American History TV Schedule

Week of August 11 through August 18

All times and durations are subject to change

Saturday, August 11
8:00 AM EDTApprox. 35 min.Reel America Japanese Bride in America - 1952Told through the voices of an American soldier stationed in Japan and a Japanese woman who he ... Told through the voices of an American soldier stationed in Japan and a Japanese woman who he marries in 1947, this film shows how the newlywed couple returns to his hometown of Cleveland and adapts to the community. After the end of World War II, thousands of American servicemen who were part of the occupying force married Japanese women and returned to the United States with their wives. 8:35 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.U.S. & Russia - March 1917Journalist and author Will Englund discussed his book "March 1917: On the Brink of War and ... Journalist and author Will Englund discussed his book "March 1917: On the Brink of War and Revolution." Mr. Englund details the turmoil and opposition to World War I in Russia that forced Czar Nicholas II to abdicate his throne that month, and the pressure facing President Woodrow Wilson to enter the Great War after he campaigned for reelection on the slogan: "he kept us out of war." Will Englund also talked about the continuing legacy of these events in the twenty-first century. 9:45 AM EDTApprox. 15 min.Reel America The St. Mihiel Drive - 1918 U.S. Army Silent FilmHistorian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary ... Historian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I expert Guillaume Moizan provided commentary for a silent U.S. Army film documenting a September 1918 American offensive.
10:00 AM EDTApprox. 30 min.American Artifacts American World War I SoldiersMichael McCloskey, a reenactor portraying a World War I American soldier discussed his equipment, ... Michael McCloskey, a reenactor portraying a World War I American soldier discussed his equipment, the life of the common soldier, and U.S. participation in the Great War. Mr. McCloskey is a history professor at Harrisburg Community College, Gettysburg campus and was a participant in a living history event hosted each year by the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 10:30 AM EDTApprox. 50 min.The Presidency Remembering President James GarfieldThis was a discussion about the complicated and controversial building of a memorial to President ... This was a discussion about the complicated and controversial building of a memorial to President James Garfield on the U.S. Capitol grounds. We heard from Matthew Gilmore who edits a Washington, D.C. history blog. Mr. Garfield was shot in July 1881 by a disgruntled office seeker and died from his wounds the following September. The United States Capitol Historical Society hosted this event. 11:20 AM EDTApprox. 45 min.The Presidency Bess & Harry TrumanHarry S. Truman Presidential Library archivist Tammy Williams talked about Harry and Bess Truman, ... Harry S. Truman Presidential Library archivist Tammy Williams talked about Harry and Bess Truman, and their life together from childhood in Independence, Missouri to the White House. She read from their love letters and discussed their 53-year marriage. The Truman library hosted this event.
12:05 PM EDTApprox. 11 min.Oral Histories House Historian Interviews with Women in CongressU.S. House of Representatives historian Matthew Wasniewski and oral history manager Kathleen ... U.S. House of Representatives historian Matthew Wasniewski and oral history manager Kathleen Johnson talked with us about their interviews with former congresswomen. They also talked about their online exhibit that celebrates a century of women in Congress, starting with Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress in 1916. 12:16 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 49 min.Oral Histories Women in Congress - Susan Molinari InterviewFormer U.S. Representative Susan Molinari served from 1990 to 1997 as a Republican from New York. ... Former U.S. Representative Susan Molinari served from 1990 to 1997 as a Republican from New York. In this interview she talked about her experience as the daughter of Congressman Guy Molinari, as the keynote speaker at the 1996 Republican National Convention, as vice chair of the Republican Conference, and her marriage to a fellow member of Congress. The U.S. House of Representatives Office of the Historian conducted the interview. 2:05 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 45 min.Oral Histories Women in Congress - Pat Schroeder InterviewPat Schroeder served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1973 to 1997 as a Democrat from ... Pat Schroeder served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1973 to 1997 as a Democrat from Colorado. When elected, she was one of only fourteen congresswomen. In this interview she talked about balancing work with raising a family, her assignment to the House Armed Services Committee and her experience as one of the founding members of the Congresswomen's Caucus. The U.S. House of Representatives Office of the Historian conducted this interview.
