BOOKNOTES+
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Taking the concept from Brian Lamb's long running Booknotes TV program, the podcast offers listeners more books and authors. Booknotes+ features a mix of new interviews with authors and historians, along with some old favorites from the archives. The platform may be different, but the goal is the same – give listeners the opportunity to learn something new.
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Monday
Ep. 98 Dorian Lynskey, "The Ministry of Truth"
The language of 2023: "threat to democracy," "Antifa," "Stop the Steal," "fascism," "Proud Boys," "Brexit," "artificial intelligence," "BleachBit." Who understands all this? Where does the language come from? We asked British author Dorian Lynskey, our guest this week, to help us. His latest book is titled "The Ministry of Truth: The Biography of George Orwell's 1984." In the introduction, Lynskey writes that "The phrases and concepts that Orwell minted have become essential fixtures of political language, still potent after decades of use and misuse: newspeak, Big Brother, the thought police, Room 101,…doublethink, unperson, memory hole" and much more.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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January 17, 2023
Ep. 97 Beverly Gage, "G-Man"
In Yale history professor Beverly Gage's 837-page cradle-to-grave biography of J. Edgar Hoover, she writes, "I do not count myself among Hoover's admirers." However, in the introduction, she says her book "G-Man" is less about judging him than about understanding him. Hoover ran the FBI for 48 years until he died at age 77 in 1972. Prof. Gage, who did her undergraduate work at Yale and received her Ph.D. from Columbia, writes that "Hoover emerged as one of history's great villains. Perhaps the most universally reviled American political figure of the 20th century." She joins us to talk about her new book and the complicated life and career of J. Edgar Hoover.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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January 10, 2023
Ep. 96 Paul Gregory, "The Oswalds"
Back in the period between June to November of 1962, Paul Gregory reportedly knew Lee and Marina Oswald better than anyone else. Two hours after President Kennedy's assassination, Mr. Gregory, then a student at the University of Oklahoma, was watching television and saw members of the Dallas police escorting a suspect into police headquarters. Paul Gregory said out loud, "I know that man," meaning Lee Harvey Oswald. Sixty years later he has written a book about his friendship with the Oswalds and the conspiracy theories surrounding Kennedy's assassination. He joined us to about it.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Download (Duration: 1h 7m) | Share This Episode
January 3, 2023
Ep. 95 Steve Kornacki, Host of "The Revolution" Podcast
Steve Kornacki, our guest this week, is the national political correspondent for NBC News. You see him often around campaigns and election nights in front of what the network calls the "Big Board." He recently finished a 7-part podcast series called "The Revolution with Steve Kornacki." It's the story of how the Republicans took over the U.S. House of Representatives for the first time in 40 years. That happened in 1994 and was organized and led by former Georgia congressman and Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Download (Duration: 1h 10m) | Share This Episode
December 27, 2022
Ep. 94 Author and Opinion Writer Gordon Chang on China and Its Future
Gordon Chang, our guest this week, is a well-known opinion writer, book author, and graduate of Cornell Law School. His father was born in China. His mother is of Scottish ancestry. Gordon Chang was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up 25 miles outside of New York City. At Columbia High School in Maplewood, New Jersey, he was president of his class. Mr. Chang spent almost two decades in China, where he practiced international law. In the past 20 years, he has appeared regularly in the American media. Gordon Chang was the author of "The Coming Collapse of China" in 2001. We asked him if he's still sticking by that prediction.        Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Download (Duration: 1h 9m) | Share This Episode
Past Programs
    December 20, 2022
    Ep. 93 Mark Bergen, "Like, Comment, Subscribe"
    On the cover of Bloomberg reporter Mark Bergen's most recent book, "Like, Comment, Subscribe," it says it will take the reader "Inside YouTube's Chaotic Rise to World Domination." Mr. Bergen, our guest this week, has reported on Google for the past seven years. YouTube was bought by Google in 2014 for $1.6 billion. In the prologue to the book, Bergen reports that more than 2 billion people visit YouTube every month, making it the second most visited search engine on Earth, second only to Google. He adds that YouTube is still dominated by music, gaming, and videos for children.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 8m) | Share This Episode
    December 13, 2022
    Ep. 92 Matthew Delmont, "Half American"
    The title of Dartmouth history professor Matthew Delmont's latest book is "Half American: The Epic Story of African Americans Fighting World War II at Home and Abroad." Prof. Delmont, our guest this week, writes in his introduction that: "Nearly everything about the war – the start and end dates, geography, vital military roles, home front, and international implications – looks different form the African American perspective." He points out that ultimately, over one million Black men and women served in World War II.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 4m) | Share This Episode
    December 6, 2022
    Ep. 91 Winslow Wheeler on the United States' Military Posture
    A couple of weeks ago, the conservative Heritage Foundation published its 2023 Index of U.S. Military Strength. At that time, we discussed the Index's findings with the editor, Dakota Wood. The Heritage study concluded that the current U.S. military is at significant risk of not being able to meet the demands of a single major regional conflict.  We wanted another point of view on the current U.S. military posture. So this week, we asked longtime observer and critic of the U.S. military procurement process, Winslow Wheeler, to talk with us. He has spent over 40 years working on national security defense budgets and military reform for both political parties, the Government Accountability Office and the Center for Defense Information.        Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 8m) | Share This Episode
    November 29, 2022
    Ep. 90 Adam Hochschild, "American Midnight"
    Adam Hochschild, in his new book "American Midnight," writes about what he says is left out of the typical high school American history book, especially when the subject is the United States during and immediately after World War One. "This book is about what's missing," writes Hochschild, "It's a story of mass imprisonments, torture, vigilante violence, censorship, killings of Black Americans, and far more that is not marked by commemorative plaques, museum exhibits, or Ken Burns documentaries." Adam Hochschild joins us to discuss it all.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 7m) | Share This Episode
    November 22, 2022
    Ep. 89 Mark Dimunation, Library of Congress Rare Book & Special Collections Division Chief
    To people who know him well, Mark Dimunation is, first and foremost, an accomplished storyteller. Second and not least, he has been for twenty-five years the chief of the Library of Congress' Rare Book and Special Collections Division. The library has over 850,000 items in the collection, including Charles Dickens' walking stick, the Bay Psalm Book, published in 1640, and the contents in Abraham Lincoln's pockets on the night he was assassinated. Mark Dimunation, our guest this week, has a lot more to add to a conversation about his work.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 7m) | Share This Episode
    November 15, 2022
    Ep. 88 Stacy Schiff, "The Revolutionary: Samuel Adams"
    Stacy Schiff has written books about Benjamin Franklin, Cleopatra, and the Witches of Salem. And now it's Samuel Adams, a Massachusetts man Thomas Jefferson called the Father of the American Revolution. Stacy Schiff, appropriately born in Adams, Massachusetts, is our guest this week. Her book is titled "The Revolutionary: Samuel Adams." Mr. Adams was born in Boston and lived for 81 years from 1722 to 1803. He's also been called the most Puritan and the most populist of the American Founders. If you met him before his forty-first birthday, according to author Schiff, you probably wouldn't consider him much of a success. Includes bonus interview material. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 2h 7m) | Share This Episode
