American History TV Schedule

Week of April 1 through April 8

All times and durations are subject to change

Saturday, April 4
8:01 AM EDTApprox. 34 min.Reel America "The Silent Invader" - 1957The U.S. Surgeon General and several other leading health officials appeared on an educational TV ... The U.S. Surgeon General and several other leading health officials appeared on an educational TV broadcast to explain the origins, severity, symptoms, treatment, and predictions for an Asian influenza pandemic which was then in its early stages. The 1957-58 Asian H2N2 virus killed about 1 million worldwide and 116,000 in the United States. Some health officials have compared the coronavirus pandemic to the 1957-58 pandemic. This program was co-sponsored by Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, the University of Pittsburgh, the American Medical Association, and the U.S. Public Health Service. 8:35 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Women & ComputersClaire Evans is the author of "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet." ... Claire Evans is the author of "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet." She discussed the extensive 20th century contributions of women to the development of computer technology. This event was part of the University of Mary Washington's Great Lives series. 9:50 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 50 min.Rethinking America's Founding NarrativeConstitutional law professor Kermit Roosevelt presented a talk titled: "The Constitution and ... Constitutional law professor Kermit Roosevelt presented a talk titled: "The Constitution and Declaration of Independence: A Contrary View." Professor Roosevelt, the great-great-grandson of Theodore Roosevelt, argued that the America of today did not emerge from the Revolution and that we should not trace our values back to the Founders; instead, he argued that through failures and reinventions, we have used the Constitution as a tool to create our modern core values. Smithsonian Associates hosted the event.
11:40 AM EDTApprox. 24 min.Reel America "Firm Alliance" - 1962This U.S. Information Service film documents the April 11-13, 1962 official state visit of the ... This U.S. Information Service film documents the April 11-13, 1962 official state visit of the Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and the Empress Farah, including welcoming ceremonies at Union Station in Washington, D.C. and a state dinner hosted by President John F. Kennedy and the first lady. It also shows visits to NASA's Cape Canaveral, military sites, the United Nations, and a New York City ticker tape parade, and speeches before a joint meeting of the U.S. Congress and the National Press Club. 12:04 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 6 min.The Presidency Eisenhower's Influence on Ronald ReaganRonald Reagan scholar Gene Kopelson discussed former President Dwight Eisenhower's influence on ... Ronald Reagan scholar Gene Kopelson discussed former President Dwight Eisenhower's influence on Ronald Reagan as he embarked on a political career in the 1960s. He played audio clips of Mr. Reagan talking about Mr. Eisenhower, and echoing Ike's political views. Mr. Kopelson is the author of "Reagan's 1968 Dress Rehearsal: Ike, RFK, and Reagan's Emergence as a World Statesman." The Pepperdine University School of Public Policy hosted this event. 1:10 PM EDTApprox. 54 min.The Civil War Confederate Cavalryman Thomas Wallace ColleyHistorian Michael Shaffer looked at the life of Thomas Wallace Colley, who served in the ... Historian Michael Shaffer looked at the life of Thomas Wallace Colley, who served in the Confederate 1st Virginia Cavalry during the Civil War. Using Colley's voluminous journal entries and letters, Mr. Shaffer discussed the trooper's experiences at key battles such as Bull Run and Antietam, as well as his severe wounding in 1863 and the amputation of his left foot a year later. Mr. Shaffer also examined Colley's post-war life and writings detailing his struggle with what we now call post-traumatic stress disorder. The Powhatan Civil War Roundtable hosted this event.
