American History TV Schedule

Week of March 26 through April 2

All times and durations are subject to change

Saturday, March 28
7:35 AM EDTApprox. 25 min.American Artifacts Mayo ClinicThe Mayo Clinic is consistently ranked as one of the top hospitals in America. Brothers William ... The Mayo Clinic is consistently ranked as one of the top hospitals in America. Brothers William and Charlie Mayo founded the clinic in Rochester, Minnesota in 1889. Learn about the origins of Mayo and how it grew to become a world-renown medical facility. 8:00 AM EDTApprox. 35 min.Reel America "A Right to Health, Neighborhood Health Centers in Profile" - 1969This U.S. government documentary promotes Office of Economic Opportunity Neighborhood Health ... This U.S. government documentary promotes Office of Economic Opportunity Neighborhood Health Centers by profiling several in major cities and rural areas. The film argues that many lower income residents lack basic healthcare and instead seek help in emergency rooms when they are sick. There were 36 Neighborhood Health Centers when the film was produced. According to the National Association of Community Health Centers, 29 million people are now served in more than 12,000 communities nationwide. 8:35 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Harriet Tubman and Women's SuffrageHarriet Tubman is celebrated for her work as an abolitionist, Underground Railroad conductor and ... Harriet Tubman is celebrated for her work as an abolitionist, Underground Railroad conductor and Union Army scout during the Civil War. Karen Hill of the Harriet Tubman House talked about Tubman's lesser-known role as an activist in the women's suffrage movement. The President Woodrow Wilson House in Washington, D.C. hosted this conversation as part of a series commemorating the 100th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote.
9:50 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.American Artifacts Meadowcroft RockshelterArchaeologist James Adovasio talked about his work sifting through layers of human history dating ... Archaeologist James Adovasio talked about his work sifting through layers of human history dating back 19,000 years inside a rural Pennsylvania stream valley rock shelter. He explained why this and other locations have led to revised theories about when humans arrived in the Americas. 10:45 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton & RaceHistory professor Laura Free examined the career of suffragist and women's rights activist ... History professor Laura Free examined the career of suffragist and women's rights activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton, with a focus on her work in the 1860s. Professor Free cited numerous examples of Stanton using racist rhetoric in her newspaper writings of the period, arguing Stanton used racism in an effort to attract allies in the fight to gain voting rights for white women only. The Women's Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls, New York hosted this event. 11:45 AM EDTApprox. 49 min.The Presidency James Madison & America's Founding DocumentsEmily Voss talked about James Madison's role in shaping the Constitution and Bill of Rights, and ... Emily Voss talked about James Madison's role in shaping the Constitution and Bill of Rights, and the influence of his study of history and previous political experiences. Ms. Voss is education director at the Robert H. Smith Center for the Constitution based at James Madison's Montpelier. This talk was part of Montpelier's Presidents' Day Symposium.
12:34 PM EDTApprox. 55 min.The Presidency James and Dolley Madison's PartnershipThis was a talk about the marital and political partnership between James and Dolley Madison, ... This was a talk about the marital and political partnership between James and Dolley Madison, delivered by Elizabeth Chew, vice president for museum programs and chief curator for James Madison's Montpelier. She discussed their early lives, marriage, and how Dolley's charisma and entertaining skills bolstered the political career of the more reserved James. This was part of Montpelier's annual Presidents' Day Symposium. 1:29 PM EDTApprox. 35 min.Origins of U.S. Policies Toward Native AmericansKevin Butterfield looked at the origins of U.S. policies toward Native Americans, focusing on the ... Kevin Butterfield looked at the origins of U.S. policies toward Native Americans, focusing on the aftermath of the Revolutionary War and the initiatives of George Washington. Mr. Butterfield is the executive director of the National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. This talk took place in Richmond, Virginia as part of a day-long symposium. 2:04 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Chief Justice John Marshall & the Cherokee CasesOklahoma University law professor Lindsay Robertson examined Chief Justice John Marshall and the ... Oklahoma University law professor Lindsay Robertson examined Chief Justice John Marshall and the Supreme Court's decisions in cases involving the Cherokee Nation. In the 1830s under President Andrew Jackson the Cherokees were forcibly removed from their lands in the southeastern U.S. in what became know as the "Trail of Tears." This talk took place in Richmond, Virginia as part of a day-long symposium.