    November 8, 2022
    Ep. 87 Dakota Wood, Editor, "2023 Index of U.S. Military Strength"
    In October, the Heritage Foundation in Washington, DC, released its 578-page 2023 Index of U.S. Military Strength. Retired Marine Lt. Col. Dakota Wood edited the Index, which includes essays and analysis from over 16 experts chosen by the Heritage Foundation. The introduction to the Index concludes: "America’s leadership role remains in question, and its security interests are under substantial pressure. Challenges continue to grow, long-standing allies are not what they once were, and the U.S. is increasingly bedeviled by debt and domestic discord that constrain its ability to sustain its forces at a level that is commensurate with its interests." Lt. Col. Wood joins us to talk about the findings.      Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 18m) | Share This Episode
    November 1, 2022
    Ep. 86 Vivek Ramaswamy, "Nation of Victims"
    At age 37, Vivek Ramaswamy has already built and sold several companies. Before he began his career as an entrepreneur, he managed to serve as the valedictorian of his 2003 senior class at St. Xavier High School in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was a nationally ranked junior tennis player. Then there was a Harvard biology degree and graduation from Yale Law School. Ramaswamy has written two books. His latest is "Nation of Victims: Identity Politics, the Death of Merit, and the Path Back to Excellence."     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 7m) | Share This Episode
    October 25, 2022
    Ep. 85 Nell Wulfhart, "The Great Stewardess Rebellion"
    "The Great Stewardess Rebellion" is about the women who changed the working conditions for stewardesses in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The author, Nell Wulfhart wrote the New York Times "Carry-On" column from 2016 to 2019. In the introduction to her book, Ms. Wulfhart writes that: "It wouldn't be much of an exaggeration to say that in the 1960s the airplane cabin was the most sexist workplace in America." Since then, she adds, the "flight attendants' achievements are, even from today's perspective, remarkable: they forced the airlines to promote them alongside men, to pay them fairly, to treat them as legitimate workers."   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    October 18, 2022
    Ep. 84 Brad Snyder, "Democratic Justice"
    Brad Snyder offers a full and fascinating portrait of the life and legacy of Felix Frankfurter. This is the biography of an Austrian Jewish immigrant who arrived in the United States at age eleven speaking, not a word of English, who by age twenty-six befriended former president Theodore Roosevelt, and who by age fifty was one of Franklin Roosevelt’s most trusted advisers. It is the story of a man devoted to democratic ideals, a natural orator and often overbearing justice, whose passion allowed him to amass highly influential friends and helped create the liberal establishment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    October 11, 2022
    Ep. 83 Charles Kupchan on Russian Propaganda and the War in Ukraine
    Charles Kupchan is a professor of international affairs at Georgetown University. He has served on the National Security Council for both the Clinton and Obama White Houses. Prof. Kupchan has a doctorate and a master's degree from Oxford and an undergraduate degree from Harvard. He is the author of 10 books. His latest is titled "Isolationism: A History of America's Efforts to Shield Itself from the World." We asked Prof. Kupchan to appear on the podcast to give his perspective on Vladimir Putin and his use of propaganda during the current war in Ukraine.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    October 4, 2022
    Ep. 82 Greg Steinmetz, "American Rascal"
    Jay Gould revolutionized the world of finance in the 19th century. In “American Rascal,” Greg Steinmetz tells his story. Jay Gould was a brilliant strategist in any scrap over money. For a good example of Mr. Gould’s cunning, consider how he outgeneraled his fellow robber baron Cornelius Vanderbilt in what might be called the Bovine War. The former reporter for the Wall Street Journal and current partner at a money management firm in New York City sheds light on the life of Gould and his abilities with finances. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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    September 27, 2022
    Ep. 81 Troy Senik, "A Man of Iron"
    Author Troy Senik says in his new book, "A Man of Iron," that Grover Cleveland was the self-made, scrupulously honest man Americans often say they want as their president. President Cleveland served two nonconsecutive terms as commander and chief, a term as Governor of New York, and even as sheriff in western New York's Erie County.  In this episode, Mr. Senik, a former speechwriter for George W. Bush, discusses Cleveland's political career. According to Mr. Senik President Cleveland became the most successful Democratic politician of his era, though he has become a minor icon for modern-day libertarians.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 4m) | Share This Episode
    September 20, 2022
    Ep. 80 Judy Shelton on the Federal Reserve
    Judy Shelton has been appearing on C-SPAN since 1989 and in this edition of the Booknotes+ podcast, she talks about the role of the Federal Reserve in our economy. . Her first visit was on Booknotes to discuss her book titled "The Coming Soviet Crash." During the past 33 years since her first appearance on C-SPAN, Judy Shelton has been in and out of politics. She worked for a time with three presidential candidates, including Bob Dole, Ben Carson, and Donald Trump. It was President Trump who nominated her to serve on the board of the Federal Reserve. Her selection to the Fed was controversial, and eventually, President Joe Biden's administration withdrew her nomination in February of 2021.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    September 13, 2022
    Ep. 79 Claire Arcenas, "America's Philosopher"
    John Locke was born on August 29, 1632, in Sommerset, England. He lived for 72 years. University of Montana professor Claire Arcenas, in her new book, calls him "America's Philosopher." She writes in the preface: "Though he never set foot on America soil and died long before the creation of the United States, John Locke stands and has always stood at the center of American intellectual life." Prof. Arcenas focuses on how Locke has captivated our attention for three centuries and has had an unparalleled influence on the development of American thought and culture.      Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 7m) | Share This Episode
    September 6, 2022
    Ep. 78 Alanna Nash, "The Colonel"
    On August 16, 1977, 45 years ago, Elvis Presley died at age 42. The autopsy found eight different drugs in his body. Just seven years earlier, Presley was with Richard Nixon in the Oval Office to offer his assistance in fighting the war on drugs. He asked for a special agent badge from the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. A copy of the photo of President Nixon and Elvis on that occasion is the most requested from the National Archives. Our guest, cultural journalist Alanna Nash, has spent a lot of her professional life telling the story of Elvis and his well-known manager, Colonel Tom Parker. She reveals in her book "The Colonel" that Parker was not an American and wasn’t originally named Tom Parker.         Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 8m) | Share This Episode
    September 5, 2022
    C-SPAN in the Classroom Trailer: Season 2
    Hey all you teachers and all you parents, and all you professors and all you students: Season #2 of the C-SPAN in the Classroom podcast drops this fall! Whether you're mowing the yard, on a peaceful weekend drive, or just relaxing on the couch with your favorite blanket, make sure to tune in to the first episode of Season #2 of C-SPAN in the Classroom on September 10th, available at c-span.org, on the free C-SPAN Now app, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Make sure to like, subscribe, and share, and visit us at www.c-span.org/classroom. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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    August 30, 2022