2:04 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 46 min.Interpreting the American Revolution & Civil WarArt historian Judy Scott Feldman analyzed artistic portrayals of the American Revolution and Civil ... Art historian Judy Scott Feldman analyzed artistic portrayals of the American Revolution and Civil War. She talked about the influence of paintings, sculptures and memorials on how history is remembered. The Smithsonian Associates hosted this event. 3:50 PM EDTApprox. 10 min.Reel America United Newsreel on the Yalta ConferenceThis U.S. Office of War Information United Newsreel reports on the February 4-11, 1945 Yalta ... This U.S. Office of War Information United Newsreel reports on the February 4-11, 1945 Yalta Conference. The final meeting of the "Big Three" - Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and President Franklin Roosevelt took place at a Crimean resort in Ukraine. 4:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 8 min.History Bookshelf Stephen Kinzer, "The True Flag"Stephen Kinzer talked about his book "The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth ... Stephen Kinzer talked about his book "The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire," in which he recounts the public debate over American foreign policy at the turn of the 20th century. In his book, the author reports that President Theodore Roosevelt along with his supporters, such as William Randolph Hearst and Henry Cabot Lodge, proposed imperial expansion, with their sights set on the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Roosevelt's opposition, composed of public intellectuals and business leaders, such as Mark Twain, Andrew Carnegie, and Booker T. Washington, argued for restraint.
5:08 PM EDTApprox. 52 min.1944 Japanese Invasion of British IndiaWorld War II scholar Hiroyuki Shindo explored a key turning point of the war in Asia; a Japanese ... World War II scholar Hiroyuki Shindo explored a key turning point of the war in Asia; a Japanese defeat largely at the hands of British and Indian forces. The fighting took place in eastern British India, when forces under Japanese General Renya Mutaguchi launched an offensive from their stronghold in occupied Burma. This event was part of the National World War II Museum's annual conference. 6:00 PM EDTApprox. 59 min.The Civil War Abraham Lincoln and African AmericansCivil War scholar Jonathan White talked about how Abraham Lincoln interacted with African ... Civil War scholar Jonathan White talked about how Abraham Lincoln interacted with African Americans he met during his time in office. He explained how Lincoln's willingness to have African American guests at the White House and shake their hands was considered very liberal, even radical, at that time. This talk was part of a symposium held at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. 6:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 1 min.Oral Histories James Salerno Interview on Battles of Guadalcanal and Iwo JimaJames Salerno joined the Marine Corps before the attack on Pearl Harbor and served through the end ... James Salerno joined the Marine Corps before the attack on Pearl Harbor and served through the end of World War II. He discusses his time in the Pacific theater, including fighting in the battles of Guadalcanal and Iwo Jima. The National World War II Museum conducted this interview in 2007 for its oral history collection.
8:00 PM EDTApprox. 59 min.Lectures in History African Americans, Emancipation & Defining FreedomVirginia Commonwealth University professor Nicole Myers Turner taught a class on the lives of ... Virginia Commonwealth University professor Nicole Myers Turner taught a class on the lives of formerly enslaved African Americans following emancipation. She explained how they defined freedom for themselves while the federal government debated political and legal definitions. Professor Turner also discussed the important role of religious and educational institutions in newly freed African American communities. 8:59 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Prisoners of War During the American RevolutionHistory Professor T. Cole Jones talked about the culture of warfare during the 18th century in ... History Professor T. Cole Jones talked about the culture of warfare during the 18th century in Europe and North America, and explained the logistics behind capturing prisoners of war. He also illustrated the inhumane conditions inside prison camps and examined how the Continental Congress dealt with the challenges posed by thousands of prisoners. Professor Jones is the author of "Captives of Liberty: Prisoners of War and the Politics of Vengeance in the American Revolution." The American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati hosted the event. 9:59 PM EDTApprox. 56 min.Reel America "The Work of the Public Health Service" - 1936This United States Public Health Service film details a variety of methods used to combat the ... This United States Public Health Service film details a variety of methods used to combat the spread of communicable disease; from inspecting ships and immigrants at Ellis Island, to combating mosquito and rat populations, to working with state and local authorities. The United States Public Health Service originated with an Act of Congress in 1798 for the "relief of sick and disabled seamen." The role and responsibilities of what is now called the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service has changed and evolved over the years since then. This program includes graphic scenes of disease that may be disturbing to some viewers.