3:50 PM EDTApprox. 10 min.FDR Home Movie CollectionIn a phone interview, Paul Sparrow talked about the release of a silent film collection showing ... In a phone interview, Paul Sparrow talked about the release of a silent film collection showing Franklin D. Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt in informal settings with family and close friends. Mr. Sparrow is the director of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library. The films were taken by longtime FDR confidante and secretary Missy LeHand during the 1930s. 4:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr.History Bookshelf Diana Preston, Before the FalloutDiana Preston talked about her book, "Before The Fallout: From Marie Curie to Hiroshima," ... Diana Preston talked about her book, "Before The Fallout: From Marie Curie to Hiroshima," published by Walker and Company. On December 26, 1898, Marie Curie announced the discovery of radium and observed that "radioactivity seems to be an atomic property." A mere 47 years later, "Little Boy" exploded over Hiroshima. She told the story of the intervening half century, during which a quest to unravel the secrets of the material world revealed how to destroy it, and an open, international, scientific investigation changed into a secret wartime race for the bomb. After her presentation, Ms. Preston answered audience members' questions. 5:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr.1968 Poor People's Campaign OrganizersFormer staffer to Robert F. Kennedy, Peter Edelman, and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee ... Former staffer to Robert F. Kennedy, Peter Edelman, and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee founding member, Bernard Lafayette, sat down at the National Museum of African American History & Culture to discuss the originators of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.
6:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 1 min.The Civil War Union Troops & PornographyVillanova University history professor Judith Giesberg talked about Union soldiers and pornography ... Villanova University history professor Judith Giesberg talked about Union soldiers and pornography during the Civil War. Professor Giesberg is author the book "Sex and the Civil War." This talk was part of the annual summer conference hosted by the Gettysburg College Civil War Institute. Note: some viewers may find images in this program offensive. 7:01 PM EDTApprox. 59 min.Green Berets at Vietnam's A Shau ValleyMedal of Honor recipient Bennie Adkins was interviewed by the co-author of his book "A Tiger among ... Medal of Honor recipient Bennie Adkins was interviewed by the co-author of his book "A Tiger among Us: A Story of Valor in Vietnam's A Shau Valley" Sergeant Adkins described how he and sixteen of his fellow Green Berets were attacked by a large force of North Vietnamese and Vietcong troops from March 9 to March 12, 1966, and he also told the story of a tiger that saved his life during the battle. On September 15, 2014, President Barack Obama awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor to Bennie Adkins for his actions during combat in Vietnam's A Shau Valley. 8:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 32 min.1968 - America in Turmoil Women's RightsWomen protesting the 1968 Miss America pageant challenged not only the beauty contest but ... Women protesting the 1968 Miss America pageant challenged not only the beauty contest but long-held assumptions about American womanhood when they hung a bed sheet inside the Atlantic City convention hall declaring "Women's Liberation." Women's rights became part of the national conversation, transforming households and workplaces across the country and society itself. Our guests were Debora Spar, former Barnard College president and author of "Wonder Women: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection," and Mona Charen, a syndicated columnist and senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C. She is the author of the upcoming book "Sex Matters: How Modern Feminism Lost Touch with Science, Love, and Common Sense."
9:32 PM EDTApprox. 29 min.Reel America Women, Law and Politics - 1971This 1971 discussion with five women is on the topic of "Women, Law and Politics." The panel ... This 1971 discussion with five women is on the topic of "Women, Law and Politics." The panel included Rep. Martha Griffiths (D-Michigan), a political science professor, a recent law school graduate, and a history professor, and is moderated by a philosophy professor. This was one in a series of ten University of Michigan Television Center programs on the topic of women's rights titled, "Girls and Women." 10:01 PM EDTApprox. 54 min.Reel America Why We Fight, Prelude to War - 1942This is the first of seven films in the "Why We Fight" series, covering the outbreak of World War ... This is the first of seven films in the "Why We Fight" series, covering the outbreak of World War II to the attack on Pearl Harbor. The documentary explores the rise of authoritarianism in Germany, Italy, and Japan, and paints the conflict between the Axis and Allies as slavery against freedom. After the December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor attack, General George C. Marshall ordered that a series of films be created to explain the causes of World War II. Under the supervision of Academy Award-winning director Frank Capra, the US Army Signal Corps produced the "Why We Fight" films between 1942 and 1945. They were shown to Army troops before deployment and eventually to the American public. "Prelude to War" won the Academy Award for best documentary in 1943. 10:55 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.World War I & the Tomb of the Unknown SoldierRetired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Gavin McIlvenna talked about the creation of the Tomb of the ... Retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Gavin McIlvenna talked about the creation of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery following World War I. A former guard at the tomb, and founder and president of the Society of the Honor Guard, he also describes the changing of the guard ceremony and reflects on the meaning of the monument. The National World War I Museum and Memorial hosted the event.
