Outside My Window: The Civil War Diary of LeRoy Wiley Gresham." Gresham was a 12-year-old boy from a wealthy slave-holding family in Georgia when he began keeping a diary right as the secession crisis began to unfold and the Civil War got underway. He continued to keep a diary and capture a civilian perspective on events through many personal health issues until 1865 when the war ended and he succumbed to his ailments. The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum in Atlanta hosted this talk. 6:54 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 6 min.The Tomb of the Unknown SoldierMilitary historian Patrick O'Donnell talked about his book "The Unknowns: The Untold Story of ... Military historian Patrick O'Donnell talked about his book "The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home." He chronicled the combat stories of the eight men who were selected to escort the unknown soldier's remains. The National Archives hosted this event.
8:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 19 min.Lectures in History Historical Interpretations of ReconstructionUniversity of Connecticut professor Manisha Sinha taught a class about the Reconstruction Era ... University of Connecticut professor Manisha Sinha taught a class about the Reconstruction Era after the Civil War. She outlined the different ways historians have interpreted this period - either as a success for the rights granted under the new constitutional amendments, or as a failure since it did not achieve equality for African Americans. 9:19 PM EDTApprox. 41 min.Saving Private Ryan & National World War II MuseumIn 1998, the Academy Award-winning World War II film "Saving Private Ryan" was released in ... In 1998, the Academy Award-winning World War II film "Saving Private Ryan" was released in theaters. The movie portrayed the 1944 D-Day invasion of Normandy and the mission to find a soldier behind enemy lines. Former National World War II Museum president & CEO Nick Mueller talked about the museum's connection to the film, and shared stories about historian Stephen Ambrose, a consultant on "Saving Private Ryan" and the museum's early founder. He also talked about the reaction of historians and military leaders to the film and explored its legacy today. The event was part of a symposium held at the National World War II museum to mark the 20th anniversary of the film's release. 10:00 PM EDTApprox. 18 min.Reel America L'Effort Americain - 1918 French Silent FilmHistorian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary ... Historian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary for a silent French film dedicated to the U.S. forces that joined the Allies in 1917.
10:18 PM EDTApprox. 11 min.Reel America The St. Mihiel Drive - 1918 U.S. Army Silent FilmHistorian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary ... Historian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary for a silent U.S. Army film documenting a September 1918 American offensive. 10:29 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 31 min.Citizen Protest Movements & CongressCurrent and former members of congress and a student and teacher who were present during the ... Current and former members of congress and a student and teacher who were present during the school shooting at Marjory Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida discussed citizen movements and their influence on policymakers. The panel compared the 1960s civil rights movement with more recent protests and they discussed the tragedy at Parkland High School and the movement that followed.
Sunday, July 15
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 20 min.Lectures in History Historical Interpretations of ReconstructionUniversity of Connecticut professor Manisha Sinha taught a class about the Reconstruction Era ... University of Connecticut professor Manisha Sinha taught a class about the Reconstruction Era after the Civil War. She outlined the different ways historians have interpreted this period - either as a success for the rights granted under the new constitutional amendments, or as a failure since it did not achieve equality for African Americans. 1:20 AM EDTApprox. 40 min.Saving Private Ryan & National World War II MuseumIn 1998, the Academy Award-winning World War II film "Saving Private Ryan" was released in ... In 1998, the Academy Award-winning World War II film "Saving Private Ryan" was released in theaters. The movie portrayed the 1944 D-Day invasion of Normandy and the mission to find a soldier behind enemy lines. Former National World War II Museum president & CEO Nick Mueller talked about the museum's connection to the film, and shared stories about historian Stephen Ambrose, a consultant on "Saving Private Ryan" and the museum's early founder. He also talked about the reaction of historians and military leaders to the film and explored its legacy today. The event was part of a symposium held at the National World War II museum to mark the 20th anniversary of the film's release. 2:00 AM EDTApprox. 50 min.History Bookshelf John Sedgwick, War of TwoJohn Sedgwick talked about his book War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that ... John Sedgwick talked about his book War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that Stunned the Nation, in which he examines the rivalry between Alexander Hamilton and Vice President Aaron Burr, which resulted in a duel that claimed Hamilton's life.