3:14 PM EDTApprox. 40 min.Trail of TearsTrail of Tears Association president Jack Baker talked about the forced relocation of Native ... Trail of Tears Association president Jack Baker talked about the forced relocation of Native Americans in the early 19th century. Mr. Baker, a member of the Cherokee Nation, also discussed his own family's involuntary move to Oklahoma. This talk was part of an all-day conference co-hosted by the Virginia Museum of History & Culture, University of Oklahoma Center for the Study of American Indian Law and Policy, and Preservation Virginia. 3:54 PM EDTApprox. 6 min.History of UNCUniversity of North Carolina Chapel Hill Archivist Nicholas Graham discussed the university's ... University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Archivist Nicholas Graham discussed the university's founding, as well as its role in the growth of the city of Chapel Hill. 4:00 PM EDTApprox. 50 min.History Bookshelf Sonia Shah, "Pandemic"Sonia Shah talked about her book, "Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and ... Sonia Shah talked about her book, "Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond," about the spread of infectious diseases around the world over the past 50 years and what might be coming next.
4:50 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.The Girl in the Picture, Remembering VietnamAuthor Mark Bowden and jazz composer Hannibal Lokumbe joined United Nations Goodwill Ambassador ... Author Mark Bowden and jazz composer Hannibal Lokumbe joined United Nations Goodwill Ambassador Kim Phuc at the National Constitution Center to discuss the legacy of the Vietnam War in an event titled, "The Girl in the Picture: Remembering Vietnam." On June 8, 1972, Associated Press photographer Nick Ut snapped a Pulitzer Prize-winning image of nine-year-old Kim Phuc, who was severely injured in a friendly fire napalm attack by South Vietnamese jets. Hannibal Lokumbe composed "Children of the Fire" when he saw the image, and performed portions of the jazz music during this program. 6:00 PM EDTApprox. 59 min.The Civil War Confederate General Hood's Texas BrigadeSusannah Ural, author of "Hood's Texas Brigade," talked about success of this Confederate unit ... Susannah Ural, author of "Hood's Texas Brigade," talked about success of this Confederate unit despite high casualties at the Battle of Antietam. She outlined the influences that shaped the brigade, including support from their families on the home front and camaraderie between the officers and soldiers. This talk was part of a symposium held at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. 6:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Smithsonian Founder James SmithsonSmithsonian Research Associate Heather Ewing talked about the life of English scientist James ... Smithsonian Research Associate Heather Ewing talked about the life of English scientist James Smithson, the founding donor of the Smithsonian Institution. She described how Smithson's enlightenment ideals and desire for public access to scientific findings led to the insitution's founding. Ms. Ewing is the author of, "The Lost World of James Smithson." This event was hosted by the Maryland Historical Society.
7:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Lectures in History 1918 Influenza Pandemic & Public InformationStony Brook University professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and ... Stony Brook University professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and public information efforts in the United States to stop the spread of the disease. She described methods such as canceling public gatherings, social distancing, and propaganda about good hygiene, which are still implemented. This class was filmed on March 10, 2020, during the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. Professor Toms compared the symptoms, economic impact, and national response between 1918 and today. 9:14 PM EDTApprox. 45 min.Slavery & Native American DisplacementUniversity of Richmond professor and president emeritus Edward Ayers discussed how the expansion ... University of Richmond professor and president emeritus Edward Ayers discussed how the expansion of slavery and westward migration displaced Native Americans throughout the antebellum period, moving them further and further from their ancestral lands. This talk is part of, "John Marshall, the Supreme Court and the Trail of Tears," an all-day conference co-hosted by the Virginia Museum of History & Culture and Preservation Virginia. 9:59 PM EDTApprox. 31 min.Reel America "The Silent Invader" - 1957The U.S. Surgeon General and several other leading health officials appeared on an educational TV ... The U.S. Surgeon General and several other leading health officials appeared on an educational TV broadcast to explain the origins, severity, symptoms, treatment, and predictions for an Asian influenza pandemic which was then in its early stages. The 1957-58 Asian H2N2 virus killed about 1 million worldwide and 116,000 in the United States. Some health officials have compared the coronavirus pandemic to the 1957-58 pandemic. This program was co-sponsored by Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, the University of Pittsburgh, the American Medical Association, and the U.S. Public Health Service.