10:55 PM EDTApprox. 40 min.Reel America "Army Medical Laboratories" - 1947This 1947 War Department film provides an overview of the United States Army medical laboratories ... This 1947 War Department film provides an overview of the United States Army medical laboratories during World War II and their mission to both heal soldiers and prevent, detect, and control epidemics. With footage from inside working labs, it highlights training and treatment facilities across the United States and shows the capabilities of field hospitals and overseas stations. 11:35 PM EDTApprox. 14 min.Reel America "Health for All, All for Health" - 1988This World Health Organization (WHO) video documents and promotes the role of the United Nations ... This World Health Organization (WHO) video documents and promotes the role of the United Nations agency in combating disease, beginning with a brief history of how disease has afflicted humans through history, and the story of the origins of the WHO. 11:49 PM EDTApprox. 11 min.Reel America "Community Health and You" - 1954This 1950s educational film uses the experiences of two teenagers and others in the community to ... This 1950s educational film uses the experiences of two teenagers and others in the community to show how the health system works in a small town. The film covers vaccinations, protections for clean water, healthy food and detection and prevention of disease.
Sunday, April 5
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Lectures in History African Americans, Emancipation & Defining FreedomVirginia Commonwealth University professor Nicole Myers Turner taught a class on the lives of ... Virginia Commonwealth University professor Nicole Myers Turner taught a class on the lives of formerly enslaved African Americans following emancipation. She explained how they defined freedom for themselves while the federal government debated political and legal definitions. Professor Turner also discussed the important role of religious and educational institutions in newly freed African American communities. 1:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Prisoners of War During the American RevolutionHistory Professor T. Cole Jones talked about the culture of warfare during the 18th century in ... History Professor T. Cole Jones talked about the culture of warfare during the 18th century in Europe and North America, and explained the logistics behind capturing prisoners of war. He also illustrated the inhumane conditions inside prison camps and examined how the Continental Congress dealt with the challenges posed by thousands of prisoners. Professor Jones is the author of "Captives of Liberty: Prisoners of War and the Politics of Vengeance in the American Revolution." The American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati hosted the event. 2:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 10 min.History Bookshelf Stephen Kinzer, "The True Flag"Stephen Kinzer talked about his book "The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth ... Stephen Kinzer talked about his book "The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire," in which he recounts the public debate over American foreign policy at the turn of the 20th century. In his book, the author reports that President Theodore Roosevelt along with his supporters, such as William Randolph Hearst and Henry Cabot Lodge, proposed imperial expansion, with their sights set on the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Roosevelt's opposition, composed of public intellectuals and business leaders, such as Mark Twain, Andrew Carnegie, and Booker T. Washington, argued for restraint.
3:10 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.1944 Japanese Invasion of British IndiaWorld War II scholar Hiroyuki Shindo explored a key turning point of the war in Asia; a Japanese ... World War II scholar Hiroyuki Shindo explored a key turning point of the war in Asia; a Japanese defeat largely at the hands of British and Indian forces. The fighting took place in eastern British India, when forces under Japanese General Renya Mutaguchi launched an offensive from their stronghold in occupied Burma. This event was part of the National World War II Museum's annual conference. 4:05 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.The Civil War Abraham Lincoln and African AmericansCivil War scholar Jonathan White talked about how Abraham Lincoln interacted with African ... Civil War scholar Jonathan White talked about how Abraham Lincoln interacted with African Americans he met during his time in office. He explained how Lincoln's willingness to have African American guests at the White House and shake their hands was considered very liberal, even radical, at that time. This talk was part of a symposium held at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. 5:05 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.Oral Histories James Salerno Interview on Battles of Guadalcanal and Iwo JimaJames Salerno joined the Marine Corps before the attack on Pearl Harbor and served through the end ... James Salerno joined the Marine Corps before the attack on Pearl Harbor and served through the end of World War II. He discusses his time in the Pacific theater, including fighting in the battles of Guadalcanal and Iwo Jima. The National World War II Museum conducted this interview in 2007 for its oral history collection.
6:10 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.Lectures in History African Americans, Emancipation & Defining FreedomVirginia Commonwealth University professor Nicole Myers Turner taught a class on the lives of ... Virginia Commonwealth University professor Nicole Myers Turner taught a class on the lives of formerly enslaved African Americans following emancipation. She explained how they defined freedom for themselves while the federal government debated political and legal definitions. Professor Turner also discussed the important role of religious and educational institutions in newly freed African American communities. 7:05 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.American Artifacts Meadowcroft RockshelterArchaeologist James Adovasio talked about his work sifting through layers of human history dating ... Archaeologist James Adovasio talked about his work sifting through layers of human history dating back 19,000 years inside a rural Pennsylvania stream valley rock shelter. He explained why this and other locations have led to revised theories about when humans arrived in the Americas. 8:00 AM EDTApprox. 50 min.History Bookshelf Sonia Shah, "Pandemic"Sonia Shah talked about her book, "Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and ... Sonia Shah talked about her book, "Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond," about the spread of infectious diseases around the world over the past 50 years and what might be coming next.