2:50 AM EDTApprox. 10 min.Windmills and Settlement of the WestThe American Windmill Museum tells visitors about the role the windmill played in the settlement ... The American Windmill Museum tells visitors about the role the windmill played in the settlement of the Western U.S. The museum and the surrounding grounds exhibit over 200 restored windmill structures. Tanya Meadow shared the history and highlighted some of the windmills that are on display. 3:00 AM EDTApprox. 59 min.World War I in the Middle EastU.S. Army Command & General Staff College professor Brian Steed talked about the impact of World ... U.S. Army Command & General Staff College professor Brian Steed talked about the impact of World War I on the Middle East and how the outcome of the war continues to play a role in present-day conflicts. He explored the defeat and dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, which was the dominant power in the region, and how their former territories were allocated. The National World War I Museum & Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri hosted this event. 3:59 AM EDTApprox. 56 min.The Civil War Diary of LeRoy Wiley Gresham, 1860-65Janet Croon talked about the book "The War Outside My Window: The Civil War Diary of LeRoy Wiley ... Janet Croon talked about the book "The War Outside My Window: The Civil War Diary of LeRoy Wiley Gresham." Gresham was a 12-year-old boy from a wealthy slave-holding family in Georgia when he began keeping a diary right as the secession crisis began to unfold and the Civil War got underway. He continued to keep a diary and capture a civilian perspective on events through many personal health issues until 1865 when the war ended and he succumbed to his ailments. The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum in Atlanta hosted this talk.
4:55 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 4 min.The Tomb of the Unknown SoldierMilitary historian Patrick O'Donnell talked about his book "The Unknowns: The Untold Story of ... Military historian Patrick O'Donnell talked about his book "The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home." He chronicled the combat stories of the eight men who were selected to escort the unknown soldier's remains. The National Archives hosted this event. 5:59 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 50 min.President Reagan's Cold War StrategyA panel discussion from the Heritage Foundation on President Ronald Reagan's Cold War strategy, ... A panel discussion from the Heritage Foundation on President Ronald Reagan's Cold War strategy, with a focus on how his "peace through strength" philosophy helped reduce strategic nuclear warheads in the United States and the Soviet Union. Due to technical difficulties, we join the program a few minutes after it started. 7:49 AM EDTApprox. 11 min.West Texas AgricultureLocated in Lubbock, the Bayer Museum of Agriculture highlights the importance of the cotton ... Located in Lubbock, the Bayer Museum of Agriculture highlights the importance of the cotton industry to the state of Texas. Dan Taylor, president, talked about how cotton farming has changed over the years.
8:00 AM EDTApprox. 54 min.History Bookshelf Danielle Allen, Our DeclarationDanielle Allen talked about her book Our Declaration: A Reading of the Declaration of Independence ... Danielle Allen talked about her book Our Declaration: A Reading of the Declaration of Independence in Defense of Equality, in which she talks about the Declaration of Independence. She spoke in the History Pavilion of the 15th annual National Book Festival, held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. 8:54 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 6 min.World War I & the Tomb of the Unknown SoldierRetired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Gavin McIlvenna talked about the creation of the Tomb of the ... Retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Gavin McIlvenna talked about the creation of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery following World War I. A former guard at the tomb, and founder and president of the Society of the Honor Guard, he also describes the changing of the guard ceremony and reflects on the meaning of the monument. The National World War I Museum and Memorial hosted the event. 10:00 AM EDTApprox. 59 min.The Civil War Robert E. Lee's Treason & War Crimes IndictmentAuthor and historian John Reeves discussed his book, "The Lost Indictment of Robert E. Lee," which ... Author and historian John Reeves discussed his book, "The Lost Indictment of Robert E. Lee," which recounts the June 1865 indictment against the General Lee and other Confederate leaders for treason and war crimes. The document went missing for 72 years, and Lee and other Confederates eventually received amnesty from President Andrew Johnson. But Reeves contended the indictment's disappearance is symbolic of how Americans quickly forget the legal and moral case against Lee, and he soon became widely viewed as an American hero, with admirers in the South and North. The National Archives in Washington, DC hosted this talk.