10:30 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 12 min.Women & ComputersClaire Evans is the author of "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet." ... Claire Evans is the author of "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet." She discussed the extensive 20th century contributions of women to the development of computer technology. This event was part of the University of Mary Washington's Great Lives series. 11:42 PM EDTApprox. 13 min.Southwest Voter Registration Education ProjectFounded by Willie Velasquez in 1974, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project was ... Founded by Willie Velasquez in 1974, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project was created to increase minority participation in elections. Amy Rushing, Head of Special Collections at the University of Texas at San Antonio, showed items from the collection and explained the impact the organization had on Latinos across the Southwestern U.S. 11:55 PM EDTApprox. 5 min.Reel America March 12, 1964 Universal NewsreelThis Universal Newsreel reports on an upset in the 1964 Republican New Hampshire primary, when ... This Universal Newsreel reports on an upset in the 1964 Republican New Hampshire primary, when Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge beat Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-Arizona). A second story covers extensive flooding from Missouri to Pennsylvania.
Sunday, March 29
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Lectures in History 1918 Influenza Pandemic & Public InformationStony Brook University professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and ... Stony Brook University professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and public information efforts in the United States to stop the spread of the disease. She described methods such as canceling public gatherings, social distancing, and propaganda about good hygiene, which are still implemented. This class was filmed on March 10, 2020, during the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. Professor Toms compared the symptoms, economic impact, and national response between 1918 and today. 1:15 AM EDTApprox. 45 min.Slavery & Native American DisplacementUniversity of Richmond professor and president emeritus Edward Ayers discussed how the expansion ... University of Richmond professor and president emeritus Edward Ayers discussed how the expansion of slavery and westward migration displaced Native Americans throughout the antebellum period, moving them further and further from their ancestral lands. This talk is part of, "John Marshall, the Supreme Court and the Trail of Tears," an all-day conference co-hosted by the Virginia Museum of History & Culture and Preservation Virginia. 2:00 AM EDTApprox. 50 min.History Bookshelf Sonia Shah, "Pandemic"Sonia Shah talked about her book, "Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and ... Sonia Shah talked about her book, "Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond," about the spread of infectious diseases around the world over the past 50 years and what might be coming next.
2:50 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.The Girl in the Picture, Remembering VietnamAuthor Mark Bowden and jazz composer Hannibal Lokumbe joined United Nations Goodwill Ambassador ... Author Mark Bowden and jazz composer Hannibal Lokumbe joined United Nations Goodwill Ambassador Kim Phuc at the National Constitution Center to discuss the legacy of the Vietnam War in an event titled, "The Girl in the Picture: Remembering Vietnam." On June 8, 1972, Associated Press photographer Nick Ut snapped a Pulitzer Prize-winning image of nine-year-old Kim Phuc, who was severely injured in a friendly fire napalm attack by South Vietnamese jets. Hannibal Lokumbe composed "Children of the Fire" when he saw the image, and performed portions of the jazz music during this program. 4:00 AM EDTApprox. 56 min.The Civil War Confederate General Hood's Texas BrigadeSusannah Ural, author of "Hood's Texas Brigade," talked about success of this Confederate unit ... Susannah Ural, author of "Hood's Texas Brigade," talked about success of this Confederate unit despite high casualties at the Battle of Antietam. She outlined the influences that shaped the brigade, including support from their families on the home front and camaraderie between the officers and soldiers. This talk was part of a symposium held at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. 4:56 AM EDTApprox. 3 min.Tour of San Antonio's Pearl District