Sunday, August 12
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 32 min.1968 - America in Turmoil Women's RightsWomen protesting the 1968 Miss America pageant challenged not only the beauty contest but ... Women protesting the 1968 Miss America pageant challenged not only the beauty contest but long-held assumptions about American womanhood when they hung a bed sheet inside the Atlantic City convention hall declaring "Women's Liberation." Women's rights became part of the national conversation, transforming households and workplaces across the country and society itself. Our guests were Debora Spar, former Barnard College president and author of "Wonder Women: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection," and Mona Charen, a syndicated columnist and senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C. She is the author of the upcoming book "Sex Matters: How Modern Feminism Lost Touch with Science, Love, and Common Sense." 1:32 AM EDTApprox. 30 min.Reel America Women, Law and Politics - 1971This 1971 discussion with five women is on the topic of "Women, Law and Politics." The panel ... This 1971 discussion with five women is on the topic of "Women, Law and Politics." The panel included Rep. Martha Griffiths (D-Michigan), a political science professor, a recent law school graduate, and a history professor, and is moderated by a philosophy professor. This was one in a series of ten University of Michigan Television Center programs on the topic of women's rights titled, "Girls and Women." 2:02 AM EDTApprox. 58 min.History Bookshelf Diana Preston, Before the FalloutDiana Preston talked about her book, "Before The Fallout: From Marie Curie to Hiroshima," ... Diana Preston talked about her book, "Before The Fallout: From Marie Curie to Hiroshima," published by Walker and Company. On December 26, 1898, Marie Curie announced the discovery of radium and observed that "radioactivity seems to be an atomic property." A mere 47 years later, "Little Boy" exploded over Hiroshima. She told the story of the intervening half century, during which a quest to unravel the secrets of the material world revealed how to destroy it, and an open, international, scientific investigation changed into a secret wartime race for the bomb. After her presentation, Ms. Preston answered audience members' questions.
3:00 AM EDTApprox. 59 min.1968 Poor People's Campaign OrganizersFormer staffer to Robert F. Kennedy, Peter Edelman, and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee ... Former staffer to Robert F. Kennedy, Peter Edelman, and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee founding member, Bernard Lafayette, sat down at the National Museum of African American History & Culture to discuss the originators of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. 3:59 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 45 min.Modern U.S. Foreign RelationsA panel of historians looked at current U.S. foreign relations and compared the polices of the ... A panel of historians looked at current U.S. foreign relations and compared the polices of the Donald Trump administration to those of other modern American presidents. This discussion was part of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations annual conference in Philadelphia. 5:44 AM EDTApprox. 16 min.1830s Cholera Epidemic and Indian RemovalAmerican History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, ... American History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California, where we spoke with Sony Brook history professor Paul Kelton discussed the spread of cholera in the 1800's and how it affected Native Americans.
6:00 AM EDTApprox. 58 min.Green Berets at Vietnam's A Shau ValleyMedal of Honor recipient Bennie Adkins was interviewed by the co-author of his book "A Tiger among ... Medal of Honor recipient Bennie Adkins was interviewed by the co-author of his book "A Tiger among Us: A Story of Valor in Vietnam's A Shau Valley" Sergeant Adkins described how he and sixteen of his fellow Green Berets were attacked by a large force of North Vietnamese and Vietcong troops from March 9 to March 12, 1966, and he also told the story of a tiger that saved his life during the battle. On September 15, 2014, President Barack Obama awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor to Bennie Adkins for his actions during combat in Vietnam's A Shau Valley. 6:58 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 2 min.World War I & the Tomb of the Unknown SoldierRetired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Gavin McIlvenna talked about the creation of the Tomb of the ... Retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Gavin McIlvenna talked about the creation of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery following World War I. A former guard at the tomb, and founder and president of the Society of the Honor Guard, he also describes the changing of the guard ceremony and reflects on the meaning of the monument. The National World War I Museum and Memorial hosted the event. 8:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.History Bookshelf James David Robenalt, The Harding AffairJames David Robenalt talked about his book The Harding Affair: Love and Espionage During the Great ... James David Robenalt talked about his book The Harding Affair: Love and Espionage During the Great War (Palgrave Macmillan (September 1, 2009). In his book he recounts the political and personal life of President Warren Harding, focusing on the then U.S. senator's relationship with German sympathizer Carrie Phillips from 1905 to 1917. Mr. Robenalt provides new insight on the former president through previously unpublished love letters and journal entries. The correspondence consisted of eight hundred pages over a thirteen year period between President Harding and Carrie Phillips, a woman who would be investigated by the U.S. government for her friendship with purported German spies. At this event Mr. Rosenblat began with background information about President Harding and his excellencies as a president which he argued are unfairly disparaged. Mr. Robenalt showed photographs throughout his presentation. Afterward he responded to questions from members of the audience.
9:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.The Civil War Union Troops & PornographyVillanova University history professor Judith Giesberg talked about Union soldiers and pornography ... Villanova University history professor Judith Giesberg talked about Union soldiers and pornography during the Civil War. Professor Giesberg is author the book "Sex and the Civil War." This talk was part of the annual summer conference hosted by the Gettysburg College Civil War Institute. Note: some viewers may find images in this program offensive. 10:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 35 min.Oral Histories Women in Congress - Sue Myrick InterviewSue Myrick served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1995 to 2013. She was the first ... Sue Myrick served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1995 to 2013. She was the first Republican woman from North Carolina elected to Congress. In this interview conducted by the U.S. House of Representatives Office of the Historian, she talked about chairing the Republican Study Committee, the role of mentorship, her personal fight against breast cancer and the influence it had on her legislative career. 11:35 AM EDTApprox. 25 min.American Artifacts Life & Legacy of Billy GrahamPastor Billy Graham built a religious retreat in Asheville called The Cove. His first child ... Pastor Billy Graham built a religious retreat in Asheville called The Cove. His first child Virginia "Gigi" Graham talked about her father's tie to North Carolina and his life and legacy after his death in February 2018.
12:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Lectures in History Honor, Dueling, and Slavery in the Antebellum SouthSuffolk University professor Kenneth S. Greenberg taught a class on the role of honor and dueling ... Suffolk University professor Kenneth S. Greenberg taught a class on the role of honor and dueling in the lives of slave masters in the antebellum South. He explained what actions would have given the most offense during this period as well as the rules that governed settling a dispute. 1:10 PM EDTApprox. 49 min.The Presidency Bess & Harry TrumanHarry S. Truman Presidential Library archivist Tammy Williams talked about Harry and Bess Truman, ... Harry S. Truman Presidential Library archivist Tammy Williams talked about Harry and Bess Truman, and their life together from childhood in Independence, Missouri to the White House. She read from their love letters and discussed their 53-year marriage. The Truman library hosted this event. 1:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 47 min.Women and the Founding EraGeorge Mason University professor Rosemarie Zagarri looks at the role of women during America's ... George Mason University professor Rosemarie Zagarri looks at the role of women during America's founding era. She talks about how prior to the Revolution women had either no or very limited political and legal rights. She argues that because Patriot leaders needed a wide base of support for the Revolution, they actively recruited women to participate, giving women experience participating in politics and providing a basis for demanding more rights in the future. The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation hosted this event.
3:46 PM EDTApprox. 13 min.Chile Pepper IndustryPaul Bosland, director of the Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University, talked about ... Paul Bosland, director of the Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University, talked about this major agricultural product in New Mexico, and horticulturalist Fabian Garcia, considered the father of the U.S. Chile Pepper industry. 3:59 PM EDTApprox. 56 min.Reel America Why We Fight, Prelude to War - 1942This is the first of seven films in the "Why We Fight" series, covering the outbreak of World War ... This is the first of seven films in the "Why We Fight" series, covering the outbreak of World War II to the attack on Pearl Harbor. The documentary explores the rise of authoritarianism in Germany, Italy, and Japan, and paints the conflict between the Axis and Allies as slavery against freedom. After the December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor attack, General George C. Marshall ordered that a series of films be created to explain the causes of World War II. Under the supervision of Academy Award-winning director Frank Capra, the US Army Signal Corps produced the "Why We Fight" films between 1942 and 1945. They were shown to Army troops before deployment and eventually to the American public. "Prelude to War" won the Academy Award for best documentary in 1943. 4:55 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.World War I & the Tomb of the Unknown SoldierRetired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Gavin McIlvenna talked about the creation of the Tomb of the ... Retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Gavin McIlvenna talked about the creation of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery following World War I. A former guard at the tomb, and founder and president of the Society of the Honor Guard, he also describes the changing of the guard ceremony and reflects on the meaning of the monument. The National World War I Museum and Memorial hosted the event.