10:59 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 3 min.Burr-Hamilton Duel & The Society of the CincinnatiHistorian, author, and South Carolina Society of the Cincinnati member C.L. Bragg discussed how ... Historian, author, and South Carolina Society of the Cincinnati member C.L. Bragg discussed how members of the society reacted to the deadly Burr-Hamilton duel at the time, and how the event shifted the public's perspective on duels in general. When Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr met for their famous duel in Weehawken, New Jersey on July 11, 1804, both men were members of the Society of the Cincinnati. 12:02 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 48 min.Lectures in History Tet Offensive to Vietnam War's EndU.S. Army Command and General Staff College professor Richard Faulkner taught a class on the ... U.S. Army Command and General Staff College professor Richard Faulkner taught a class on the Vietnam War, focusing on the Tet Offensive in 1968 though the U.S. withdrawal in the early 1970s. He described how military objectives, domestic politics, and public opinion changed because of the Tet campaign. He also talked about Richard Nixon's victory in the 1968 presidential election, and how this resulted in a gradual removal of U.S. troops and a shift in responsibility to the South Vietnamese government for fighting the war. 1:50 PM EDTApprox. 9 min.American Artifacts Quentin Roosevelt MemorialU.S. Army Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, was shot down and ... U.S. Army Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, was shot down and killed near the village of Chamery, France during World War I. American History TV visited a memorial fountain in the village with historian Mitchell Yockelson to learn about the death of the young aviator on July 14, 1918.
1:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 41 min.D-Day FilmsIn 1998, the Academy Award-winning World War II film "Saving Private Ryan" was released in ... In 1998, the Academy Award-winning World War II film "Saving Private Ryan" was released in theaters. The movie portrayed the 1944 D-Day invasion of Normandy and the mission to find a soldier behind enemy lines. At a symposium held at the National World War II Museum to mark the 20th anniversary of the film's release, historians explored and contrasted other D-Day films and talked about the directors' process of creating them. 3:40 PM EDTApprox. 20 min.Spanish Missions & California's Native PeopleUniversity of California Santa Cruz history professor Lisbeth Haas described the impact of the ... University of California Santa Cruz history professor Lisbeth Haas described the impact of the Spanish missions on the native California people in the late 1700s. We spoke with her at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California. 4:00 PM EDTApprox. 18 min.Reel America L'Effort Americain - 1918 French Silent FilmHistorian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary ... Historian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary for a silent French film dedicated to the U.S. forces that joined the Allies in 1917.
4:18 PM EDTApprox. 12 min.Reel America The St. Mihiel Drive - 1918 U.S. Army Silent FilmHistorian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary ... Historian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary for a silent U.S. Army film documenting a September 1918 American offensive. 4:30 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.Citizen Protest Movements & CongressCurrent and former members of congress and a student and teacher who were present during the ... Current and former members of congress and a student and teacher who were present during the school shooting at Marjory Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida discussed citizen movements and their influence on policymakers. The panel compared the 1960s civil rights movement with more recent protests and they discussed the tragedy at Parkland High School and the movement that followed. 6:00 PM EDTApprox. 19 min.American Artifacts French World War I SoldiersTwo U.S. Army veterans portrayed French World War I soldiers in a mock trench. Wearing uniforms ... Two U.S. Army veterans portrayed French World War I soldiers in a mock trench. Wearing uniforms and gear from the last two years of the conflict, the soldiers discussed the French experience in the Great War. They were participants in a living history event hosted each year by the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.