    Ep. 77 Ron Liebman & Tim Baker on the Prosecution of Vice President Spiro Agnew
    Ron Liebman and Tim Baker are former assistant U.S. attorneys who were part of the prosecution team that brought down Vice President Spiro Agnew on October 10, 1973. On that day, Mr. Agnew appeared before the federal court in Baltimore and pleaded "no contest" to one felony charge for tax evasion in 1967. Messrs. Liebman and Baker talked about their role as the case unfolded. Agnew was fined $10,000 and placed on three years of unsupervised probation. This conversation was originally recorded in 2019.     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 3m) | Share This Episode
    August 23, 2022
    Ep. 76 Terrence Smith, "Four Wars, Five Presidents"
    Terence Smith's media career went from the Stamford Advocate the New York Times, then to CBS News, and finally the PBS Newshour. In his short memoir of his working life, titled "Four Wars, Five Presidents," Terrence Smith writes: "There is a great deal of hand-wringing these days about the news business. Young people don’t read, don’t know anything beyond what they see on their screen, and don’t see the value of independent knowledge as long as they have Google and can look it up. The sky, we are told, is falling."   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 2m) | Share This Episode
    August 16, 2022
    Ep. 75 David Kertzer, "The Pope at War"
    David Kertzer has studied and written about Italy, the Catholic Church, Nazism, communism, and fascism for over 40 years. His latest of 13 books is about the secret history of Pope Pius XII, Mussolini, and Hitler. It's titled "The Pope at War." In 2020, Pius XII's archives were finally open in the Vatican. Brown University professor Kertzer, according to Random House, his publisher, "paints a new, dramatic portrait of what the pope did and did not do as war enveloped the continent and as the Nazis began their systematic mass murder of Europe’s Jews."  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 10m) | Share This Episode
    August 9, 2022
    Ep. 74 Aram Saroyan, author of "Last Rites," on His Father William Saroyan
    In the history of Pulitzer Prizes and the Oscars, very few winners have turned down these awards. One of those who did was a famous Armenian-American, a writer from the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. His name was William Saroyan. He turned down the Pulitzer for the drama called "The Time of Your Life" in 1940. Saroyan said he was opposed in principle to awards in the arts and was quoted as saying "such arts awards vitiate and embarrass art at its very source." His son Aram, a well-known poet in his own right, has written a lot about his father and his relationship with him. We asked him to talk about his book "Last Rites: The Death of William Saroyan."   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 13m) | Share This Episode
    August 2, 2022
    Ep. 73 Carl Foster, Director of the Little Blue House
    In the heart of Washington, DC, is a unique place for kids. It's called the Little Blue House. For 31 years, it's been the first love of its director, a man named Carl Foster. On the website of the Little Blue House, it says that there is a single core mission: "to foster the development of vulnerable and at-risk children and youth in the District in a safe, stable, and healthy environment." Carl Foster, a Vietnam War veteran, says that for over 30 years, the Little Blue House "has provided whatever service was needed by our kids to give them a chance to become self-sufficient adults."  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    July 26, 2022
    Ep. 72 Stephen Eide, "Homelessness in America"
    "Americans react to homeless with a mix of anger, compassion, perplexity, and frustration. Little progress ever seems to be made." Those are the thoughts of Stephen Eide, from his book "Homelessness in America." Mr. Eide is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute with a PhD in political philosophy from Boston College. He focuses a good deal of the 151-page book on the housing issue. In Chapter 11 he suggests: "When housing is all that anyone debates, nothing winds up getting done about public disorder, drug addiction, and untreated mental illness."   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 4m) | Share This Episode
    July 19, 2022
    Ep. 71 David Gelles, "The Man Who Broke Capitalism"
    New York Times reporter David Gelles claims in his latest book that legendary General Electric CEO Jack Welch is the root of all that's wrong with capitalism today. The title of his book is "The Man Who Broke Capitalism: How Jack Welch Gutted the Heartland and Crushed the Soul of Corporate America – And How to Undo His Legacy." Mr. Gelles says while Welch made G.E. the most valuable company on Earth, his strategies ultimately destroyed what he loved so dearly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 59m) | Share This Episode
    July 12, 2022
    Ep. 70 Author & Essayist Lance Morrow
    Lance Morrow is an author, writer, and essayist. He joined Time magazine in 1965. During his time there, Morrow covered the Detroit riots, the Vietnam War, the Nixon administration, and the Watergate scandal. In 1976 he became a regular writer of essays for Time magazine and wrote more "Man of the Year" cover articles than any other reporter. From 1996 to 2006, he was a professor at Boston University. His several books include "Evil: An Investigation," "God and Mammon," and his latest, "The Noise of Typewriters," to be issued in January of 2023.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 58m) | Share This Episode
    July 5, 2022
    Ep. 69 Beverley Eddy, "Ritchie Boy Secrets"
    According to Beverley Driver Eddy, little has been written about Camp Ritchie, Maryland. Dickinson College retired professor Eddy says in her book "Ritchie Boy Secrets" that on June 19, 1942, the U.S. Army opened a secret military intelligence training center. Over the next four years, it produced some 20,000 graduates, intelligence and language specialists, for service in World War Two. Some of the famous names of men who were Ritchie Boys include J.D. Salinger, former senators John Chafee and Frank Church, David Rockefeller, and Reverend William Sloan Coffin.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 3m) | Share This Episode
    July 1, 2022
    Presidential Recordings Trailer: Season 2 President Richard Nixon
    At least 6 U.S. Presidents recorded conversations while in office. Hear those conversations on this C-SPAN podcast. Season 2 focuses on President Richard Nixon's secretly-recorded private telephone conversations. Through eight episodes, hear Richard Nixon talk with key aides about Watergate strategy, potential Supreme Court Nominees, and hear his reaction to the leaked publication of the Pentagon Papers.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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    June 28, 2022
    Ep. 68 Thomas Kidd, "Thomas Jefferson"
    Historian Thomas Kidd, a professor at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in St. Louis, opens his newest book, "Thomas Jefferson: A Biography of Spirit and Flesh," this way: "This is a biography of a brilliant but troubled person. Thomas Jefferson would seem to need no introduction, yet among the Founding Fathers he is the greatest enigma – and the greatest source of controversy." Professor Kidd also writes that "Jefferson left a massive collection of carefully curated papers, but he seems virtually unknowable as a man." Mr. Jefferson was our third president and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence.      Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    June 21, 2022
    Ep. 67 David S. Brown, "The First Populist"
    Elizabethtown College professor David S. Brown is the author of a new book on former president Andrew Jackson. Professor Brown writes that Jackson was the first president to be born in a log cabin, to live beyond the Appalachians, and to rule, so he swore, in the name of the people. The title of the book is "The First Populist: The Defiant Life of Andrew Jackson." He was president for two terms, eight years, from 1829-1837. Jackson, in his lifetime, was a jurist, a general, a congressman, a senator, and America's seventh president.      Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    June 14, 2022
    Ep. 66 Bruce Oudes, "From: The President-Richard Nixon's Secret Files"