8:50 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Smithsonian Founder James SmithsonSmithsonian Research Associate Heather Ewing talked about the life of English scientist James ... Smithsonian Research Associate Heather Ewing talked about the life of English scientist James Smithson, the founding donor of the Smithsonian Institution. She described how Smithson's enlightenment ideals and desire for public access to scientific findings led to the insitution's founding. Ms. Ewing is the author of, "The Lost World of James Smithson." This event was hosted by the Maryland Historical Society. 9:50 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.The Civil War Confederate General Hood's Texas BrigadeSusannah Ural, author of "Hood's Texas Brigade," talked about success of this Confederate unit ... Susannah Ural, author of "Hood's Texas Brigade," talked about success of this Confederate unit despite high casualties at the Battle of Antietam. She outlined the influences that shaped the brigade, including support from their families on the home front and camaraderie between the officers and soldiers. This talk was part of a symposium held at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. 10:45 AM EDTApprox. 15 min.Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum - Lincoln VaultThe Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum contains over 52,000 original items pertaining ... The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum contains over 52,000 original items pertaining to the 16th President. Archives Director Samuel Wheeler went inside the Lincoln Vault to showcase some of the museum's rarest items.
11:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 5 min.Oral Histories James Salerno Interview on Battles of Guadalcanal and Iwo JimaJames Salerno joined the Marine Corps before the attack on Pearl Harbor and served through the end ... James Salerno joined the Marine Corps before the attack on Pearl Harbor and served through the end of World War II. He discusses his time in the Pacific theater, including fighting in the battles of Guadalcanal and Iwo Jima. The National World War II Museum conducted this interview in 2007 for its oral history collection. 12:05 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 14 min.Lectures in History 1918 Influenza Pandemic & Public InformationStony Brook University professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and ... Stony Brook University professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and public information efforts in the United States to stop the spread of the disease. She described methods such as canceling public gatherings, social distancing, and propaganda about good hygiene, which are still implemented. This class was filmed on March 10, 2020, during the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. Professor Toms compared the symptoms, economic impact, and national response between 1918 and today. 1:19 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 14 min.Crispus Attucks in American MemoryHistorian and author Mitch Kachun talked about his book, "First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks ... Historian and author Mitch Kachun talked about his book, "First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks in American Memory." Professor Kachun explored how and why Attucks, a former slave who was killed at the Boston Massacre, has sometimes been celebrated and other times forgotten or vilified by Americans. The American Antiquarian Society hosted this event to mark the 250th anniversary of the March 5, 1770 Boston Massacre.
2:33 PM EDTApprox. 12 min.Reel America "Preventing the Spread of Diseases" - 1940This 1940 educational film shows how communities and individuals can prevent the spread of disease ... This 1940 educational film shows how communities and individuals can prevent the spread of disease through safe drinking water, vaccinations and practicing good hygiene. 2:45 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.U.S. & Japanese Perspectives on World War IIGrand Valley State University's Hauenstein Center hosted a discussion looking at U.S. and Japanese ... Grand Valley State University's Hauenstein Center hosted a discussion looking at U.S. and Japanese perspectives on World War II. Speakers included Pia White, whose father was a Japanese Ambassador with key roles in the 1940 alliance among Nazi Germany, Italy and Japan -- as well as negotiations in Washington, D.C. leading up to the 1941 Pearl Harbor attack. We also heard from Brian Hauenstein, grandson of Col. Ralph Hauenstein, who served as intelligence chief under Gen. Dwight Eisenhower in the war's European Theater. The Hauenstein Center is named for Ralph Hauenstein. 4:00 PM EDTApprox. 55 min.Reel America "The Work of the Public Health Service" - 1936This United States Public Health Service film details a variety of methods used to combat the ... This United States Public Health Service film details a variety of methods used to combat the spread of communicable disease; from inspecting ships and immigrants at Ellis Island, to combating mosquito and rat populations, to working with state and local authorities. The United States Public Health Service originated with an Act of Congress in 1798 for the "relief of sick and disabled seamen." The role and responsibilities of what is now called the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service has changed and evolved over the years since then. This program includes graphic scenes of disease that may be disturbing to some viewers.