4:59 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Smithsonian Founder James SmithsonSmithsonian Research Associate Heather Ewing talked about the life of English scientist James ... Smithsonian Research Associate Heather Ewing talked about the life of English scientist James Smithson, the founding donor of the Smithsonian Institution. She described how Smithson's enlightenment ideals and desire for public access to scientific findings led to the insitution's founding. Ms. Ewing is the author of, "The Lost World of James Smithson." This event was hosted by the Maryland Historical Society. 5:59 AM EDTApprox. 36 min.Origins of U.S. Policies Toward Native AmericansKevin Butterfield looked at the origins of U.S. policies toward Native Americans, focusing on the ... Kevin Butterfield looked at the origins of U.S. policies toward Native Americans, focusing on the aftermath of the Revolutionary War and the initiatives of George Washington. Mr. Butterfield is the executive director of the National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. This talk took place in Richmond, Virginia as part of a day-long symposium. 6:35 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Chief Justice John Marshall & the Cherokee CasesOklahoma University law professor Lindsay Robertson examined Chief Justice John Marshall and the ... Oklahoma University law professor Lindsay Robertson examined Chief Justice John Marshall and the Supreme Court's decisions in cases involving the Cherokee Nation. In the 1830s under President Andrew Jackson the Cherokees were forcibly removed from their lands in the southeastern U.S. in what became know as the "Trail of Tears." This talk took place in Richmond, Virginia as part of a day-long symposium.
7:45 AM EDTApprox. 15 min.1830s Cholera Epidemic and Indian RemovalAmerican History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, ... American History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California, where we spoke with Sony Brook history professor Paul Kelton discussed the spread of cholera in the 1800's and how it affected Native Americans. 8:00 AM EDTApprox. 50 min.History Bookshelf Gary May, "The Informant"Gary May talked about his book, "The Informant: The FBI, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Murder of Viola ... Gary May talked about his book, "The Informant: The FBI, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Murder of Viola Liuzzo," published by Yale University Press. The book recounts former FBI informant Gary Thomas Rowe, Jr.'s experience as a member of the Alabama Ku Klux Klan. The author discusses the race crimes that were committed during Mr. Rowe's time as a FBI mole within the Klan, specifically the murder of civil rights activist Viola Liuzzo on March 25, 1965. Mr. May discussed the extent to which the FBI informant became involved in criminal activities and the responsibility of law enforcement agencies. He discussed the implications of using informants for gathering intelligence, including for anti-terrorist activities. Mr. May also responded to questions from members of the audience. 8:50 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.The Rise & Fall of ProhibitionThe Smithsonian Associates hosted this event in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the ... The Smithsonian Associates hosted this event in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the beginning of Prohibition enforcement in January of 1920. Historian, author, and tour guide Garrett Peck discussed the rise and fall of the 13 year experiment in America. He is the author of, "The Prohibition Hangover: Alcohol in America from Demon Rum to Cult Cabernet" and "Prohibition in Washington, D.C.: How Dry We Weren't." Prohibition was a constitutional amendment banning the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors in the United States.
10:05 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.The Civil War Insights from a Civil War HistorianWilliam "Jack" Davis offered his insights as a Civil War historian and explained how ... William "Jack" Davis offered his insights as a Civil War historian and explained how historiography has evolved from the late-20th century to the present. He talked about the lessons he has learned from past research, including the complex causes and responisbilities of the war. He is the author of "The Cause Lost: Myths and Realities of the Confederacy." This talk was part of a symposium held at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. 11:10 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.Influenza Pandemic & World War IHistorian Nancy Bristow talked about the 1918 influenza pandemic and how it devastated American ... Historian Nancy Bristow talked about the 1918 influenza pandemic and how it devastated American civilians and soldiers during the final year of World War I and beyond. She also explained why the epidemic isn't memorialized like the war itself, despite causing a higher number of deaths. Ms. Bristow is the author of "American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic." The National World War I Museum & Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri hosted this talk as part of their annual symposium. 12:05 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 41 min.Lectures in History White House MythsWhite House Historical Association historian and American University lecturer Matthew Costello ... White House Historical Association historian and American University lecturer Matthew Costello taught a class on White House myths. He talked about the realities and legends behind often repeated stories such as the tunnel system, a gift alligator, how decorating traditions began, and Dolley Madison rescuing George Washington's portrait.