    Booknotes the television program started in April of 1989. Our third guest was journalist Bruce Oudes. His book was titled "From: The President-Richard Nixon's Secret Files." Because the 50th anniversary of the Watergate break-in is on June 17th, Booknotes+ is revisiting Mr. Oudes' book, which contains over 600 pages of previously unreleased memoranda from Richard Nixon and aides during the six years of his presidency. Bruce Oudes took a deep dive into over 3.5 million pages of material that were housed at a government warehouse in Alexandria, Virginia.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 55m) | Share This Episode
    June 7, 2022
    Ep. 65 Author and Historian Harold Holzer on Abraham Lincoln
    Any follower of C-SPAN knows the name Harold Holzer, a lifelong aficionado and chronicler of Abraham Lincoln. He has either written or edited fifty-four books on America's 16th president. President Lincoln has been Mr. Holzer's avocation over these many years while he maintained full-time work and responsibilities for twenty-three of those years as senior vice president for public affairs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. He currently serves as director of Hunter College's Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute. Recently, he talked about his favorite pastime, Mr. Lincoln, before an audience at Purdue University. Students were able to ask many questions about Abraham Lincoln and how the media has treated some of the other forty-five presidents in our country's history.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 25m) | Share This Episode
    May 31, 2022
    Ep. 64 Andrew Kaufman on Russian Writer Leo Tolstoy
    Not a day goes by that Russia is not in the news, especially since the February 24th invasion of Ukraine. In the history of Russia, one of the most familiar figures, especially in the world of writing and writers, is Leo Tolstoy. He's best known for two novels, "War & Peace" (1869) and "Anna Karenina" (1878). He lived for 82 years, had 13 children, was married for 48 years, and left his wife just before he died in 1910. We asked University of Virginia professor Andrew Kaufman, author of two books on Tolstoy, to give us his take on Russia and Tolstoy's attitude toward war.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 58m) | Share This Episode
    May 24, 2022
    Ep. 63 Olivier Zunz, "The Man Who Understood Democracy"
    Professor Olivier Zunz has been a professor of history at the University of Virginia since 1979. He was born and raised in France and received his Ph.D. from Pantheon Sorbonne University in Paris in 1977. Alexis de Tocqueville (TOKE-vihl) was also a Frenchman. At 25, Tocqueville traveled throughout the United States for nine months and recorded his experiences in the well-known 1835 book "Democracy in America." Professor Zunz has just published the newest book on Tocqueville titled "The Man Who Understood Democracy."  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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    May 17, 2022
    Ep. 62 Joe Madison, "Radio Active"
    Joe Madison has hosted a radio talk show for over 40 years. He's known to his audience as the "Black Eagle" and can be heard daily on SiriusXM radio. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a graduate of Washington University in St. Louis, Mr. Madison started his professional life as an activist. One of his first jobs was working for the NAACP as political director under the leadership of Ben Hooks. Joe Madison angered both his allies and adversaries when he organized a boycott against Dearborn, Michigan, when that city prohibited nonresidents, including African-Americans in Detroit, from visiting its public parks. This story and many other are included in his memoir titled, "Radio Active."     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 21m) | Share This Episode
    May 10, 2022
    Ep. 61 Megan McArdle, Washington Post Columnist
    Megan McArdle has been a columnist for the Washington Post since 2018. She has described herself as a right-leaning libertarian. At the same time, she says she's actually a social liberal. Megan McArdle graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in English literature in 1994 and worked for several start-ups before getting an MBA from the University of Chicago. She started her professional writing career as a blogger in November 2001. Since then, Ms. McArdle has written for the Economist, the Atlantic, Newsweek, and Bloomberg View. In a recent column in the Washington Post, writing about today's journalism, she said: "We are not trusted because we are not entirely trustworthy."     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    May 3, 2022
    Ep. 60 Deborah Cohen, "Last Call at the Hotel Imperial"
    The book is called "Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War." The author is Deborah Cohen, a professor at Northwestern University. Prof. Cohen primarily focuses on four American journalists who traveled the world in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s: H.R. Knickerbocker, Vincent "Jimmy" Sheean, Dorothy Thompson, and John Gunther. These reporters landed exclusive interviews with Hitler, Mussolini, Nehru and Gandhi and helped shape what Americans at the time knew about the world.       Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    April 26, 2022
    Ep. 59 Dr. Thomas Fisher, "The Emergency"
    For the past twenty years, Dr. Thomas Fisher has worked in the emergency department at the University of Chicago Medical Center, serving the same South Side community in which he was raised. During the past two years of COVID-19, he decided to write about his experience in a large urban hospital emergency room. He says that at the end of a shift he was haunted by the confusion in the eyes of his patients. He asks a couple of questions that they probably are thinking: Who is this man treating them from behind a mask? Why do they have to wait so many hours to be treated? Dr. Fisher attempts to answer these and many other questions in his book "The Emergency: A Year of Healing and Heartbreak in a Chicago ER."       Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 7m) | Share This Episode
    April 19, 2022
    Ep. 58 Jeffrey Frank, "The Trials of Harry S. Truman"
    In Jeffrey Frank's recent book titled "The Trials of Harry S. Truman," he reports that at his low point in his time as president, Truman's popularity rating was at 16 percent. However, seventy years later, according to the latest C-SPAN survey, he was ranked sixth most effective of 44 U.S. presidents. Jeffrey Frank, whose career includes professional years at the Washington Post and the New Yorker magazine, has written the first full account of the Truman presidency in nearly 30 years. The book's subtitle reflects the theme of the biography: "The Extraordinary Presidency of an Ordinary Man, 1945-1953." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 4m) | Share This Episode
    April 12, 2022
    Ep. 57 Christopher Leonard, "The Lords of Easy Money"
    The book is titled "The Lords of Easy Money: How the Federal Reserve Broke the American Economy." The author is Christopher Leonard, the current director of the Watchdog Writers Group at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. On the dust jacket of the book it says: "If you ask most people what forces led to today's income inequality and financial crashes, no one would say the Federal Reserve." Christopher Leonard explains why so few people understand the language or inner workings of how American money is managed by a seven-member board in Washington, DC.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    April 5, 2022
    Ep. 56 University of Virginia Student Emma Camp on Self-Censorship at College
    Emma Camp is a 22-year-old senior at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, home of Thomas Jefferson. She calls herself a liberal and has written opinion pieces for the school newspaper, The Cavalier Daily. Back in October of 2020, Ms. Camp had some strong things to say about the First Amendment. She wrote that: "The first amendment does not exist to protect reasonable opinions — it exists to protect the unreasonable, the offensive, and the unpopular." In March of 2022, she moved her opinions to a national platform, the New York Times op-ed page. We asked her to tell us what is behind her statement: "I went to college to learn from my professors and peers. I welcomed an environment that champions intellectual diversity and rigorous disagreement. Instead, my college experience has been defined by strict ideological conformity."  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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    March 29, 2022
    Ep. 55 Jeffrey Hooke, "The Myth of Private Equity"