4:55 PM EDTApprox. 40 min.Reel America "Army Medical Laboratories" - 1947This 1947 War Department film provides an overview of the United States Army medical laboratories ... This 1947 War Department film provides an overview of the United States Army medical laboratories during World War II and their mission to both heal soldiers and prevent, detect, and control epidemics. With footage from inside working labs, it highlights training and treatment facilities across the United States and shows the capabilities of field hospitals and overseas stations. 5:35 PM EDTApprox. 15 min.Reel America "Health for All, All for Health" - 1988This World Health Organization (WHO) video documents and promotes the role of the United Nations ... This World Health Organization (WHO) video documents and promotes the role of the United Nations agency in combating disease, beginning with a brief history of how disease has afflicted humans through history, and the story of the origins of the WHO. 5:50 PM EDTApprox. 10 min.Reel America "Community Health and You" - 1954This 1950s educational film uses the experiences of two teenagers and others in the community to ... This 1950s educational film uses the experiences of two teenagers and others in the community to show how the health system works in a small town. The film covers vaccinations, protections for clean water, healthy food and detection and prevention of disease.
6:00 PM EDTApprox. 40 min.American Artifacts 101st Airborne World War II Living History CampWe toured a reconstructed World War II U.S. Army Airborne Division barracks with living history ... We toured a reconstructed World War II U.S. Army Airborne Division barracks with living history enthusiast Greg Henesy, who showed us vehicles and detailed the 150 lbs of equipment worn by paratroopers who participated in the Normandy invasion on D-Day and other battles. 6:40 PM EDTApprox. 5 min.Tour of San Antonio's Pearl DistrictRichard Oliver of Visit San Antonio explained the history of the city's Pearl District and the ... Richard Oliver of Visit San Antonio explained the history of the city's Pearl District and the influence of German immigrants 6:45 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Crispus Attucks in American MemoryHistorian and author Mitch Kachun talked about his book, "First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks ... Historian and author Mitch Kachun talked about his book, "First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks in American Memory." Professor Kachun explored how and why Attucks, a former slave who was killed at the Boston Massacre, has sometimes been celebrated and other times forgotten or vilified by Americans. The American Antiquarian Society hosted this event to mark the 250th anniversary of the March 5, 1770 Boston Massacre.
8:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Booknotes Doris Kearns Goodwin, "No Ordinary Time"Doris Kearns Goodwin talked about her recently published book, "No Ordinary Time: Franklin and ... Doris Kearns Goodwin talked about her recently published book, "No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, the Home Front in World War II," published by Simon and Schuster, which focused on the White House scene during Franklin Roosevelt's term, including the intimate circle of friends surrounding President and Mrs. Roosevelt. 9:00 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Q&A Richard Norton SmithPresidential historian Richard Norton Smith talked about "An Uncommon Man," his biography of ... Presidential historian Richard Norton Smith talked about "An Uncommon Man," his biography of President Herbert Hoover. 10:00 PM EDTApprox. 40 min.American Artifacts 101st Airborne World War II Living History CampWe toured a reconstructed World War II U.S. Army Airborne Division barracks with living history ... We toured a reconstructed World War II U.S. Army Airborne Division barracks with living history enthusiast Greg Henesy, who showed us vehicles and detailed the 150 lbs of equipment worn by paratroopers who participated in the Normandy invasion on D-Day and other battles.