6:19 PM EDTApprox. 10 min.American Artifacts Quentin Roosevelt MemorialU.S. Army Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, was shot down and ... U.S. Army Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, was shot down and killed near the village of Chamery, France during World War I. American History TV visited a memorial fountain in the village with historian Mitchell Yockelson to learn about the death of the young aviator on July 14, 1918. 6:29 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Founding of Capitol HillThis event was a book launch and discussion with the three co-authors, editor, and mapmaker of the ... This event was a book launch and discussion with the three co-authors, editor, and mapmaker of the book, "Creating Capitol Hill: Place, Proprietors, and People." Published by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, the book details how the District of Columbia was chosen, how the land was purchased, and how the neighborhood and city developed in the early years of the republic. The event also included a talk by Mount Vernon's Dean Malissa portraying George Washington, who was instrumental in locating and founding the U.S. Capitol. 7:44 PM EDTApprox. 15 min.Spanish Missions & California's Native PeopleUniversity of California Santa Cruz history professor Lisbeth Haas described the impact of the ... University of California Santa Cruz history professor Lisbeth Haas described the impact of the Spanish missions on the native California people in the late 1700s. We spoke with her at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California.
7:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.The Presidency President Nixon's Drug Abuse InitiativesIn this program, a panel of Nixon-era officials revisited the administration's drug abuse ... In this program, a panel of Nixon-era officials revisited the administration's drug abuse initiatives in the early 1970s. They discussed treatment approaches, law enforcement strategies and even President Nixon's famous meeting wtih Elvis Presley - who offered his own assistance in the drug fight. The National Archives and the Richard Nixon Foundation co-hosted this event. 9:29 PM EDTApprox. 21 min.Radio & World War II-Era PoliticsWofford College history professor Mark Byrnes talked about the influence of radio on World War ... Wofford College history professor Mark Byrnes talked about the influence of radio on World War II-era politics in this interview recorded at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California. 9:50 PM EDTApprox. 10 min.Integrating Department Store WorkforcesAfro-American Studies professor Traci Parker of the University of Massachusetts Amherst described ... Afro-American Studies professor Traci Parker of the University of Massachusetts Amherst described the challenges African American department store workers and shoppers faced in the 1950s and '60s, and the efforts made to integrate the workforce. The interview was recorded at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California.
10:00 PM EDTApprox. 19 min.American Artifacts French World War I SoldiersTwo U.S. Army veterans portrayed French World War I soldiers in a mock trench. Wearing uniforms ... Two U.S. Army veterans portrayed French World War I soldiers in a mock trench. Wearing uniforms and gear from the last two years of the conflict, the soldiers discussed the French experience in the Great War. They were participants in a living history event hosted each year by the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 10:19 PM EDTApprox. 11 min.American Artifacts Quentin Roosevelt MemorialU.S. Army Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, was shot down and ... U.S. Army Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, was shot down and killed near the village of Chamery, France during World War I. American History TV visited a memorial fountain in the village with historian Mitchell Yockelson to learn about the death of the young aviator on July 14, 1918. 10:30 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Founding of Capitol HillThis event was a book launch and discussion with the three co-authors, editor, and mapmaker of the ... This event was a book launch and discussion with the three co-authors, editor, and mapmaker of the book, "Creating Capitol Hill: Place, Proprietors, and People." Published by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, the book details how the District of Columbia was chosen, how the land was purchased, and how the neighborhood and city developed in the early years of the republic. The event also included a talk by Mount Vernon's Dean Malissa portraying George Washington, who was instrumental in locating and founding the U.S. Capitol.
11:45 PM EDTApprox. 15 min.Spanish Missions & California's Native PeopleUniversity of California Santa Cruz history professor Lisbeth Haas described the impact of the ... University of California Santa Cruz history professor Lisbeth Haas described the impact of the Spanish missions on the native California people in the late 1700s. We spoke with her at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California.