    The list is long and, to a lot of people, confusing. We're talking about the language of money. How would you do if you had to define the following: stocks, bonds, private equity, index funds, leveraged buyouts, venture capital, hedge funds and sovereign wealth funds, just to name a few. We asked Jeffrey Hooke, author of "The Myth of Private Equity," to give us some help in understanding the world of investment and finance. Mr. Hooke is a senior lecturer at Johns Hopkins Business School and has spent all of his adult life in and around money.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    March 22, 2022
    Ep. 54 John Mearsheimer on Ukraine, International Relations, and the Military
    During his 40 years in the political science department at the University of Chicago, John Mearsheimer has not avoided controversy. His article and subsequent book about the Israel lobby, for example, written with Harvard University's Stephen Walt, caused a stir in 2006 and 2007. More recently, at the beginning of March 2022, the New Yorker ran a headline that read: "Why John Mearsheimer Blames the U.S. for the Crisis in Ukraine." We asked Prof. Mearsheimer to explain that and talked to him about being a realist, his military service, and his time in academia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 4m) | Share This Episode
    March 15, 2022
    Ep. 53 Mark Vonnegut, "The Heart of Caring"
    In the dedication of his book, "The Heart of Caring," Dr. Mark Vonnegut tells his patients, teachers, and parents everywhere, "Thank you for letting me have such a good time when I go to work." Dr. Vonnegut is a pediatrician who graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1979. This was after he had been diagnosed, at age 25, with severe schizophrenia. He's had four psychotic breakdowns in his life, but has managed to successfully practice pediatrics for close to forty years. Mark Vonnegut, in his newest book, writes about patients, parents, insurance companies, and his late father, the novelist Kurt Vonnegut.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    March 8, 2022
    Ep. 52 Willard Sterne Randall, "The Founders' Fortunes"
    What is the financial history of the Founding Fathers? How did their personal finances affect the Constitution and the new United States? Historian and Champlain College professor emeritus Willard Sterne Randall puts the focus on how money shaped the birth of America in his book "The Founders' Fortunes." Prof. Randall has written books about Benjamin Franklin, Benedict Arnold, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton and Ethan Allen. He has now turned his attention on these and other Founders and how they made and lost their money. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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    March 1, 2022
    Ep. 51 Brendan Simms & Charlie Laderman, "Hitler's American Gamble"
    The book "Hitler's American Gamble" recounts the five days in 1941 that upended everything. Starting with Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th and ending with Hitler's declaration of war on the United States on December 11th, British historians Brendan Simms and Charlie Laderman trace the developments during the five days in real-time and reveal how America's engagement in World War Two was far from inevitable.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    February 22, 2022
    Ep. 50 Clarence Lusane on the 1967 Detroit Race Riot, His Life & Work
    July 23rd of this year will mark the 55th anniversary of the Detroit Race Riot. Forty-three people died and more than 1000 were injured during that chaotic week in 1967. Our guest, Professor Clarence Lusane was there. His mother and sister were shot. We talked to him about that experience and about his academic career and activism, which has taken him around the world. Clarence Lusane is currently a professor of political science at Howard University in Washington, DC.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    February 15, 2022
    Ep. 49 Dwight Chapin, "The President's Man"
    "I knew Richard Nixon well." At age 81, Dwight Chapin has decided, for the first time, to write about his years in politics and the Nixon White House. His book is called "The President's Man: The Memoirs of Nixon's Trusted Aide." In the first chapter, he writes: "I started working for him as an organizational field man during his 1962 California gubernatorial campaign….I became an advance man at the beginning of the 1966 off-year election cycle and then his personal aide in 1967. In the White House, as his appointments secretary, I had the office next to his." Unfortunately for Chapin, as he explains later, his time working for Richard Nixon didn't end well.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 56m) | Share This Episode
    February 8, 2022
    Ep. 48 Andrew Roberts, "The Last King of America"
    British historian Andrew Roberts, in the introduction of his latest book called "The Last King of America," about King George III, says the following: "This portrait of a heartless, absolute sovereign is repeated almost every single day in America's print and online media. Even two centuries after his death, hardly a day passes in the United States without some reference to George III where he is still held up as an…archetypal bogeyman, attacked in the same measure by Democrats and Republicans alike." Andrew Roberts, who says the Revolutionary War-era English king was misunderstood, has also written major histories about Napoleon, Churchill, and World War Two.       Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 2m) | Share This Episode
    February 1, 2022
    Ep. 47 Bethany McLean on Elizabeth Holmes & Theranos
    In early 2001, Bethany McLean, at the time a reporter for Fortune magazine, asked the question in an article: "How does Enron make its money?" McLean's reporting, and the reporting of others, led to inquiries that were put to the Enron management. Within a few months, the company was bankrupt. Bethany McLean's subsequent book, "The Smartest Guys in the Room," became a bestseller and a successful documentary. In January 2022, she wrote about her reaction to the Theranos saga. In an essay about the trial of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes, she wrote, "For those who believe she was guilty of a great crime, it's a disappointing verdict." She joined us to talk about it.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    January 25, 2022
    Ep. 46 Debby Applegate, "Madam"
    On the dust jacket of Debby Applegate's book "Madam," it says "Simply put: Everybody came to Polly's." Polly being Polly Adler, the madam of some of the most popular brothels in New York City during the 1920s. It was a hangout for politicians, entertainers, writers, and members of the city's underworld. According to Debby Applegate, Polly's pals included FDR, Frank Sinatra, Desi Arnaz, and Duke Ellington, among many others. She joined us to talk about Polly Adler and the power Adler wielded in New York City during the Jazz Age.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 6m) | Share This Episode
    January 18, 2022
    Ep. 45 Lance Geiger, The History Guy
    In March of 2017, Lance Geiger, from the basement of his house in O'Fallon, Illinois, created a new business, a YouTube show that is now regularly seen by hundreds of thousands of people. Since that day in 2017, Geiger has been known as "The History Guy." He has produced hundreds of short documentaries on history. In his home studio, "The History Guy" is surrounded by artifacts, including military hats and ship models, and he's always dressed in his trademark dark suit, dark-rimmed glasses, and bow tie. Lance Geiger joined us to talk about the genesis of the "The History Guy" program, the work involved in putting out three episodes a week, and the success the show has attained over the past five years.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 3m) | Share This Episode
    January 11, 2022
    Ep. 44 John Berresford, The Hiss-Chambers Espionage Case
    The first ever televised congressional hearing was on August 3, 1948. The first witness was a man who said he didn't want to be there. He had been subpoenaed to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC). His name was Whittaker Chambers, an American who had been a Communist spy for the Soviet Union in the 1930s. We spoke to DC-based attorney John Berresford, who has spent years studying Chambers and the story and trial of the man Chambers accused of also being a Communist spy, Alger Hiss. Mr. Berresford has presented the story of the Hiss-Chambers espionage case in a series of 38 lectures on YouTube.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 18m) | Share This Episode