10:40 PM EDTApprox. 5 min.West Virginia FolkloreThe West Virginia Humanities Council's state folklorist Emily Hilliard discussed the ways the West ... The West Virginia Humanities Council's state folklorist Emily Hilliard discussed the ways the West Virginia Folklife program is documenting traditional Appalachian culture in the Mountain State, and who gets included in the Appalachian identity. 10:45 PM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Crispus Attucks in American MemoryHistorian and author Mitch Kachun talked about his book, "First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks ... Historian and author Mitch Kachun talked about his book, "First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks in American Memory." Professor Kachun explored how and why Attucks, a former slave who was killed at the Boston Massacre, has sometimes been celebrated and other times forgotten or vilified by Americans. The American Antiquarian Society hosted this event to mark the 250th anniversary of the March 5, 1770 Boston Massacre.
Monday, April 6
12:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Booknotes Doris Kearns Goodwin, "No Ordinary Time"Doris Kearns Goodwin talked about her recently published book, "No Ordinary Time: Franklin and ... Doris Kearns Goodwin talked about her recently published book, "No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, the Home Front in World War II," published by Simon and Schuster, which focused on the White House scene during Franklin Roosevelt's term, including the intimate circle of friends surrounding President and Mrs. Roosevelt. 1:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Q&A Richard Norton SmithPresidential historian Richard Norton Smith talked about "An Uncommon Man," his biography of ... Presidential historian Richard Norton Smith talked about "An Uncommon Man," his biography of President Herbert Hoover. 2:00 AM EDTApprox. 55 min.Reel America "The Work of the Public Health Service" - 1936This United States Public Health Service film details a variety of methods used to combat the ... This United States Public Health Service film details a variety of methods used to combat the spread of communicable disease; from inspecting ships and immigrants at Ellis Island, to combating mosquito and rat populations, to working with state and local authorities. The United States Public Health Service originated with an Act of Congress in 1798 for the "relief of sick and disabled seamen." The role and responsibilities of what is now called the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service has changed and evolved over the years since then. This program includes graphic scenes of disease that may be disturbing to some viewers.
2:55 AM EDTApprox. 40 min.Reel America "Army Medical Laboratories" - 1947This 1947 War Department film provides an overview of the United States Army medical laboratories ... This 1947 War Department film provides an overview of the United States Army medical laboratories during World War II and their mission to both heal soldiers and prevent, detect, and control epidemics. With footage from inside working labs, it highlights training and treatment facilities across the United States and shows the capabilities of field hospitals and overseas stations. 3:35 AM EDTApprox. 14 min.Reel America "Health for All, All for Health" - 1988This World Health Organization (WHO) video documents and promotes the role of the United Nations ... This World Health Organization (WHO) video documents and promotes the role of the United Nations agency in combating disease, beginning with a brief history of how disease has afflicted humans through history, and the story of the origins of the WHO. 3:49 AM EDTApprox. 11 min.Reel America "Community Health and You" - 1954This 1950s educational film uses the experiences of two teenagers and others in the community to ... This 1950s educational film uses the experiences of two teenagers and others in the community to show how the health system works in a small town. The film covers vaccinations, protections for clean water, healthy food and detection and prevention of disease.
4:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr.Booknotes Doris Kearns Goodwin, "No Ordinary Time"Doris Kearns Goodwin talked about her recently published book, "No Ordinary Time: Franklin and ... Doris Kearns Goodwin talked about her recently published book, "No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, the Home Front in World War II," published by Simon and Schuster, which focused on the White House scene during Franklin Roosevelt's term, including the intimate circle of friends surrounding President and Mrs. Roosevelt. 5:00 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 15 min.Crispus Attucks in American MemoryHistorian and author Mitch Kachun talked about his book, "First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks ... Historian and author Mitch Kachun talked about his book, "First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks in American Memory." Professor Kachun explored how and why Attucks, a former slave who was killed at the Boston Massacre, has sometimes been celebrated and other times forgotten or vilified by Americans. The American Antiquarian Society hosted this event to mark the 250th anniversary of the March 5, 1770 Boston Massacre. 6:15 AM EDTApprox. 1 hr. 46 min.Interpreting the American Revolution & Civil WarArt historian Judy Scott Feldman analyzed artistic portrayals of the American Revolution and Civil ... Art historian Judy Scott Feldman analyzed artistic portrayals of the American Revolution and Civil War. She talked about the influence of paintings, sculptures and memorials on how history is remembered. The Smithsonian Associates hosted this event.