Chinese, Native Americans and the Transcontinental Railroad

On May 10, 1869, a symbolic final golden spike was driven into a rail, linking the Central Pacific Railroad from the west and the Union… read more

On May 10, 1869, a symbolic final golden spike was driven into a rail, linking the Central Pacific Railroad from the west and the Union Pacific Railroad from the east at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory. The Transcontinental Railroad was complete. In this program, a Stanford University sociology professor and the associate director of the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project at Stanford discussed how Chinese workers and native peoples in the region were affected by the seminal event.

This program was part of a 150th anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad symposium hosted by the Stanford Historical Society. close

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  • Jennifer Cauble Member Stanford Historical Society->Board of Directors
  • Hilton Obenzinger Associate Director Stanford University->Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project
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Chinese, Native Americans and the Transcontinental Railroad

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Program ID:
459416-3
Category:
Public Affairs Event
Format:
Forum
Location:
Stanford, California, United States
First Aired:
Apr 28, 2019 | 1:44pm EDT | C-SPAN 3
Last Aired:
May 30, 2019 | 2:21am EDT | C-SPAN 3

Airing Details

  • Apr 28, 2019 | 1:44pm EDT | C-SPAN 3
  • May 29, 2019 | 9:57pm EDT | C-SPAN 3
  • May 30, 2019 | 2:21am EDT | C-SPAN 3
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Chinese, Native Americans and the Transcontinental Railroad

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