1:46 PM EDTApprox. 14 min.Southwest Voter Registration Education ProjectFounded by Willie Velasquez in 1974, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project was ... Founded by Willie Velasquez in 1974, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project was created to increase minority participation in elections. Amy Rushing, Head of Special Collections at the University of Texas at San Antonio, showed items from the collection and explained the impact the organization had on Latinos across the Southwestern U.S. 2:00 PM EDTApprox. 44 min.Slavery & Native American DisplacementUniversity of Richmond professor and president emeritus Edward Ayers discussed how the expansion ... University of Richmond professor and president emeritus Edward Ayers discussed how the expansion of slavery and westward migration displaced Native Americans throughout the antebellum period, moving them further and further from their ancestral lands. This talk is part of, "John Marshall, the Supreme Court and the Trail of Tears," an all-day conference co-hosted by the Virginia Museum of History & Culture and Preservation Virginia. 2:44 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 1 min.Cherokee Nation After The Trail of TearsThe Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation talked about the tribe's history following their ... The Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation talked about the tribe's history following their removal from the Southeast to present-day Oklahoma. Chief Chuck Hoskin focused on how the Cherokee concentrated on rebuilding and strengthening their culture despite much adversity. This talk was part of an all-day conference titled, "John Marshall, the Supreme Court, and the Trail of Tears" that was co-hosted by the Virginia Museum of History & Culture and Preservation Virginia.
3:45 PM EDTApprox. 15 min.San Antonio Spanish MissionsNational Park Service Park Ranger Anna Martinez-Amos explored the San Antonio Missions National ... National Park Service Park Ranger Anna Martinez-Amos explored the San Antonio Missions National Historic Park where she shared the history of the site and the influence the Spanish Missions had on the city. 4:00 PM EDTApprox. 30 min.Reel America "The Silent Invader" - 1957The U.S. Surgeon General and several other leading health officials appeared on an educational TV ... The U.S. Surgeon General and several other leading health officials appeared on an educational TV broadcast to explain the origins, severity, symptoms, treatment, and predictions for an Asian influenza pandemic which was then in its early stages. The 1957-58 Asian H2N2 virus killed about 1 million worldwide and 116,000 in the United States. Some health officials have compared the coronavirus pandemic to the 1957-58 pandemic. This program was co-sponsored by Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, the University of Pittsburgh, the American Medical Association, and the U.S. Public Health Service. 4:30 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 12 min.Women & ComputersClaire Evans is the author of "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet." ... Claire Evans is the author of "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet." She discussed the extensive 20th century contributions of women to the development of computer technology. This event was part of the University of Mary Washington's Great Lives series.
5:42 PM EDTApprox. 18 min.Reel America "Public Health in New York State" - 1937This New York State Health Department film details its organizational structure and ... This New York State Health Department film details its organizational structure and responsibilities. The film features work in maternity care, sanitation, safe drinking water, cancer, tuberculosis control, and education. 6:00 PM EDTApprox. 35 min.Origins of U.S. Policies Toward Native AmericansKevin Butterfield looked at the origins of U.S. policies toward Native Americans, focusing on the ... Kevin Butterfield looked at the origins of U.S. policies toward Native Americans, focusing on the aftermath of the Revolutionary War and the initiatives of George Washington. Mr. Butterfield is the executive director of the National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. This talk took place in Richmond, Virginia as part of a day-long symposium. 6:35 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.Chief Justice John Marshall & the Cherokee CasesOklahoma University law professor Lindsay Robertson examined Chief Justice John Marshall and the ... Oklahoma University law professor Lindsay Robertson examined Chief Justice John Marshall and the Supreme Court's decisions in cases involving the Cherokee Nation. In the 1830s under President Andrew Jackson the Cherokees were forcibly removed from their lands in the southeastern U.S. in what became know as the "Trail of Tears." This talk took place in Richmond, Virginia as part of a day-long symposium.