    January 4, 2022
    Ep. 43 James Golden, "Rush on the Radio"
    "What's your question or comment for Rush?" That is how James Golden – aka Bo Snerdley – would greet callers to Rush Limbaugh's daily, 3-hour radio program. Mr. Golden has written a book about his time as call screener, official show observer, and producer of the most popular talk radio show in America during the past three decades. Rush Limbaugh died on February 17, 2021. In his book "Rush on the Radio," which Mr. Golden says is a tribute to his former boss and friend, he writes about his love of radio and how the Limbaugh program came together behind the scenes.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    December 28, 2021
    Ep. 42 Isabel Wilkerson, "The Warmth of Other Suns"
    Between 1915 and 1970, six million African Americans moved from the rural South to cities in the North in search of a better life. Author Isabel Wilkerson captured the history of that mass movement, known as the Great Migration, in her Pulitzer Prize-winning book "The Warmth of Other Suns." She sat down with us in 2010 to talk about the book and the approach she took to tell the story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 19m) | Share This Episode
    December 21, 2021
    Ep. 41 Jay Cost, "James Madison"
    In 1787, between May and September, James Madison gave 167 speeches, made 72 motions, and served on four committees at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Jay Cost writes that "most importantly, Madison authored the Virginia Plan, a bold call for a total redesign of the national government that set the agenda for the convention and established the foundation upon which the Constitution would be built." At that time, James Madison was 36 years old. Jay Cost, a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and author of "James Madison: America's First Politician," joined us to talk about the influential Founding Father.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    December 14, 2021
    Ep. 40 Roosevelt Montás, "Rescuing Socrates"
    Roosevelt Montás came to the United States from the Dominican Republic in 1985 at the age of twelve. He couldn't speak a word of English. He eventually went on get a Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University, where he currently teaches. Prof. Montás joined us to talk about his latest book, "Rescuing Socrates," in which he chronicles his journey and explains how books by St. Augustine, Socrates, Freud and Gandhi changed his life.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 4m) | Share This Episode
    December 7, 2021
    Ep. 39 Ty Seidule, "Robert E. Lee and Me"
    "Many people don't want to believe that the citizens of the Southern states were willing to fight and die to preserve the morally repugnant institution of slavery. There has to be another reason, we are told. Well, there isn't." Those are the words of retired Southern-born Army general Ty Seidule, who taught at West Point for two decades. Gen. Seidule, author of "Robert E. Lee and Me," grew up revering Confederate general Robert E. Lee and believing in the Lost Cause, but eventually grew to view Confederate soldiers, including Lee, as "traitors for slavery." He joined us to talk about his transformation and the reaction he received when he made his views public.      Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    November 30, 2021
    Ep. 38 Michael Knox Beran, "WASPs"
    WASPs – White Anglo-Saxon Protestants – such as Henry Adams, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Dean Acheson, and Joe Alsop, held an outsized influence on American culture and history for much of the country's history, waning only after the mid-twentieth century. Author Michael Knox Beran ("BARE"-in) joins us to talk about the power, privilege, and contributions of WASPs in the United States and the eventual backlash against them, their ideas, and their way of life.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 57m) | Share This Episode
    November 23, 2021
    Ep. 37 Jason Emerson, "Giant in the Shadows"
    Abraham Lincoln and his wife Mary were the parents of four boys. Only one – Robert – lived beyond his eighteenth birthday. Author Jason Emerson spent nearly a decade researching the 82-plus years of Robert Lincoln's life, including his time as a Union soldier, minister to Great Britain, Secretary of War, and president of the Pullman Car Company. Mr. Emerson is the author of "Giant in the Shadows: The Life of Robert T. Lincoln."   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 8m) | Share This Episode
    November 16, 2021
    Ep. 36 Walter Pincus, "Blown to Hell"
    From 1946 to 1958, the U.S. government conducted 67 nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands, a chain of islands and coral atolls in the Pacific Ocean that had been inhabited for thousands of years. Walter Pincus, longtime national security reporter for the Washington Post and current national security columnist for the Cipher Brief, talks about the tests and the fate of the Marshallese people who had to deal with the fallout. Mr. Pincus tells the story in his latest book "Blown to Hell: America's Deadly Betrayal of the Marshall Islanders."  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 58m) | Share This Episode
    November 9, 2021
    Ep. 35 Edward Moser, "The Lost History of the Capitol"
    Edward Moser has been a speechwriter for President George H.W. Bush and a writer for the "Tonight Show with Jay Leno." He currently works as a tour guide, historian, and author. We spoke to Mr. Moser about his latest book, "The Lost History of the Capitol," an account of the many bizarre, tragic, and violent episodes around the U.S. Capitol Building since 1790.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 5m) | Share This Episode
    November 2, 2021
    Ep. 34 Amity Shlaes on Calvin Coolidge's Autobiography
    "It is a great advantage to a President, and a major source of safety to the country, for him to know that he is not a great man," wrote President Calvin Coolidge in his autobiography, originally published in 1929. An expanded and annotated version of that book, which historian Craig Fehrman calls "the forgotten classic of presidential writing," has recently been published by ISI Books. Amity Shlaes, chair of the Calvin Coolidge Presidential Foundation and co-editor of the new edition of the autobiography, joins us to talk about the book and its importance today.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 59m) | Share This Episode
    October 26, 2021
    Ep. 33 Mike Duncan "Hero of Two Worlds"
    Frenchman the Marquis de Lafayette came to America two years after the start of the American Revolution and was promptly made a major general in the Continental Army by George Washington. The year was 1777 and Lafayette, an aristocrat with no military experience, was 19. He later returned to France and helped launch the French Revolution. History podcaster Mike Duncan, author of "Hero of Two Worlds," joined us to talk about Lafayette's life and fight for liberty on both sides of the Atlantic.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 11m) | Share This Episode
    October 19, 2021
    Ep. 32 Keith Richburg, Director of the Journalism and Media Studies Centre at the University of Hong Kong
    Keith Richburg, a native of Detroit, has been a print journalist for nearly his entire life. During his 30 years at the Washington Post he reported from countries in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. He is currently the director of the Journalism and Media Studies Centre at the University of Hong Kong. We chatted with Mr. Richburg about his career, his life in Hong Kong, China, the United States, and more.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 7m) | Share This Episode
    October 12, 2021
    Ep. 31 Nathaniel Philbrick, "Travels with George"
    After he became president in 1789, George Washington visited all thirteen former colonies to talk to citizens about the United States and what it meant to be an American. In 2018, historian Nathaniel Philbrick, along with his wife and dog, set out to retrace Washington's journey to find out how much has changed since then. He chronicled the trip in a new book, "Travels with George." We talked to Mr. Philbrick about Washington's journey and legacy and what he learned from following in Washington's footsteps over two centuries later.     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 59m) | Share This Episode