Monday, July 16
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.The Presidency President Nixon's Drug Abuse InitiativesIn this program, a panel of Nixon-era officials revisited the administration's drug abuse ... In this program, a panel of Nixon-era officials revisited the administration's drug abuse initiatives in the early 1970s. They discussed treatment approaches, law enforcement strategies and even President Nixon's famous meeting wtih Elvis Presley - who offered his own assistance in the drug fight. The National Archives and the Richard Nixon Foundation co-hosted this event. 1:30 AM EDTApprox. 30 min.Reel America Why NATO? - 19581958 U.S. Army "Big Picture" film documenting the reasons for the creation of the North Atlantic ... 1958 U.S. Army "Big Picture" film documenting the reasons for the creation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Narrated by Edward R. Murrow, the report shows events following World War II that led to Soviet occupation of Eastern Europe, and the efforts of leaders, including General Dwight Eisenhower to organize NATO to defend Western Europe. 2:00 AM EDTApprox. 17 min.Reel America L'Effort Americain - 1918 French Silent FilmHistorian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary ... Historian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary for a silent French film dedicated to the U.S. forces that joined the Allies in 1917.
2:17 AM EDTApprox. 13 min.Reel America The St. Mihiel Drive - 1918 U.S. Army Silent FilmHistorian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary ... Historian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary for a silent U.S. Army film documenting a September 1918 American offensive. 2:30 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.Citizen Protest Movements & CongressCurrent and former members of congress and a student and teacher who were present during the ... Current and former members of congress and a student and teacher who were present during the school shooting at Marjory Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida discussed citizen movements and their influence on policymakers. The panel compared the 1960s civil rights movement with more recent protests and they discussed the tragedy at Parkland High School and the movement that followed. 4:00 AM EDTApprox. 19 min.American Artifacts French World War I SoldiersTwo U.S. Army veterans portrayed French World War I soldiers in a mock trench. Wearing uniforms ... Two U.S. Army veterans portrayed French World War I soldiers in a mock trench. Wearing uniforms and gear from the last two years of the conflict, the soldiers discussed the French experience in the Great War. They were participants in a living history event hosted each year by the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.
4:19 AM EDTApprox. 11 min.American Artifacts Quentin Roosevelt MemorialU.S. Army Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, was shot down and ... U.S. Army Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, was shot down and killed near the village of Chamery, France during World War I. American History TV visited a memorial fountain in the village with historian Mitchell Yockelson to learn about the death of the young aviator on July 14, 1918. 4:30 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Founding of Capitol HillThis event was a book launch and discussion with the three co-authors, editor, and mapmaker of the ... This event was a book launch and discussion with the three co-authors, editor, and mapmaker of the book, "Creating Capitol Hill: Place, Proprietors, and People." Published by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, the book details how the District of Columbia was chosen, how the land was purchased, and how the neighborhood and city developed in the early years of the republic. The event also included a talk by Mount Vernon's Dean Malissa portraying George Washington, who was instrumental in locating and founding the U.S. Capitol. 5:45 AM EDTApprox. 15 min.Integrating Department Store WorkforcesAfro-American Studies professor Traci Parker of the University of Massachusetts Amherst described ... Afro-American Studies professor Traci Parker of the University of Massachusetts Amherst described the challenges African American department store workers and shoppers faced in the 1950s and '60s, and the efforts made to integrate the workforce. The interview was recorded at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California.
6:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 42 min.D-Day FilmsIn 1998, the Academy Award-winning World War II film "Saving Private Ryan" was released in ... In 1998, the Academy Award-winning World War II film "Saving Private Ryan" was released in theaters. The movie portrayed the 1944 D-Day invasion of Normandy and the mission to find a soldier behind enemy lines. At a symposium held at the National World War II Museum to mark the 20th anniversary of the film's release, historians explored and contrasted other D-Day films and talked about the directors' process of creating them. 7:42 AM EDTApprox. 18 min.Spanish Missions & California's Native PeopleUniversity of California Santa Cruz history professor Lisbeth Haas described the impact of the ... University of California Santa Cruz history professor Lisbeth Haas described the impact of the Spanish missions on the native California people in the late 1700s. We spoke with her at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California.