7:45 PM EDTApprox. 15 min.Southwest Voter Registration Education ProjectFounded by Willie Velasquez in 1974, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project was ... Founded by Willie Velasquez in 1974, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project was created to increase minority participation in elections. Amy Rushing, Head of Special Collections at the University of Texas at San Antonio, showed items from the collection and explained the impact the organization had on Latinos across the Southwestern U.S. 8:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.The Presidency Eisenhower's Influence on Ronald ReaganRonald Reagan scholar Gene Kopelson discussed former President Dwight Eisenhower's influence on ... Ronald Reagan scholar Gene Kopelson discussed former President Dwight Eisenhower's influence on Ronald Reagan as he embarked on a political career in the 1960s. He played audio clips of Mr. Reagan talking about Mr. Eisenhower, and echoing Ike's political views. Mr. Kopelson is the author of "Reagan's 1968 Dress Rehearsal: Ike, RFK, and Reagan's Emergence as a World Statesman." The Pepperdine University School of Public Policy hosted this event. 9:05 PM EDTApprox. 55 min.The Civil War Confederate Cavalryman Thomas Wallace ColleyHistorian Michael Shaffer looked at the life of Thomas Wallace Colley, who served in the ... Historian Michael Shaffer looked at the life of Thomas Wallace Colley, who served in the Confederate 1st Virginia Cavalry during the Civil War. Using Colley's voluminous journal entries and letters, Mr. Shaffer discussed the trooper's experiences at key battles such as Bull Run and Antietam, as well as his severe wounding in 1863 and the amputation of his left foot a year later. Mr. Shaffer also examined Colley's post-war life and writings detailing his struggle with what we now call post-traumatic stress disorder. The Powhatan Civil War Roundtable hosted this event.
10:00 PM EDTApprox. 35 min.Origins of U.S. Policies Toward Native AmericansKevin Butterfield looked at the origins of U.S. policies toward Native Americans, focusing on the ... Kevin Butterfield looked at the origins of U.S. policies toward Native Americans, focusing on the aftermath of the Revolutionary War and the initiatives of George Washington. Mr. Butterfield is the executive director of the National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. This talk took place in Richmond, Virginia as part of a day-long symposium. 10:35 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 8 min.Chief Justice John Marshall & the Cherokee CasesOklahoma University law professor Lindsay Robertson examined Chief Justice John Marshall and the ... Oklahoma University law professor Lindsay Robertson examined Chief Justice John Marshall and the Supreme Court's decisions in cases involving the Cherokee Nation. In the 1830s under President Andrew Jackson the Cherokees were forcibly removed from their lands in the southeastern U.S. in what became know as the "Trail of Tears." This talk took place in Richmond, Virginia as part of a day-long symposium. 11:43 PM EDTApprox. 17 min.Reel America "Public Health in New York State" - 1937This New York State Health Department film details its organizational structure and ... This New York State Health Department film details its organizational structure and responsibilities. The film features work in maternity care, sanitation, safe drinking water, cancer, tuberculosis control, and education.
Monday, March 30
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.The Presidency Eisenhower's Influence on Ronald ReaganRonald Reagan scholar Gene Kopelson discussed former President Dwight Eisenhower's influence on ... Ronald Reagan scholar Gene Kopelson discussed former President Dwight Eisenhower's influence on Ronald Reagan as he embarked on a political career in the 1960s. He played audio clips of Mr. Reagan talking about Mr. Eisenhower, and echoing Ike's political views. Mr. Kopelson is the author of "Reagan's 1968 Dress Rehearsal: Ike, RFK, and Reagan's Emergence as a World Statesman." The Pepperdine University School of Public Policy hosted this event. 1:05 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.The Civil War Confederate Cavalryman Thomas Wallace ColleyHistorian Michael Shaffer looked at the life of Thomas Wallace Colley, who served in the ... Historian Michael Shaffer looked at the life of Thomas Wallace Colley, who served in the Confederate 1st Virginia Cavalry during the Civil War. Using Colley's voluminous journal entries and letters, Mr. Shaffer discussed the trooper's experiences at key battles such as Bull Run and Antietam, as well as his severe wounding in 1863 and the amputation of his left foot a year later. Mr. Shaffer also examined Colley's post-war life and writings detailing his struggle with what we now call post-traumatic stress disorder. The Powhatan Civil War Roundtable hosted this event. 2:00 AM EDTApprox. 30 min.Reel America "The Silent Invader" - 1957The U.S. Surgeon General and several other leading health officials appeared on an educational TV ... The U.S. Surgeon General and several other leading health officials appeared on an educational TV broadcast to explain the origins, severity, symptoms, treatment, and predictions for an Asian influenza pandemic which was then in its early stages. The 1957-58 Asian H2N2 virus killed about 1 million worldwide and 116,000 in the United States. Some health officials have compared the coronavirus pandemic to the 1957-58 pandemic. This program was co-sponsored by Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, the University of Pittsburgh, the American Medical Association, and the U.S. Public Health Service.