    October 5, 2021
    Ep. 30 Erik Larson, "No One Goes Alone"
    Erik Larson is the author six nationally bestselling nonfiction books, including "The Devil in the White City," which was on bestseller lists for years and "The Splendid and the Vile," published in 2020. His latest, available only as an audiobook, is a work of fiction, a ghost story based in 1905 called "No One Goes Alone." Mr. Larson joined us to talk about the new audiobook, his previous books, being critiqued by his wife, teaching, and more.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 3m) | Share This Episode
    September 28, 2021
    Ep. 29 Craig Whitlock, "The Afghanistan Papers"
    In 2019, through FOIA requests and lawsuits, the Washington Post obtained hundreds of interviews conducted by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) for its Lessons Learned Program. The interviews showed that behind the scenes, U.S. military and government officials in Afghanistan presented a far gloomier picture of the war and reconstruction efforts than was presented to the American public by officials in Washington. Washington Post investigative reporter Craig Whitlock, author of "The Afghanistan Papers," joins us to talk about the Post's efforts to obtain the SIGAR interviews, the war in Afghanistan, his reporting on the U.S. Navy's "Fat Leonard" scandal, and more.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 15m) | Share This Episode
    September 21, 2021
    Ep. 28 Kathleen Smith, "Moscow 1956"
    On February 25, 1956, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev delivered a secret speech to the 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in which he denounced the crimes, bad decisions, and cult of personality of his predecessor, Joseph Stalin, who had died three years earlier. Georgetown University professor Kathleen Smith, author of "Moscow 1956," joined us to talk about the speech, what Khrushchev hoped to achieve with it, and what it eventually led to.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 58m) | Share This Episode
    September 14, 2021
    Ep. 27 Susan Ronald, "The Ambassador"
    Joseph P. Kennedy, the patriarch of the Kennedy dynasty, served as U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom from 1938-1940. By the end of his tenure, he was despised by both governments. Historian Susan Ronald, author of "The Ambassador," describes Joseph Kennedy as a Fascist sympathizer and anti-Semite whose desire for power eclipsed his allegiance to his country. She joined us to talk about all of that and more.      Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 43m) | Share This Episode
    September 7, 2021
    Ep. 26 20th Anniversary of 9/11
    Twenty years ago on September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the U.S. took the lives of nearly 3,000 people, over 2,600 of which were in New York City at the World Trade Center. On September 12th, the day after, eyewitnesses to the attacks in New York City called into C-SPAN to share their stories.     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 48m) | Share This Episode
    August 31, 2021
    Ep. 25 Chester Morgan, "Liberal Redneck"
    Theodore Bilbo (1877-1947) served twice as governor of Mississippi and was elected to the U.S. Senate three times. He was a liberal, a strong supporter of FDR's New Deal, and a member of the Ku Klux Klan. We talked with University of Southern Mississippi history professor emeritus Chester "Bo" Morgan, author of "Redneck Liberal," to find out more about Theodore Bilbo and his controversial political career.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 49m) | Share This Episode
    August 24, 2021
    Ep. 24 David Shambaugh, "China's Leaders: From Mao to Now"
    George Washington University professor David Shambaugh has written nearly 30 books on the subject of Asia, a great majority of which focus on China. He talked with us about his latest, "China's Leaders," in which he profiles the five leaders of the People's Republic of China since 1949 and provides an analysis of their policies.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1h 4m) | Share This Episode
    August 17, 2021
    Ep. 23 Derrick Bell, "Faces at the Bottom of the Well"
    If you research the origins of critical race theory, one of the names you'll find is Derrick Bell (1930-2011). Prof. Bell, Harvard Law School's first black tenured professor, appeared on Booknotes in 1992 to talk about his book "Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism." In this excerpt from that program, he talks about the status of blacks in America and his personal experiences with racism.     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 29m) | Share This Episode
    August 10, 2021
    Ep. 22 Jenny Hartley, "Charles Dickens: A Very Short Introduction"
    British author Charles Dickens is credited with creating some of the world's best-known fictional characters. To find out more about Charles Dickens, his work, and his two visits to the United States, we spoke to Jenny Hartley, emeritus professor of English at the University of Roehampton in London. She has written three books about Dickens, including "Charles Dickens: A Very Short Introduction," published in 2019.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 49m) | Share This Episode
    August 3, 2021
    Ep. 21 Ken Cuthbertson, "Inside: The Biography of John Gunther"
    Veteran Canadian journalist Ken Cuthbertson talks about the life and work of American writer John Gunther (1901-1970), author of the popular "Inside" book series that provided an in-depth look at countries around the world. The series included the 1947 bestseller "Inside U.S.A.," in which Gunther provided observations, sometimes highly critical, from his visits to every state in the country.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 52m) | Share This Episode
    July 27, 2021
    Ep. 20 David Stewart, "George Washington"
    Historian and attorney David Stewart talks about the political career of George Washington and his evolution from an egotistical military hero to Founding Father of the United States.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 45m) | Share This Episode
    July 20, 2021
    Ep. 19 Robert Novak, "The Prince of Darkness"
    The late columnist Robert Novak (1931-2009) was nicknamed "the prince of darkness" by friends and enemies alike in Washington, DC. He appeared on C-SPAN's "Q&A" program in 2007 to discuss his memoir, titled "The Prince of Darkness," in which he tells stories about his 50 years as a reporter, television personality, author, and conservative commentator. He also talked about many of the sources he had during that time.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 23m) | Share This Episode
    July 13, 2021
    Ep. 18: Peter Osnos, "An Especially Good View"
    Longtime reporter, editor and publisher Peter Osnos has published books by four American presidents, two Russian presidents, George Soros, Natan Sharansky, and a host of other high profile figures. In his new memoir "An Especially Good View" he discusses his publishing history, Russia, reporting on the Vietnam War for the Washington Post, and more. Mr. Osnos was vice president and senior editor at Random House from 1984-1996 and publisher & CEO at PublicAffairs, which he founded, from 1997-2005.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 59m) | Share This Episode
    July 6, 2021
    Ep. 17: Carol Leonnig on the Rise and Fall of the Secret Service
    The Washington Post's Carol Leonnig reports on the overall record, including serious failures, of the Secret Service from the assassination of John F. Kennedy to today. Ms. Leonnig first reported on the Secret Service in 2012, when agents working in Colombia engaged in a night of booze and prostitutes, a scandal that became known as "Hooker-gate." Ms. Leonnig talks to Brian Lamb about her new book "Zero Fail".  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 55m) | Share This Episode
    June 29, 2021
    Ep. 16: Michael Dobbs, "King Richard"
    Based on the Nixon tapes and the personal memoirs of Nixon administration officials, author and former Washington Post reporter Michael Dobbs tells the story of the Watergate scandal through the eyes of its participants in his new book "King Richard." Mr. Dobbs portrays what happened during the 100 days following President Nixon's second inauguration on January 20, 1973. Here's his conversation with Brian Lamb.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 52m) | Share This Episode
    June 22, 2021
    Ep. 15: David Stokes, "JFK's Ghost"