6:00 PM EDTApprox. 30 min.American Artifacts Jim Wright Special CollectionsJim Wright represented Texas' Twelfth District for thirty-four years, rising to the Speakership in ... Jim Wright represented Texas' Twelfth District for thirty-four years, rising to the Speakership in 1987 and eventually resigning because of an ethics investigation. Mary Saffell, Senior Archivist at Texas Christian University's Special Collections, shared items in his collection that provide insight into his relationship with his home district and his colleagues in the U.S. House of Representatives. 6:30 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Civil Unrest & Economic Conditions Before 1968This year is the 50th anniversary of the 1968 "Poor People's Campaign" envisioned by Martin Luther ... This year is the 50th anniversary of the 1968 "Poor People's Campaign" envisioned by Martin Luther King Jr. to shift the focus of the civil rights movement to economic issues. Reverend King was assassinated a few weeks before the campaign got underway in Washington, D.C. This program is from the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture and featured a discussion on civil unrest and economic conditions leading up to 1968, particularly in Detroit, Michigan and Newark, New Jersey. 7:40 PM EDTApprox. 20 min.Richard Nixon and the MediaPurdue University professor Kathryn Brownell explained how Richard Nixon's media strategy changed ... Purdue University professor Kathryn Brownell explained how Richard Nixon's media strategy changed from his 1960 presidential campaign loss, through his election in 1968 and during his presidency. She also described how other presidents used radio and television broadcasts during their administrations. This interview was recorded at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians.
8:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.1968 - America in Turmoil Media's RoleAmericans were eyewitnesses to war in Vietnam, astronauts orbiting the moon, chaos on their city ... Americans were eyewitnesses to war in Vietnam, astronauts orbiting the moon, chaos on their city streets, and assassinations. Television and news magazines captured America at its most volatile, vulnerable and vibrant while shaping the stories they covered. Early in 1968, CBS newsman Walter Cronkite delivered his on-air assessment that "the bloody experience of Vietnam is to end in a stalemate." To discuss the media's role in 1968, we were joined by veteran CBS journalist Marvin Kalb - who was the founding director of Harvard University's Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy - and David Hume Kennerly, who was a West Coast based UPI photographer in 1968. He covered Sen. Robert Kennedy's presidential campaign, the Vietnam War and the White House. 9:30 PM EDTApprox. 20 min.Radio & World War II-Era PoliticsWofford College history professor Mark Byrnes talked about the influence of radio on World War ... Wofford College history professor Mark Byrnes talked about the influence of radio on World War II-era politics in this interview recorded at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California. 9:50 PM EDTApprox. 10 min.History of Farming and Ranching in New MexicoCraig Massey, communications manager at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, shared the ... Craig Massey, communications manager at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, shared the state's farm and ranching history. From Native Americans, to Mexican settlers and finally American settlement, New Mexico is diverse because of the many groups who have called this place home.
10:00 PM EDTApprox. 30 min.American Artifacts Jim Wright Special CollectionsJim Wright represented Texas' Twelfth District for thirty-four years, rising to the Speakership in ... Jim Wright represented Texas' Twelfth District for thirty-four years, rising to the Speakership in 1987 and eventually resigning because of an ethics investigation. Mary Saffell, Senior Archivist at Texas Christian University's Special Collections, shared items in his collection that provide insight into his relationship with his home district and his colleagues in the U.S. House of Representatives. 10:30 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 8 min.Civil Unrest & Economic Conditions Before 1968This year is the 50th anniversary of the 1968 "Poor People's Campaign" envisioned by Martin Luther ... This year is the 50th anniversary of the 1968 "Poor People's Campaign" envisioned by Martin Luther King Jr. to shift the focus of the civil rights movement to economic issues. Reverend King was assassinated a few weeks before the campaign got underway in Washington, D.C. This program is from the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture and featured a discussion on civil unrest and economic conditions leading up to 1968, particularly in Detroit, Michigan and Newark, New Jersey. 11:38 PM EDTApprox. 22 min.Richard Nixon and the MediaPurdue University professor Kathryn Brownell explained how Richard Nixon's media strategy changed ... Purdue University professor Kathryn Brownell explained how Richard Nixon's media strategy changed from his 1960 presidential campaign loss, through his election in 1968 and during his presidency. She also described how other presidents used radio and television broadcasts during their administrations. This interview was recorded at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians.