2:30 AM EDTApprox. 15 min.San Antonio Spanish MissionsNational Park Service Park Ranger Anna Martinez-Amos explored the San Antonio Missions National ... National Park Service Park Ranger Anna Martinez-Amos explored the San Antonio Missions National Historic Park where she shared the history of the site and the influence the Spanish Missions had on the city. 2:45 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Women & ComputersClaire Evans is the author of "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet." ... Claire Evans is the author of "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet." She discussed the extensive 20th century contributions of women to the development of computer technology. This event was part of the University of Mary Washington's Great Lives series. 4:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.The Presidency Eisenhower's Influence on Ronald ReaganRonald Reagan scholar Gene Kopelson discussed former President Dwight Eisenhower's influence on ... Ronald Reagan scholar Gene Kopelson discussed former President Dwight Eisenhower's influence on Ronald Reagan as he embarked on a political career in the 1960s. He played audio clips of Mr. Reagan talking about Mr. Eisenhower, and echoing Ike's political views. Mr. Kopelson is the author of "Reagan's 1968 Dress Rehearsal: Ike, RFK, and Reagan's Emergence as a World Statesman." The Pepperdine University School of Public Policy hosted this event.
5:05 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.The Civil War Confederate Cavalryman Thomas Wallace ColleyHistorian Michael Shaffer looked at the life of Thomas Wallace Colley, who served in the ... Historian Michael Shaffer looked at the life of Thomas Wallace Colley, who served in the Confederate 1st Virginia Cavalry during the Civil War. Using Colley's voluminous journal entries and letters, Mr. Shaffer discussed the trooper's experiences at key battles such as Bull Run and Antietam, as well as his severe wounding in 1863 and the amputation of his left foot a year later. Mr. Shaffer also examined Colley's post-war life and writings detailing his struggle with what we now call post-traumatic stress disorder. The Powhatan Civil War Roundtable hosted this event. 6:00 AM EDTApprox. 15 min.1830s Cholera Epidemic and Indian RemovalAmerican History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, ... American History TV was at the Organization of American Historians' annual meeting in Sacramento, California, where we spoke with Sony Brook history professor Paul Kelton discussed the spread of cholera in the 1800's and how it affected Native Americans. 6:15 AM EDTApprox. 45 min.Slavery & Native American DisplacementUniversity of Richmond professor and president emeritus Edward Ayers discussed how the expansion ... University of Richmond professor and president emeritus Edward Ayers discussed how the expansion of slavery and westward migration displaced Native Americans throughout the antebellum period, moving them further and further from their ancestral lands. This talk is part of, "John Marshall, the Supreme Court and the Trail of Tears," an all-day conference co-hosted by the Virginia Museum of History & Culture and Preservation Virginia.
7:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Cherokee Nation After The Trail of TearsThe Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation talked about the tribe's history following their ... The Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation talked about the tribe's history following their removal from the Southeast to present-day Oklahoma. Chief Chuck Hoskin focused on how the Cherokee concentrated on rebuilding and strengthening their culture despite much adversity. This talk was part of an all-day conference titled, "John Marshall, the Supreme Court, and the Trail of Tears" that was co-hosted by the Virginia Museum of History & Culture and Preservation Virginia.