    "I'd rather win a Pulitzer Prize than be President of the United States," said John F. Kennedy in 1953. In 1957 he was awarded the prize for "Profiles in Courage." In "JFK's Ghost," author and retired pastor David Stokes tells the story behind the publishing of "Profiles in Courage" (written mostly by speechwriter Ted Sorensen), Kennedy's all out pursuit of the Pulitzer Prize, and the impact that the book had on his political career. David Stokes talked with Brian Lamb. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 38m) | Share This Episode
    June 15, 2021
    Ep. 14: Dan Glickman, "Laughing at Myself"
    A longtime Washington, DC, legislator and official known for his humor and friendliness, Dan Glickman (D-KS), author of "Laughing at Myself," was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1977-1995, served as US Secretary of Agriculture from 1995–2001 and was chairman of the Motion Picture Association of America from 2004–2010. He talked to Brian Lamb about his long political career, political relationships in Washington, the entertainment industry, and the importance of humor in his life.     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 41m) | Share This Episode
    June 8, 2021
    Ep. 13: Liz Carpenter's Washington
    Reporter and speechwriter Liz Carpenter (1920-2010), known for her acumen, humor, and Texas drawl, served as executive assistant to Vice President Lyndon Johnson and press secretary for Lady Bird Johnson. During this selection from her appearance on Booknotes in 1994, she talked with Brian Lamb about the importance of storytelling and humor, covering FDR as a young reporter, working in the Johnson White House, her relationship with Bill & Hillary Clinton, and more.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 22m) | Share This Episode
    June 1, 2021
    Ep. 12: Douglas Brinkley on Bob Dylan & Chuck Berry
    Historian and bestselling author Douglas Brinkley has written dozens of books spanning topics such as American presidents, politics and culture, World War II, Hurricane Katrina and Hunter S. Thompson. Recently, he sat down with Brian Lamb for six hours to talk about a wide-range of topics, everything from U.S. presidents and Neil Armstrong to Evel Knievel (EE-vuhl kuh-NEE-vuhl) and his trip to Cuba with Christopher Hitchens and Sean Penn. That whole conversation can be heard on C-SPAN's "Talking With…" podcast, available now. During this 25min segment from that interview, Prof. Brinkley talks about his relationships with Bob Dylan, Chuck Berry, and other musicians.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 29m) | Share This Episode
    May 25, 2021
    Ep. 11: Christopher Bonner, "Remaking the Republic"
    University of Maryland professor Christopher Bonner discusses his book "Remaking the Republic," about free black Americans and the limits of legal change during the 19th Century. He also talks to Brian Lamb about his approach to teaching and his appearance on the six-part CNN series "Lincoln: Divided We Stand."   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 43m) | Share This Episode
    May 18, 2021
    Ep. 10: Holman Jenkins, Wall Street Journal Columnist
    Wall Street Journal editorial board member and columnist Holman Jenkins joins Brian Lamb to talk about the media, politics, the COVID pandemic, global warming, and more. Mr. Jenkins' twice-weekly column appears in the Wall Street Journal on Wednesdays and Saturdays.     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 39m) | Share This Episode
    May 11, 2021
    Ep 9: Doris Kearns Goodwin, "No Ordinary Time"
    Author and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin appeared on Booknotes in 1994 to talk to Brian Lamb about her book, "No Ordinary Time," about the White House scene during FDR's presidency, and the intimate circle of friends surrounding Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt during that period. This is a brief selection from that interview.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 23m) | Share This Episode
    May 4, 2021
    Ep. 8: Jason Hershey-David's Tent DC
    Brian Lamb talked with Jason Hershey, founder of David's Tent DC, a 24/7, inter-denominational ministry located on the National Mall, where Christians come together to worship through music and prayer. The 1,600 square foot tent has been a fixture on the Mall since 2015.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 38m) | Share This Episode
    April 27, 2021
    Ep. 7: Randall Robinson - Off to St. Kitts
    Randall Robinson, author, human rights activist and founder of the TransAfrica Forum. He talks with Brian Lamb about his work and his decision to leave the United States for St. Kitts in 2001. Randall Robinson is the author of "Defending the Spirit," "Quitting America," and other books. He has appeared on C-SPAN many times, including on our "Q&A" interview program in 2007, from where this selection is taken.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 22m) | Share This Episode
    April 24, 2021
    Ep. 6: Peter Henriques – A New Portrait of George Washington
    Historian Peter Henriques discusses with Brian Lamb his book, "First and Always," about the strengths and flaws of the George Washington. Mr. Henriques is professor emeritus of history at George Mason University and the author of several other books on George Washington.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 42m) | Share This Episode
    April 20, 2021
    Ep. 5: Harlow Giles Unger – Thomas Paine, Forgotten Hero of the American Revolution
    Historian Harlow Unger chats with Brian Lamb about the work and legacy of Thomas Paine. Mr. Paine's political writings inspired American revolutionaries, but his later writings on religion made him a pariah. Harlow Unger's book, "Thomas Paine and the Clarion Call for American Independence," is the latest of 27 he has written, including many on the Founding Fathers.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 38m) | Share This Episode
    April 17, 2021
    Ep. 4: Thomas Ricks – The Founders, the Greeks, and the Romans
    Brian Lamb talks with longtime journalist and author Tom Ricks about his book, "First Principles," which examines the influence of the work of Greek and Roman philosophers on our Founding Fathers. Mr. Ricks' other books include "Fiasco," about the Iraq War, and "Churchill & Orwell." www.c-span.org/person/?thomasricks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 40m) | Share This Episode
    April 13, 2021
    Ep. 3: Craig Fehrman – The Words of Our Presidents
    Journalist and historian Craig Fehrman talks with Brian Lamb about his selection of the best writing done by U.S. Presidents. His book, "The Best Presidential Writing: From 1789 to the Present," is a follow-up to his first book, "Author-in-Chief," about the books written by our Presidents.  www.c-span.org/person/?124859  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 45m) | Share This Episode
    April 10, 2021
    Ep. 2: Christina Shutt – Incoming Executive Director of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum
    Christina Shutt talks to Brian Lamb about her goals for the Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum after she takes over as executive director this summer. She also talks about her background and her time as executive director of the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center in Little Rock, Arkansas.   www.oracle.com/goto/cspan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 41m) | Share This Episode
    April 6, 2021
    Ep. 1: Eleanor Herman - Sex with Presidents
    Historian Eleanor Herman joins Brian Lamb to talk about her book, "Sex with Presidents," about sex scandals involving U.S. presidents going back to the early years of the Republic. Eleanor Herman is the author of many other books, including "Sex with the Queen" and "Sex with Kings." www.c-span.org/person/?eleanorherman Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 43m) | Share This Episode
    March 31, 2021
    Trailer: Booknotes+
    Booknotes is back with more compelling interviews in a new podcast Booknotes+. Taking the concept from his long running one-hour Booknotes TV program, Brian Lamb is tailoring the discussion for a new platform and new audience. Booknotes+ offers podcast listeners more books and more interviews in a shorter period of time. Whether you watched Booknotes on TV (1989-2004) or are experiencing it now for the first time on its new platform, the goal is the same – give listeners the opportunity to learn something new. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Download (Duration: 1m) | Share This Episode