Monday, August 13
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 30 min.1968 - America in Turmoil Media's RoleAmericans were eyewitnesses to war in Vietnam, astronauts orbiting the moon, chaos on their city ... Americans were eyewitnesses to war in Vietnam, astronauts orbiting the moon, chaos on their city streets, and assassinations. Television and news magazines captured America at its most volatile, vulnerable and vibrant while shaping the stories they covered. Early in 1968, CBS newsman Walter Cronkite delivered his on-air assessment that "the bloody experience of Vietnam is to end in a stalemate." To discuss the media's role in 1968, we were joined by veteran CBS journalist Marvin Kalb - who was the founding director of Harvard University's Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy - and David Hume Kennerly, who was a West Coast based UPI photographer in 1968. He covered Sen. Robert Kennedy's presidential campaign, the Vietnam War and the White House. 1:30 AM EDTApprox. 20 min.Radio & World War II-Era PoliticsWofford College history professor Mark Byrnes talked about the influence of radio on World War ... Wofford College history professor Mark Byrnes talked about the influence of radio on World War II-era politics in this interview recorded at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California. 1:50 AM EDTApprox. 10 min.History of Farming and Ranching in New MexicoCraig Massey, communications manager at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, shared the ... Craig Massey, communications manager at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, shared the state's farm and ranching history. From Native Americans, to Mexican settlers and finally American settlement, New Mexico is diverse because of the many groups who have called this place home.
2:00 AM EDTApprox. 54 min.Reel America Why We Fight, Prelude to War - 1942This is the first of seven films in the "Why We Fight" series, covering the outbreak of World War ... This is the first of seven films in the "Why We Fight" series, covering the outbreak of World War II to the attack on Pearl Harbor. The documentary explores the rise of authoritarianism in Germany, Italy, and Japan, and paints the conflict between the Axis and Allies as slavery against freedom. After the December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor attack, General George C. Marshall ordered that a series of films be created to explain the causes of World War II. Under the supervision of Academy Award-winning director Frank Capra, the US Army Signal Corps produced the "Why We Fight" films between 1942 and 1945. They were shown to Army troops before deployment and eventually to the American public. "Prelude to War" won the Academy Award for best documentary in 1943. 2:54 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 4 min.Black Americans, Education & PovertyThis year is the 50th anniversary of civil rights activist Stokely Carmichael's election as ... This year is the 50th anniversary of civil rights activist Stokely Carmichael's election as chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and his founding of the Black Power Movement. In this program from the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, a discussion on how education and poverty impacts black Americans in modern society. Panelists included Newark, New Jersey Mayor Ras Baraka and New York Times Magazine contributor Nikole Hannah-Jones. 3:58 AM EDTApprox. 30 min.American Artifacts Jim Wright Special CollectionsJim Wright represented Texas' Twelfth District for thirty-four years, rising to the Speakership in ... Jim Wright represented Texas' Twelfth District for thirty-four years, rising to the Speakership in 1987 and eventually resigning because of an ethics investigation. Mary Saffell, Senior Archivist at Texas Christian University's Special Collections, shared items in his collection that provide insight into his relationship with his home district and his colleagues in the U.S. House of Representatives.
4:28 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 8 min.Civil Unrest & Economic Conditions Before 1968This year is the 50th anniversary of the 1968 "Poor People's Campaign" envisioned by Martin Luther ... This year is the 50th anniversary of the 1968 "Poor People's Campaign" envisioned by Martin Luther King Jr. to shift the focus of the civil rights movement to economic issues. Reverend King was assassinated a few weeks before the campaign got underway in Washington, D.C. This program is from the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture and featured a discussion on civil unrest and economic conditions leading up to 1968, particularly in Detroit, Michigan and Newark, New Jersey. 5:36 AM EDTApprox. 48 min.The Civil War Union Gen. Winfield Hancock at Gettysburg - Day 2Author Paul Bretzger looks at Union Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock's actions on July 2, 1863, the ... Author Paul Bretzger looks at Union Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock's actions on July 2, 1863, the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, when Confederates attacked both flanks of the Union lines. Mr. Bretzger credits Hancock's leadership and timely decisions with thwarting Confederate advances and saving the Union position. The Gettysburg Heritage Center hosted this talk. 6:24 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 35 min.Oral Histories Women in Congress - Sue Myrick InterviewSue Myrick served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1995 to 2013. She was the first ... Sue Myrick served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1995 to 2013. She was the first Republican woman from North Carolina elected to Congress. In this interview conducted by the U.S. House of Representatives Office of the Historian, she talked about chairing the Republican Study Committee, the role of mentorship, her personal fight against breast cancer and the influence it had on her legislative career.